#1
I play guitar but I know very little to nothing about this brand..
I was clearing out my attic a couple of hours ago and found an extremely mashed up Landola sl-23 from the early 70s. Apparently it hasn't been touched in over two decades but amazingly, the four strings that are still attached are still in perfect tune.
Does anyone think it's worth getting restrung? Or is it a piece of complete junk that I should just throw out.
#2
Well,in my opinion I'd sort it out (strings are only £6) and if nothing else use it for slide guitar. My opinion is that old guitars have a certain charm about them
#3
Quote by _Tim_
Well,in my opinion I'd sort it out (strings are only £6) and if nothing else use it for slide guitar. My opinion is that old guitars have a certain charm about them

id say any guitar is worth donig up for £6. even if its a sparefor when your main guitar breaks a ffew strings and you cant be arsed to re-string it.
#4
Yeah,that's a good point ^.

If the repairs it needs (if any) exceed the value of the instrument I wouldn't say it's worth it,
#5
Those are some good points
This thing is in a pretty bad state.. it's chipped, scratched, a little burnt in a couple of places.. (don't ask me how ) but the damage seems somewhat superficial and the tone (of the A string at least, haha) is actually pretty nice. It sounds warm, I think it's worth some some new strings.
#6
Quote by lemondust
Those are some good points
This thing is in a pretty bad state.. it's chipped, scratched, a little burnt in a couple of places.. (don't ask me how ) but the damage seems somewhat superficial and the tone (of the A string at least, haha) is actually pretty nice. It sounds warm, I think it's worth some some new strings.

Pics?
#7
Needless to say it's not the prettiest or most fragrant instrument I've had the pleasure of holding.


#9
This is a wonderful instrument! I have an SL-23 too, and of my 12 guitars it's the one I use most often. It probably was a quite cheap guitar when it was made, guess the top is laminate. But the sound is fantastic, warm and mellow. If the neck is still straight, you have found a guitar you will probably play every day for the rest of your life.
#10
I have Landola guitar, which my father has bought sometimes in the late 70's.
sounds great nearly forty years later
#11
Be sure to put nylon strings on it when you do. It's a classical and can't hande the tension of steel strings.
#12
Pity the rosette area is so chewed up; doesn't look like pick damage. The top looks like it's nice and flat, no bridge pulling or anything going on.
I'd say clean it up, re-string it, and enjoy.
Likely not worth attempting what would be a rather expensive repair job.