#1
Hey, Im Matt, and ive been playing 7 months.

all i have been doing since i started was concentrating on lead techiniques and speed, playing songs, playing load and playing fast ; Sex Drugs Rock N' Roll.

But now im wanting more and more theory! im considering buying some more books on theory so if anybody knows any good ones please point some out thankyou.

Question 1
In my chord book, underneath some of the chords it states 'MOVEABLE', what exactly does this mean? For E.g - some chords it says moveable under are - F Maj, F7, F Min, C Min 7, E Sus 2, G Min, G Min 7, G Maj 7, etcetc.

Question 2
How and When is a scale enharmonically correct?

Question 3
Can I Build, say a F# Scale or a F Minor scale By using the formulae TTSTTTS? if not, how and why?


thankyou to anybody who remotly answers my questions!
#2
A movable chord is a chord you can move up and down the neck of the guitar.
Barre chords are a good example of these.

Enharmonic means when a scale uses ALL the available notes.
For example:
C Major: C D E F G A B C - > This is enharmonically correct because its uses all the notes A through to G.

However, Take the C Minor scale:C D Eb F G Ab Bb C -> that is also enharmonically correct.
But if you change Eb to D#, and Ab to G# so it looks like:
C D D# F G G# Bb C

That is enharmonically incorrect, because it doesnt use all the notes (There are two D and G notes).


Question 3:
You can build the Major scale by using W W H W W W H.
however, for every other scale, you should use intervals.
Been away, am back
#3
movable chords-you can move that particular shape to create a new note for example a major barcode on the 3rd fret of the low e would be a G, move it up to the 5th fret and its an A. open chords wouldnt be movable because they use open strings.
#4
Quote by Logz
A movable chord is a chord you can move up and down the neck of the guitar.
Barre chords are a good example of these.

Enharmonic means when a scale uses ALL the available notes.
For example:
C Major: C D E F G A B C - > This is enharmonically correct because its uses all the notes A through to G.

However, Take the C Minor scale:C D Eb F G Ab Bb C -> that is also enharmonically correct.
But if you change Eb to D#, and Ab to G# so it looks like:
C D D# F G G# Bb C

That is enharmonically incorrect, because it doesnt use all the notes (There are two D and G notes).


Question 3:
You can build the Major scale by using W W H W W W H.
however, for every other scale, you should use intervals.


thanks a ton man!
#5
moving chords means you can move the shape up and down the neck of the guitar and get the same chord type just with a different root. For example... you have the F7...you can take that and move it up 2 fretts and get the G7...or down one frett and get the E7...understand?
#7
Moveable, if it dhows you a chord diagram, would that be the chords 1st position... but it has other positions up the neck? or am i getting this confused with something else lol
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#9
No disagreement with the definition of 'moveable'. Let's talk learning theory. I hope all the guys on this post don't throw stuff at me, but here goes:

I found the understanding of theory, on the mental level to be easier on the piano. It's extremely linear and doesn't confuse you with the horizontal and vertical aspects of understanding the guitar neck. Remember, I'm talking using a keyboard to understand the concepts.

Once you get the concepts on the keyboard, which should be real fast. Apply it to the guitar.

Now, the major difference between the guitar and the keyboard (mentally) is this; transcribing (changing) keys on the keyboard is more difficult. This is because when I change keys, the piano keys that were once white are now black, etc.

On the guitar, once you understand the theory and the positions on the guitar neck for 1 key, changing keys is merely a matter of physically moving everything to the new positions on the neck. The fingerings remain the same, as long as you move everything together. So, if you learned a song in A Major and want to play it in B Major, just slide EVERYTHING up 2 frets and all your chords and scales will have the exact same fingerings as A Major, just in the new position.

So, I guess what I'm saying is that ,for me, theory was easier on the piano, but playing on the fly afterwards has been easier on the guitar.

Can I stop ducking now?
Jam On!