#1
Hi, im just wondering what type of finger positions i shud use when playing scales. A previous guitar teacher taught me this method: say for example a c major scale starting on the 8th fret of the sixth string. To hit the first note u wud put ur 1st and 2nd fingers on the 7th and 8th frets, then for the next note put ur 3rd and 4th fingers on the 9th and 10th frets. To move to the next note on the next string u wud only take ur first finger of the 7th fret to the 7th fret on the next string, keeping all other fingers in place until u needed them to move to notes. Im not sure if this makes any sense lol, sorta hard to explain. This method feels more uncomfertable to me, i'd rather just apply single fingers to frets. i'v seen other guitar teachers on youtube teach scales and they don't seem to be practicin the first method described above. Shud i continue to practice the 1st method or just do what feels comfortable?
Any info wud be great
#2
First of all: Use English
Second, there's no "scale fingering". It depends entirely on the passage you're playing. You're clearly thinking of scales as box shapes, which is incorrect. You need to learn the notes all over the fretboard, and then learn the theory behind the major scale.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by enginehead
Hi, im just wondering what type of finger positions i shud use when playing scales. A previous guitar teacher taught me this method: say for example a c major scale starting on the 8th fret of the sixth string. To hit the first note u wud put ur 1st and 2nd fingers on the 7th and 8th frets, then for the next note put ur 3rd and 4th fingers on the 9th and 10th frets. To move to the next note on the next string u wud only take ur first finger of the 7th fret to the 7th fret on the next string, keeping all other fingers in place until u needed them to move to notes. Im not sure if this makes any sense lol, sorta hard to explain. This method feels more uncomfertable to me, i'd rather just apply single fingers to frets. i'v seen other guitar teachers on youtube teach scales and they don't seem to be practicin the first method described above. Shud i continue to practice the 1st method or just do what feels comfortable?
Any info wud be great


well for the pattern you described (shown in G here, but its the same in C):




your fingers would line up from the 7th fret to the 10th. Whatever finger is lined up with a particular fret, would play the notes in that fret.

so the tonic would be played with the 2nd finger and all the other notes would be played by the finger thats lined up with that fret.

basically..... 1 finger per fret and the fingers are consistent in which fret they play. Keep in mind this may vary. Sometimes you have to shift up or down a fret to accommodate a particular pattern.

If you want to see someone play though it, watch this video


Quote by Archeo Avis
You're clearly thinking of scales as box shapes, which is incorrect.


^ ignore stuff like that...... its not in any way "incorrect" to learn scale patterns or "box shapes" on the neck.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 1, 2008,
#4
Quote by GuitarMunky
stuff like that...... its not in any way "incorrect" to learn scale patterns or "box shapes" on the neck.
Box shapes are very useful to know, but learning scales as box shapes (and not the other way around) is dangerous and leads to statements like...

WARNING: MODE CONTENT

"You can play B Locrian over a C major progression for a dark, evil sound," which is of course incorrect.

END MODE CONTENT

The other way around is that you learn the C major scale as the notes C D E F G A B and then find convenient ways of playing those notes all over the fretboard, the box shapes.
#5
^ ignore stuff like that...... its not in any way "incorrect" to learn scale patterns or "box shapes" on the neck.


Where did I say he shouldn't learn the patterns? Show me.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jul 1, 2008,
#6
Scale shapes are very important for people to learn how to improvise. But I would only suggest a pentatonic shape, as if you've already mastered the pentatonics (as in, you enjoy it) than you're probably ready to break out of simple shapes and should learn all the theory you can.

To T/S
It doesnt really matter what fingering you use, as long as its comfortable. Some people will suggest using the first finger (pointer) for the first line of frets in your shape, than the 2nd finger (rude mutherfucker finger) for the second line of frets and so on.
So I would suggest someone to finger say the classic pentatonic shape 1st finger, than fourth finger, than 1st finger, than 3rd and so on.
But you should always play what feels most comfortable (oh I can see freepower and guitar_theory and matt and all the other jazz guitarist's flaming me for this one).
#7
^ jazz guitarist is probably the last thing i am. Secondly, comfort=/=correct. Guitar is forcing your fingers onto cheese wire, any comfort is habit. Habits can be good or bad.

Quote by enginehead
Hi, im just wondering what type of finger positions i shud use when playing scales. A previous guitar teacher taught me this method: say for example a c major scale starting on the 8th fret of the sixth string. To hit the first note u wud put ur 1st and 2nd fingers on the 7th and 8th frets, then for the next note put ur 3rd and 4th fingers on the 9th and 10th frets. To move to the next note on the next string u wud only take ur first finger of the 7th fret to the 7th fret on the next string, keeping all other fingers in place until u needed them to move to notes. Im not sure if this makes any sense lol, sorta hard to explain. This method feels more uncomfertable to me, i'd rather just apply single fingers to frets. i'v seen other guitar teachers on youtube teach scales and they don't seem to be practicin the first method described above. Shud i continue to practice the 1st method or just do what feels comfortable?
Any info wud be great


Your teacher is correct - what he's trying to build is finger independence - your fingers need to learn to be able to move individually, the reason it's uncomfortable now is because your fingers are so weak, or because you're tensing up the fingers that aren't moving (they should be relaxed).

Don't expect youtube teachers to teach as well as a guy face to face.
#8
Quote by Freepower
^ jazz guitarist is probably the last thing i am. Secondly, comfort=/=correct. Guitar is forcing your fingers onto cheese wire, any comfort is habit. Habits can be good or bad.
First off, I've heard some of your songs . Sweet jazzy goodness, warms me right down to the cockles of my heart and crotch . Some of the songs you write are so obviously jazz.

Second, I've heard many guitarist's say "comfort isn't always a good thing." Jazz guitarists more than anything (rock guitarists are more inclined to say, do whatever the hell you want). I dunno, I've just found I can play faster and more accuratly when I'm comfortable (as opposed to uncomfortable things like playing un-anchored), especially when it comes to fingering.
#9
^ perhaps. What i was pointing out was that guitar is naturally uncomfortable, and then we get so used to certain discomforts that we assume that's the feeling of playing guitar. Anything will be "comfortable" if you do it for long enough - ask edg about his old habits.

No-one's forcing you to play X way, or Y way, it's just that X way is closer to perfect technique. How close you want to get is your business and has so many factors that it's just impossible to judge on a few across the net.