#1
Ok i know the first few steps

Make a band

Make Music

Realize your vision

Record your music at a studio


ok now i dont know


whats next?

how do i make a big jump to record deal?
#2
Make EPK

Send EPK to every label you can think of/find

Wait for response...

No response, play more shows, develop fan base

repeat sending of EPK

pretty much do this over and over again
This water's dark and coldGod's not where you hopedThis moment come and goneIt's time we all moved on
#3
epk?

is the smart people talk for demo?


EDIT: how would i send them to a record deal? mail it or drop by there office or what?
#4
you have to play a few shows, if you haven't played live and know what your doing they wont sign you

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#6
Quote by amazing FretMan
epk?

is the smart people talk for demo?


EDIT: how would i send them to a record deal? mail it or drop by there office or what?


EPK = Electronic Press Kit

includes a Demo, perhaps a video, some images a bio and a cover letter of sorts...all on a cd

Just mail it to them, unless their local, then you can drop it off if you want
This water's dark and coldGod's not where you hopedThis moment come and goneIt's time we all moved on
#7
send demos to the A&R department of every label you can find that does your type of music, and unless you are some kind of weird studio only band, make sure you have a very tight, killer live show. You don't necessarily need a full press kit, but make sure you have a website (get a real website, not just myspace, having a myspace is good but having your own site is much more professional and leaves a better impression, at least if it's somewhat competently designed) and include the URL with the demo.

Also your demo should be your four best songs.


Not sucking helps a whole lot too.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Jul 3, 2008,
#8
only 4 songs on the demo? i thought it had to be atleast 6

anymore words of wisdom?

this is alot of help guys
#9
Quote by amazing FretMan
only 4 songs on the demo? i thought it had to be atleast 6



That depends,

Do you have 6 GREAT songs?

The first rule is to present your best, if you only have 2 GREAT songs, only use two. If you're confident you have 6 GREAT songs use all six. But if their not excellent the A&R guys won't get past the first song. Which would end up being a huge waste of money on your part...

That's about all there is to it, just persist
This water's dark and coldGod's not where you hopedThis moment come and goneIt's time we all moved on
#10
we have over 30 songs....and that i can think of off the top of my head we have 7 great great ones...some are ok but they have all had positive feed back
#11
Quote by amazing FretMan
we have over 30 songs....and that i can think of off the top of my head we have 7 great great ones...some are ok but they have all had positive feed back


Essentially what you want to do is use songs that

a. present your diversity
b. show prowess
c. exhibit musical sense and structure
and d. are marketable to a broad audience

Labels want to spend as little money on you as possible at first, if you can already arrange/write/record great music they'll jump at the chance to work with you because they'll have less to pay for production etc.

This doesn't mean songs that have 'that one awesome part'

This means songs that night after night you see people marveling over.

You can't imagine how mediocre some peoples perception of excellence is, and I'd know, the studio I work in part time receives 10-15 demos a day and 90% of them sound the same.
This water's dark and coldGod's not where you hopedThis moment come and goneIt's time we all moved on
#13
Quote by amazing FretMan
would putting a cover on the demo be a bad idea?


Yeah.

I mean if it's not a song people always cover like Master of Puppets or something and you really put your own angle to it, I.E rearranged the whole thing so it sounds completely different, then maybe put it at the very end.

But generally you're trying to show them that you can write your own music well, so why would you put someone else's song on there?
#14
only go for a label when your ready, remember, if you get to the point of actually getting a decent label, and are reasonably successful, there will be critics, journalists and frankly just plain ass-holes who will go out of they're way to spread rumors about you and your family.
once your ready to accept the possibility of that, then you will be ready for a label.
#15
Quote by metallicafan616
you have to play a few shows, if you haven't played live and know what your doing they wont sign you


Not necessarily. Gnarls Barkley had a number 1 single before they/he/she/it had even played a gig.
#16
I'll add more later, but two things for now:

3 original songs max. If they want more than that, they'll ask. You'll be lucky if they listen to three. You may think you have 7 awesome songs, but statistically, you don't. Go with three.

Nobody has mentioned this, yet.... move to where the industry is. Yep. Pack your sh!t and go to LA, New York, Nashville, wherever the industry in your genre is. You want to get noticed? You have to be in their faces and on their radar. Let's say it might be advantageous to meet Bob Rock or Quincy Jones or whatever. What do you think the odds are of meeting someone like that in Iowa? None. What if you go and live in the city they live in and travel in the same circles where they frequent - the same music stores, the same clubs, the same coffee shop, etc. Volunteer to wash their car or cut their grass. They HAVE to notice you. You pretty much HAVE to go there.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
im moving to Hollywood in a few years but i dont know where my music scene would be

as far as my knowledge is all that is popular in the mainstream or whatever is emo/screamo stuff and stuff....like grindcore etc.

i play a more vintaged rock that have roots to them and stuff so i dont know where i would even fit in with todays society of music
#18
Quote by amazing FretMan
im moving to Hollywood in a few years but i dont know where my music scene would be

as far as my knowledge is all that is popular in the mainstream or whatever is emo/screamo stuff and stuff....like grindcore etc.

i play a more vintaged rock that have roots to them and stuff so i dont know where i would even fit in with todays society of music

You really don't know much about what's popular.
#19
If you want a serious label to recognize your band you need to demonstrate the following:

1. Ability to tour
2. Consistantly draw fans to your performances
3. Ability to sell you own music

The only way to show you have these skills is to actually do them yourself. Getting a record deal is a lot like borrowing money. You have to prove you don't need it before you can get it.
#20
Quote by amazing FretMan
im moving to Hollywood in a few years but i dont know where my music scene would be

as far as my knowledge is all that is popular in the mainstream or whatever is emo/screamo stuff and stuff....like grindcore etc.

i play a more vintaged rock that have roots to them and stuff so i dont know where i would even fit in with todays society of music

Dont worry about style nowadays, theres large amounts of fans for every genre.
#21
Quote by tagyoureit
If you want a serious label to recognize your band you need to demonstrate the following:

1. Ability to tour
2. Consistantly draw fans to your performances
3. Ability to sell you own music

The only way to show you have these skills is to actually do them yourself. Getting a record deal is a lot like borrowing money. You have to prove you don't need it before you can get it.


As much as I agree with this, there is one small point to add. Those three things you pointed out demonstrate that your product is already making money, and is therefore worth investing in for the record company.

What it comes down to is just that - convincing the record company that you and your product are worth their investment of time and money.

Where is your market? Just off the cuff, in the US, I'd say LA and NY. Hollywood is as good a place as any, I suppose. I was going to ask "why wait a few years? Why not now?" and then I looked up your profile and found that you're 16. Okay. Makes sense. In the pop music game, there is no time to screw around. If you don't make it by 25, you won't - at least not in the wide-sweeping 'pop' genre that cranks out the top-10 hits. Subgenres are another matter.

Back to "where is your market?" Find *popular* bands who are doing now (or at least very recently) what you envision yourself doing. Where are they based out of? No, don't tell me that Franz Ferdinand was from some small town outside of Las Vegas Nevada, or that Big Huge Band was from small-town Ohio. Where are they based out of NOW? Even if they were from a smaller market, there is a reason why they moved. You'll probably find that they tend to live in the same places. THAT is where you need to go.

If relocating sounds extreme (not that you have indicated, but considering there are others reading this too.... the lurkers....), consider this: Many, many people pack up a car-load of belongings to move off to college, right? Why? Because what they want to learn, and the people they want to learn from are based in another town! Same thing! Instead of spending 4-5 years attending college in South Carolina or whatever, you're going to spend *at least that long* developing your network of connections, establishing a reputation, and developing your craft.

Still sound like too much? Then don't bother. You're not cut out for it. Stay close to home, go to a local college, and get a job in your hometown, marry your highschool sweet-heart and be happy.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
Or.. Make Black Metal, and join the scandinavian Black Metal underground.
If you're evil enough, you will have yourself a deal quite fast.

... That was so un-needed. Sorries.


Hil
#23
Quote by amazing FretMan
we have over 30 songs....and that i can think of off the top of my head we have 7 great great ones...some are ok but they have all had positive feed back



Heres something about record companies.

They will usually only listen to about the first 30 seconds of your first song if you just send it in to them, they have hundreds of people sending them stuff on a daily basis. if they like what they here in the first 30 seconds or so, they may continue listening or just put in a pile of good ones. If you meet with them (good luck) they may listen through a song or two and tell you their opinion on them.

Another thing is if you continue to play shows, the record companies will usually find you. They're always looking out for the next big thing, if they see you playing a show, and see a few hundred people singing along or just screaming their heads off, they may talk to you, and you'll go from there.

A good thing to do is just get a large fan base, so that way, even if you don't get signed (many bands don't) you can atleast record and sell stuff yourself.
#24
dude u have to go on tour first, record deals come way after, a label wants to see experience from u, thats where the long hard road comes into play, tour whatever side of the states or canada u are on for a few months take a break and see what happens, write some more tunes, rinse and repeat, its not easy to do but it isn't impossible
#25
Quote by amazing FretMan
my new band has only played live once..but i have played live 5 times


Thats good that you have experiance but it really matters how many times your band has if your looking to get signed
#26
You need to be gigging quite a bit. Travel around for gigs, tour, get your name spread out. If you dont, then there are less people who have heard you, less people that liked you, and less chance of a record company knowing you exist.