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#5
Harmonic Minor is typically used along with the natural minor scale. For instance, Am G F E7 is a common progression where you would play A natural minor over the first three chirds and A harmonic minor over E7.
#6
The dominant 7th chord or the 7# diminished. In the key of A minor, it would be E7 or G#dim.

The other chords would be Am, Bm, C, Dm, E7, F, G

Not quite

The chords for natural minor would be
Am Bdim C Dm Em F G

The chords for harmonic minor would be
Am Bdim Caug Dm E7 F G#dim
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Quote by MudMartin
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#7
if you play E7 you'll get a E phrygian dominant sound rather than a A harmonic minor... phrygian dominant has a major 3rd so it won't sound dark like the harmonic minor.
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#8
Quote by Ænimus Prime
Not quite

The chords for natural minor would be
Am Bdim C Dm Em F G

The chords for harmonic minor would be
Am Bdim Caug Dm E7 F G#dim

Yeah, I know. I said both E7 and G#dim because natural and harmonic minor walk hand in hand, they're most likely gonna both be used. Oops actually I missed a few chords also...
Last edited by one vision at Jul 3, 2008,
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You sure about that? I (and many others) think it sounds pretty friggin' dark.


oh well, i guess its maybe because I play the major 3rd a lot. But hey, if you make it sound dark, than it is lol.
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#12
^Major third isn't used in the minor scale.
Quote by tearsinheaven13
whats a good chord to play under the harmonic minor scale?
Any minor chord played after or before a dominant chord 5 semitones down from the minor chord or 7 semitones up from the minor chord. Basically any progression that has this i-V7.

Quote by Ænimus Prime
The chords for harmonic minor would be
Am Bdim Caug Dm E7 F G#dim
Not quite. The C chord could either be augmented or major, usually augmented. And the B diminished chord is sometimes played as a B minor (I'd play it as a B minor).
#13
Quote by demonofthenight
^Major third isn't used in the minor scale.

Any minor chord played after or before a dominant chord 5 semitones down from the minor chord or 7 semitones up from the minor chord. Basically any progression that has this i-V7.

Not quite. The C chord could either be augmented or major, usually augmented. And the B diminished chord is sometimes played as a B minor (I'd play it as a B minor).


He was talking about Phrygian Dominant. Contextplz.

Dandy.

C and Bm would both technically be out of key. If you're strictly in harmonic minor, they would be aug and dim, respectively.
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#14
Any chord containing the natural 7th. V7, iidim7, ivdim7, even a vi(technically a VIsus#2 though) all bring out the tonality of the harmonic minor.
#16
Quote by mike
Not quite. The C chord could either be augmented or major, usually augmented. And the B diminished chord is sometimes played as a B minor (I'd play it as a B minor).
I gave the chords you get when you harmonise the harmonic minor scale, C and Bm aren't in it.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#17
Quote by Ænimus Prime
harmonise
British spelling alert!

Quote by ouchies

lol what about a maj7 ?
What about it? You wouldn't play A harmonic minor over Amaj7.


Edit: Prime.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jul 3, 2008,
#19
Quote by Sue
What about it? You wouldn't play A harmonic minor over Amaj7
First you call me a pom, then you put my name to someone else's words. I NEVER use 'lol'
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#22
Quote by ouchies
^ you said any chord with a natural seventh will bring out the tonality of harmonic minor.

a maj7 chord has a natural 7 but doesn't bring out the tonality of harmonic minor.
Any chord within harmonic minor that has the natural 7th. Happy?
#24
You could try a minor progression in A harmonic minor like:

Dm9 E7 (or Em9 if you want to revert back to natural minor) Ammaj7

That's a iv V i minor progression, and sounds quite nice and jazz like if you rake the chords slowly or arpeggiate them.
Last edited by mdc at Jul 7, 2008,
#25
Quote by ouchies
^ Don't throw a hissy fit, I was seriously confused. But I get what you meant now
LOL, sorry that came off a lot angrier than I meant. The internet does that sometimes.
#26
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
C and Bm would both technically be out of key. If you're strictly in harmonic minor, they would be aug and dim, respectively.
When writing minor progressions you dont have to keep strictly in key, not many guys would if they were using the bIII chord or the ii chord. Anyway, the bIII+ chord is barely used, as augmented chords sound ick.

This is why I suggest major scales over minor scales. In a major progression you only need to use those 7 chords harmonised from the major scale, you could even pick those chords using a pair of dice and it still wouldnt sound too bad). Writing progressions in minor scales requires a much deeper understanding of how chords relate to each other.
#27
Also, you can use harmonic minor over a mM7 chord. For example, an AmM7 has notes A C E G#, so you could make an argument for the fact that a mM7 chord is the defining chord of the harmonic minor scale.
#28
Quote by :-D
Also, you can use harmonic minor over a mM7 chord. For example, an AmM7 has notes A C E G#, so you could make an argument for the fact that a mM7 chord is the defining chord of the harmonic minor scale.
mM7 chords sound sort of off. What situation would you use them for?
#29
Quote by demonofthenight
mM7 chords sound sort of off. What situation would you use them for?

I don't normally use them; you could probably get an interesting sound by doing some kind of pitch axis thing using something like Am-AmM7-Am7-Am6.
#30
I guess you're kind of in luck. One of my favorite songs of my group utilizes the harmonic minor scale. To differentiate it from the natural minor, I have a major fifth.
The main progression for the aforementioned song is Am-E-Am-E-Dm-E
Its one of my favorite scales, too. Widely used in my musical tradition.
#31
Quote by mike
mM7 chords sound sort of off. What situation would you use them for?
When you want to sound 'sort of off'

Quote by :-D-|-<
using something like Am-AmM7-Am7-Am6
I was going to give tha example as well. Does anyone else see building's falling down in black and white when you hear this?
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#32
Quote by Andy!!!!!!!!!!!!
I was going to give tha example as well. Does anyone else see building's falling down in black and white when you hear this?

Now that you mention it, yes, I do; good visual.
#34
Quote by one vision
Do mM7's actually exist? Or are they named that just in case anyone is adventurous to use them? I've never seem em in context.

No, they exist. I'm sure you can find them somewhere.
#35
Quote by demonofthenight
mM7 chords sound sort of off. What situation would you use them for?


Post #24 was obvioulsy completely ignored by :-D. They're only used in minor chord progressions.
#36
Quote by mdc
Post #24 was obvioulsy completely ignored by :-D. They're only used in minor chord progressions.
Minor progressions require the progression to resolve to the minor i chord. The only chord in the minor scale that can be a mM7 chord is the i chord. But the mM7 chord contains alot of dissonance and also the leading tone, so theres no resolution, therefore the chord cant really be used in minor chord progressions.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#37
Quote by :-D
No, they exist. I'm sure you can find them somewhere.


I recall an article in GT by Pete Callard entirely on the mM7, excellent little piece, and he pointed them out in a number of common progressions.
#38
Quote by demonofthenight
Minor progressions require the progression to resolve to the minor i chord. The only chord in the minor scale that can be a mM7 chord is the i chord. But the mM7 chord contains alot of dissonance and also the leading tone, so theres no resolution, therefore the chord cant really be used in minor chord progressions.


Mistake then. I should have changed 'only' to 'commonly found in'. It's probably not used as a resolve chord anyway when in the middle of a song...
#39
But it's a hard chord to make it sound 'right' in a progression. That's why many jazz standards (where minor harmony is mostly harmonic minor) use just a regular minor or minor7 chord.

The only situation I can think of now where the chord is really being called for is Am - AmM7 - Am7 - Am6.

Maybe someone can let me hear an example of how you can get the chord to sound right in a V- i way?
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#40
Quote by elvenkindje


Maybe someone can let me hear an example of how you can get the chord to sound right in a V- i way?


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It is hard to get it to sound right. Very much depends on the accompanying harmony I guess.
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