#1
first, please answer this.

since every note from a to b besides the sharps and flats are in the c major scale, the octaves or any note on the fretboard for that matter, in the c major scale?

if that is true, please explain to me what a pattern is.
#2
Any place you play the notes C D E F G A B on the fretboard is acceptable for a C major scale. It is vital to your understanding of later theory that you understand the concept that scales are not restricted to patterns, positions, or box shapes.

However, patterns are often useful to know as they provide a convenient fingering of the notes in a scale where every note is close to the others.
#3
Quote by jammy jam jam
first, please answer this.

since every note from a to b besides the sharps and flats are in the c major scale, the octaves or any note on the fretboard for that matter, in the c major scale?

NO not everynote on the fret board is in the CMAJ scale there are sharps and flats on the fretboard the C alone could considered a couple different notes such as a diminished D for example.

if that is true, please explain to me what a pattern is.

yes because there are only 7 notes in the major scale it is a constant. so it forma a pattern and every MAJ key will have the same pattern but not the same notes, and won't be in the exact same spot




answer in bold
#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Sublime, please explain your post in more detail. I know this stuff, but what you said confused me.


well its fairly straight forward, and tisk tisk on the ego there
what i can deduce from his response is that just because a note or notes may fall in the C major scale, it does not imply that the tonal center is C major which is correct and he simply gave an example of the note C beloning to a D diminished scale too.

the second part simply says that there is a system to there being a pattern to the major scale. While there are many many ways to play a major scale depending on where the player begins and where they want to end, there is an overall pattern to it. It's called the major scale system.

I generally agree with everything he wrote in that fairly simple response.
Quote by :-D
I go to college with mattrsg1; for what it's worth he is the best guitarist I have heard in person, and in particular stands out from others in my age group. You will not be disappointed, honestly.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJpCZpysf94
#7
ok i have another question. and i probably have like 543254356 more that don't come in mind, but in a common major barre chord, where you have the middle finger on the G string, i tried it in the 5th position, which would be the c major (i think), the middle finger is a C# which isn't in the c maj scale. and i know this is a silly question but i remember barre chords without the middle finger, in this one do you simply just take it out? ( i bet this has something to do with modes, which i'm not familiar with.) ?
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Please quote my post for the coded TAB template and tab out the chord in question.


e--5-
B--5-
G--6-
D--7-
A--7-
E--5-

ya see how the 6 on the g string is a C#, and not part of the c maj scale?
#11
A 5 fret barre chord would be an Amaj, and the C# on the G string is the 3rd. It actually has nothing to do with modes, it's just the third step of the major scale. This, along with the A and E notes create an Amaj triad. If you lower the C#, you get a C natural (I don't know how to make the symbol), or a m3 in the A major scale. The A E C triad is an A minor barre chord. Hope this helped.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

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#12
ohh ok thank you, i should've known because of the root note.

sorry, you dont have to answer all my questions, im just trying to get things together.
what do you mean by it being a triad? ive learned that a major triad contains scale degrees 1.3 and 5:


d-2-
a-4-
e-5-


A,C, and E. but thats all the further i ever got. triads always confused me.
#14
Quote by :-D
^You mean A C# E, but a triad is simply a three note chord. It is what the name implies.

oh yeah, C#. sorry. but he said that an A major triad is an A barre chord

EDIT: or did he mean that the a barre chord contains a triad? but what does that mean besides that it happens to contain a triad? i don't know, i'm confused.
Last edited by jammy jam jam at Jul 2, 2008,
#15
Quote by jammy jam jam
oh yeah, C#. sorry. but he said that an A major triad is an A barre chord

It is; it only contains the notes A C# and E.
#17
Quote by jammy jam jam
ooh ok ok i see now, thank you!

You're welcome; remember that it doesn't matter how many times the same note appears in the chord, you're just counting each different tone.
#19
Quote by jammy jam jam
ok so they're all the same notes, just more of 'em

Yes, exactly. An A major barre chord is the same chord as
e----------------------
B--5--------------------
G--6--------------------
D--7--------------------
A----------------------
E----------------------


but has a fuller sound.
#21
Quote by bangoodcharlote
In theory, the two chords are interchangeable, but in reality, the barre chord's fuller sound is often not desired in a large jazz band.

Which all too many people fail to realize. Shell voicings = friends.