#1
I have two Les Pauls, one Epiphone, one Gibson. The string tension is noticeably higher on the Epiphone, and after doing some basic measurements, it is actually 25" scale length (like a Strat). Looking at Epiphone's catalogue though, it states that it has a 24" scale length, which is the authentic Gibson measurement. I've played other Epiphones, and they all had looser strings like my Gibson. I'm not particularly bothered by it (in, fact, I kinda like the higher tension). I'm just wondering if this is normal, and if anyone else has an Epiphone Les Paul like this. Mine is an older Epi made in Korea, in 2003. I believe the current ones are made in China, are they not? Also, the headstock angle on my Epiphone is not as steep as my Gibson's headstock angle.

Perhaps the older Epiphones did not stick as closely to Gibson's specs as the newer ones? I'll take some pictures if anyone wants me to.
#2
you know. I think mine is the same way. Notice my name.
I plays guitars.
#3
The steeper headstock probably makes for higher string tension, im pretty sure all gibbys/epis are 24.75" in scale length. If it wasnt the neck simple wouldnt intonate, or the neck would be shorter.
#4
Quote by 2003LP
you know. I think mine is the same way. Notice my name.


Could you measure it? Just because it's the same year as mine, it might not actually be the same. Mine might just be a weird one.

Quote by beckyjc
The steeper headstock probably makes for higher string tension, im pretty sure all gibbys/epis are 24.75" in scale length. If it wasnt the neck simple wouldnt intonate, or the neck would be shorter.


No no, you don't understand. My Gibson's headstock is the one which angles back steeper. My Epiphone intonates just fine. I don't know if you understand scale length or not, but the distance between the frets is marginally bigger on my Epiphone. Very, very marginally. I didn't notice until I measured it today. I've always noticed it has a higher string tension than other Les Pauls (be they Gibsons or whatever), and the tension was much like what you get on a Stratocaster. I just never made the connection in my head until this morning when I thought "Wait a minute..." and measured it lol.

Check this out:


My Epi on the left, and my Gibbo on the right. I took this picture the other night for a different purpose. Compare the placement of the Tune-O-Matic bridge on both guitars. On the Epiphone, it's slightly further away from the bridge pickup, and more towards the bottom of the guitar than it is on the Gibson. Increased scale length, right there. But it's not just that they placed the bridge wonky, the actually scale length is longer, and not by accident, since the fret spacing is also slightly bigger. I don't know if you can see in that picture, but the 22nd fret is slightly closer to the end of the fretboard on the Epi. In fact, you definitely can't see that in the picture, lol.

And yeah, I know it's 24.75", I just never bother writing the decimal.
Last edited by Martin Scott at Jul 2, 2008,
#5
Sorry i misread the post. I do understand scale length chuck. I didnt think you meant the neck was actually longer, just figured you couldve mis-measured the distance since 24.75 isnt too far from 25, i have read before that some earlier Epis tend to have 25.5" scale, but that was on more obsecure models than the LP, but i dont know much on Epis/gibbys anyhow.

If you like the tougher string tension just fiddle about with the height of the tail peice. Lowering it increases the tension.
#6
I don't think the neck itself is longer (I may measure from the joint to the nut, to make sure). The fret spacing is a tiny bit bigger, but that wouldn't necessarily require a longer neck, since there's a fair bit og space on the fretboard after the 22nd fret, anyway. I have the tail-piece as low as it'll go on both guitars. I took some more pics just now, which show the differences better:





You can see the differences in headstock angle, and I took a better picture of the bridges.
#9
There is no true gibson scale they vary alot over the years. From 24.5 to almost 25. Also remember gibson are made to imperial or inch measurements and epis are made to metric so they wont perfectly line up in scale. People in 90 percent of the world have no idea of what inches, foot, yard is. You can always top wrap the strings on the epi to lower the tension a little.
#10
I think I heard standard Epiphones use a 14 degree headstock angle, while Gibsons use a 17 degree angle. Epiphone Elitists use the correct 17 degree angle.
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#11
whats top wrap?
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#12
Quote by beckyjc
The steeper headstock probably makes for higher string tension, im pretty sure all gibbys/epis are 24.75" in scale length. If it wasnt the neck simple wouldnt intonate, or the neck would be shorter.

yeah, traditionally the "gibson" scale length is 24.75" and the "fender" scale is 25.5", even though it seems like only the strat and tele actually have this, whereas pretty much all other fenders are 24" or 24.75".

That is kinda weird though.
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