#1
I'm reading the Music Theory FAQ thread but I get confused quite quickly on this material, just checking if I've got the jist right so far...

--5---8--------------
--5---8--------------
--5--7---------------
--5--7---------------
--5--7---------------
--5---8--------------


Okay, that's the minor pentatonic scale, in the key of A because the low E string at the 5th fret is an A note, and that's the root note of the scale-- correct??

So if I wanted to make some licks or a song, what is the deal with "switching" scales? For example if I started a song with a lick using this scale above, but then later on in the song I bust out something with the blue scale with the added flat 5th (correct?), is that normal or can two scales not mix? I'm really new at the theory and trying to make sense of it at some basic levels.
#2
You are correct so far. And Essentially the blues scale replaces the Minor Pentatonic. It doesn't matter though, you can mix scales together that work together (no A major in that paticular song for example). So adding the flattened 5th will work in that case, and maybe occassionally adding the other notes that make up the Natural Minor Scale.
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#3
that is the root correct. if you are playing to a chord progression then you want to play in proportion . lets say your playing A minor pent to a F chord that means ur playing in fifths to the thing.
so if the chord turns into g major then u gotta play B minor pent. there are no real rules. its all about the feel that you want to project in ur playing watch joe satrianis theory videos on youtube
#4
I'm kinda new to theory too so this is my noob opinion, but I don't think mixing scales isn't a big issue, in fact in a lot of the solo lessons I've seen its almost a must. If you want to switch around within the bounds of any minor pent just study slash. He relies very heavily on the minor pent, and as a trend the C minor pent.

Oh, and yes that is the A minor pent you got tabbed up there. Kind of a noob like I said, but I think on scales its the root that determines what scale it is, but to the best of my knowledge this doesnt apply to chord.

Hope that helps, rock on brother.
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Last edited by gizmodious at Jul 2, 2008,
#5
Thanks a lot, you guys rule! So a few more questions:

Thanks MBMetalTabber, the way you said the Blues scale essentially replaces the minor pentatonic makes perfect sense to me. So let's take the Blues scale:

--5--8--------------
--5--8--------------
--5-78--------------
--5-7---------------
--567---------------
--5--8--------------


Now if I want to make a chord, how would I do that? I think major scale = 1st, 3rd and 5th notes right? I'm getting my head around the scales but this I'm fuzzy on. It couldn't be 1st, 3rd and 5th here because that would be A,D and E but the D and E are on the same string of course, hehe.

And if you "mix" scales, is it random trial and error or is there any "system" one can follow? Can you guys provide a song (I love Hendrix/Clapton/Mayer style) that I could see where they use a minor/blues scale and then another one so I can see how it really worked? I'm really excited to learn all this, I just feel it opening up a lot of doors to my playing ability!!

Thanks dudes
#6
You are correct again, major triad is 1 3 5 of the major scale. BUT it has to be the major scale, not the pentatonic scale because that cuts notes out. So you end up with A C# E, which is A major. You have to find the notes on different strings to make the chord work. And if you look atthe typical A minor chord for guitar you'll notice it has 5 notes...this is because two of them are repeated (played twice) to make the chord sound fuller for guitar (yes, we have a weedy instrument of choice).

Also, 2 4 6, 3 5 7, 5 7 9(1), etc all make chords goin up the major scale as well, making a major minor minor major major minor diminished chord sequence going up the major scale. This changes when you use the minor scale, where it becomes minor diminished major minor minor major major.

If you want to mix the scales, you have to know what notes are in both scales (the same method used for making a key signature change eithin a song, essentially). EG A natural minor and A harmonic minor. You make the switch between them on the notes that are in both scales and add the notes specific to one scale or the other as you use those scales, using them to give different feels to different sections of your solo's.

Unfortunatley, I can't think of any songs off the top of my head where there are obvious but effective scale changes in the middle of the solo. If I think of any I'll make sure to repost.
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#7
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
You are correct again, major triad is 1 3 5 of the major scale. BUT it has to be the major scale, not the pentatonic scale because that cuts notes out. So you end up with A C# E, which is A major.


How do you end up with A C# E, can you explain?

Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
You have to find the notes on different strings to make the chord work. And if you look atthe typical A minor chord for guitar you'll notice it has 5 notes...this is because two of them are repeated (played twice) to make the chord sound fuller for guitar (yes, we have a weedy instrument of choice).


Gotcha.

Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
Also, 2 4 6, 3 5 7, 5 7 9(1), etc all make chords goin up the major scale as well, making a major minor minor major major minor diminished chord sequence going up the major scale. This changes when you use the minor scale, where it becomes minor diminished major minor minor major major.


Dang kinda lost me there, I don't understand the pattern part with major minor minor diminished, etc. And by 2 4 6, 3 5 7, 5 7 9(1) you mean the notes of the scale to make chords, right?

Also, with being a certain key, it's always about the root note of the scale you're playing right? So what if I just start playing something like:

-10/11------------------
-------5^7---------------
------------5^7-----------
---------------9b10br9---
-------------------------
-------------------------


Just a random example, how would I know what key I am in?
#8
ok, i lost you with the major scale explanations, so here it is in better detail (hopefully):
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
tone tone semitone tone tone tone semitone

notes on a keyboard (this will help):
C C# D D# E F F# G G# A A# B C

a tone is two notes, and a semitone is one note, so going up the c major scale using the notes on a keyboard you get:
C D E F G A B C

now, if we change that to A major, using the same pattern, the scale becomes:
A B C# D E F# G# A

so. the 1st, 3rd, and 5th of that scale are A C# E, which is A major.

now, if we keep going up the scale, taking the 2nd, 4th, and 6th notes of the scale, you get B D F#, which is B minor.

if you keep doing this, you will end up with (in the key of A major):
A major, B minor, C# minor, D major, E major, F# minor, G# diminished (this last chord could be played as a minor chord if you wanted)


now, that excercise you posted contains the notes D, D#, E, F#, C, D, B, C, B
so, to work out what key it's in, find out what key has all those notes in. I'm guessing you'll be using a blues scale as it has D, D#, AND E, so that will be the 4th, b5th, and 5th of the scale. this means that you must be in A minor, using the a blues scale, which usues the notes:
A C D D# E G A, and the F# is an accidental (a note not from the scale/key). but hey, if it sounds good then it is good.

hope i've made this much clearer now.
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#9
Okay, I was reading over your post a few times and kinda confused myself but think I've clarified that you start the pattern at the second note, right? ie., A B C# D E F# G# A, the "tone tone semitone" etc. pattern begins at B, right? Because I started it counting A as the first tone and it didn't make sense with the jump at B->C#, but now it does when starting at B. Correct?

Thanks a lot for your explanation, it really helped me. I'm guessing that most of this boils down to memorization and just getting familiar with the various scales and chords, right? I mean, to kind of "know" which notes/scales/etc. you're playing, it's just having a knowledge base. It just seems a bit daunting like anything to learn at first

So if you could help me with a familar example, taking just the first part of the Stairway to Heaven solo:

|----5---------------------|----8-8-8b--8p5------8-10p8--------------|
|------8-5-----------------|-8b-------------8/10--------10-8----8h10-|
|-7b-------7-5---7-5-------|---------------------------------10------|
|--------------7-----7-5---|-----------------------------------------|
|------------------------8-|-----------------------------------------|
|--------------------------|-----------------------------------------|


Which scale is that? It is not Blues scale I don't think? How exactly would you guess with this one? Really appreciate your help!!!
#10
That bit from Stairway is a mix of A minor pentatonic and A minor natural
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