#1
Ok so i have been playing for 6 years and im at a stage where i can right some pretty good stuff...my friend recorded me playing and sent it to everyone at my highschool and a huge fan base grew...everyone wanted more of my music...so i found a drummer and bass player and we started completing the songs i wrote....we finished 3 and they both left

so now im at it again this time with my best friend (he plays the rhythm guitar)

we have written over 30 songs together and we have played for small crowds of 30

we just found a drummer but he has a basic kit (a high hat,snare,a bass,a symbol,2 bongo things or whatever the hell you call them)

my friend only has an acoustic (getting his les paul in october)

so with that in mind...how can we successfully play gigs?
#2
by bongo things I think you mean toms.

uh find a bassist. and is your best friend the rhythm player playing rhythm on an acoustic?
#3
yes he is playing rhythm on an acoustic =/

there was a time when my other friend (he just started playing guitar 2 months ago) let my rhythm guitarist borrow his squire strat and we could actually perform...but that was like a one time thing

oh and thanks for telling me what toms were called =D

i cant find anyone who plays bass or even someone who has a bass...my rhythm guitarist said he would bounce back and forth with bass and guitar for the good of the band


is a basic drum kit good enough though? the drummer has said he is all for this band...but his kit seems like it wont hold up

my last drummer had a huge kit
#4
it depends if the songs need a better kit. as long as it does the songs.. who cares? if it cant do the songs for whatever reason.. you already have a problem
#5
well the drummer has potential and he is already great and can write some good stuff...better than the crap my last drummer was coming up with

im sure we can scrape by with his small kit until more money flows in

does wal-mart sell bass'?
#6
Why don't you just do acoustic sets then for the time being?
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#7
i dont have an acoustic haha...and well i have 2 amps my vox full stack and a danelectro honeytone 1 watt amp....so idk i could take my pocket amp but i still might turn it louder than his guitar
#8
Dude, what's wrong with that kit? You can get by fine with less... Tera Melos anyone? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2lhL-X4Gqvc

I'd say if your rhythm is willing he should pick up a bass and cover that. Then you can either pick up another guitar if you really need it later on, but bass is pretty important in keeping a full sound in a band situation.

Whatever you do DON'T BUY A BASS AT WALMART. IT IS NOT WORTH IT. Even a cheap Fender knock of from a pawn shop will do better. Also remember you'll need a bass amp, a guitar amp just won't sound the same. You should spend the bulk of your money on the amp. Keep am eye out in the classified ads in your area and around the local pawn shops for a few weeks and you should find something decent.
#9
thanks won....i can manage fantastically as the one and only guitarist..sure some songs call for another guitar but the bulk doesnt

yeah i just have to find a bass setup for cheap
#11
Quote by amazing FretMan

is a basic drum kit good enough though? the drummer has said he is all for this band...but his kit seems like it wont hold up

my last drummer had a huge kit

Yes, most of the work on a kit is done between the high hat, snare and bass drum. You watch someone with a huge kit, they generaly hardly touch most of it unless they're doing a solo. So really, big kits are usualy only for show anyway.
I've seen early footage of Black Sabbath where Bill Ward only had a four piece kit like your drummer has.
#12
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Yes, most of the work on a kit is done between the high hat, snare and bass drum. You watch someone with a huge kit, they generaly hardly touch most of it unless they're doing a solo. So really, big kits are usualy only for show anyway.
I've seen early footage of Black Sabbath where Bill Ward only had a four piece kit like your drummer has.



thanks slacker

i didnt know that about sabbath
#13
Bear in mind, the bigger the drumkit doesn't mean the better the drumkit

Music shops or maybe a school or college may let you rent gear for gigs etc. It's always worth a go asking.


GAS
Throbak Stonebender | Fulltone Deja Vibe | Catalinbread Semaphore
#14
Quote by amazing FretMan
thanks slacker

Anytime bud.
It's also worth knowing that many drummers reckon it's a good thing to play a small kit, especialy if your just starting out, because it makes you find ways of getting several different sounds out of each drum, like a jazz drummer does. So it kinda makes you a better drummer in the long run.
I once played a gig with a professional session drummer called Dave Peppard who turned up to the gig with the crappiest looking kit I've ever seen.
It had a side tom, layed on it's side for a bass drum, one snare, one small tom a high hat and one cymble. Every bit of metal on it was rusty and the shells were painted in black hammerite,... oh and for some strange reason, he had a hand from a shop window dummy hanging from the cymble stand, but he played it like a demon and he was seriously one of the best drummers I've ever worked with.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jul 3, 2008,
#16
dude, take what u can get for a starting band, its all really garage rock if u ask me, just go with it, no need to get self consious about ur team's equipment
#17
Depending on the style of music you might not need a bass player. I recently saw this band play http://www.myspace.com/mayhewthetraitor and their bass player couldn't make it to the show, and I thought that they were a two man band until I talked with them after the show and they said that their bass player couldn't make it. They are really good too check them out.
#18
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Anytime bud.
It's also worth knowing that many drummers reckon it's a good thing to play a small kit, especialy if your just starting out, because it makes you find ways of getting several different sounds out of each drum, like a jazz drummer does. So it kinda makes you a better drummer in the long run.
I once played a gig with a professional session drummer called Dave Peppard who turned up to the gig with the crappiest looking kit I've ever seen.
It had a side tom, layed on it's side for a bass drum, one snare, one small tom a high hit and one cymble. Every bit of metal on it was rusty and the shells were painted in balck hammerite,... oh and for some strange reason, he had a hand from a shop window dummy hanging from the cymble stand, but he played it like a demon and he was seriously one of the best drummers I've ever worked with.


That guy almost is my new drumming hero.
John Stainier still takes the cake for me though.
The man looks like he's gonna explode and kill everyone in the room the second he starts playing.
On a related note, he Stanier plays with a four piece and only a hi-hat and ride, no crash or anything, when he plays with Battles. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBFYeUOvVu4
The man is a damn machine!