#1
is there really a tonal difference between stainless steel or standard fret wire. i know that there is a life difference but if there's not a brighter sound it doesn't seem to be worth the extra money.
#2
i wouldnt get the stainless or standard if was ordering from Warmoth. the difference is probably very minimal. i would get the gold because it looks nice as **** and no one else has it!
Peavey XXX combo *upgraded screen resistors, Tung-Sol's, and 6L6's*
Schecter Syn Std. * modded, scalloped, and worn*
Schecter C-1 Elite *still sexy*
Ibanez AEL 12-string

"He who sticks his dick in peanut butter is fucking nuts"
#3
Some say there is a huge difference. Never had the 2 side by side to compare them. Ive put stainless in all my guitars not for any tone difference. But because stainless frets last 5 or 6 times longer than nickel/steel frets. And Im really hard on the regular frets. But I dont think its going to make some night day difference in tone, unless your eric johnson.
#4
theres no tonal difference. a fret is so small that it doesnt matter what type of metal its made of. if tone was a big factor, frets would be made out of brass. dont get stainless steel, if you try to level your frets and crown them, youll be buying all new tools. if you take it to a shop to have it done, you will pay twice as much.
#5
Quote by LP Addict
theres no tonal difference. a fret is so small that it doesnt matter what type of metal its made of. if tone was a big factor, frets would be made out of brass. dont get stainless steel, if you try to level your frets and crown them, youll be buying all new tools. if you take it to a shop to have it done, you will pay twice as much.



BUT they are more slippery! i.e., smoother bends and easier vibrato. I'm a vibrato/bends user and abuser, and when it comes to making fretts smooth, clean, and extremely well kempt and polished, I'm pretty sure there's no-one more anal about it than me. Stainless matters in that regard as well.
#6
no they are not more slippery. if you polish them the same, they will be the same. same thing with woods, you sand oak to 1000 grit, you sand maple to 1000 grit, each will be just as smooth. stainless steel is jus ta marketing gimmick. yes it lasts longer, but it takes years of constant playing to need any fretwork done in the first place. and it will cost double when you get fretwork done on it.
#7
There's an interesting article on Ed Roman's website about stainless steel frets. I couldn't give an opinion because I haven't spent enough time with it, but it's very interesting reading.
#8
Quote by Dreamality
There's an interesting article on Ed Roman's website about stainless steel frets. I couldn't give an opinion because I haven't spent enough time with it, but it's very interesting reading.



you or anyoen else probably wont believe me when i say this, but ed roman doesnt know anything about guitars, he makes opinions based off of the ability to make money on his guitars. bolt on necks are easier for him to CnC cut, so he gives a big rant about how set-necks are low quality and terrible neck joints... i know this for a fact, i am indirect acquaintances . my old shop owner did alot of work with him/for him. and i know the guy who used to do the finish work for him
#9
True stainless is harder metal to work. As for fret lasting a while it depends. The asian guitars have soft, cheap frets they tend to go pretty quick. American made stuff lasts longer. It depends on your playing style. If you have a real light touch then regular frets will last a long time. Me I can tear up the frets on a squire in a few weeks. Alot of shops wont even mess with stainless. And it does cost more warmoth wont do stainless on a bound fretboard at all. I can understand why I did my epi LP and its a real pain to do and not tear up the binding.
And Ive read ed romans rants, he has alot of opinions that have little factual backing, he says it so its gotta be true. A legend in his own little world. Hes just a business man and salesman so therefore would tell you up was down if it needed to seal a deal.
Some really like stainless frets some wont use em. So its just preference.
#10
Quote by LP Addict
no they are not more slippery. if you polish them the same, they will be the same. same thing with woods, you sand oak to 1000 grit, you sand maple to 1000 grit, each will be just as smooth. stainless steel is jus ta marketing gimmick. yes it lasts longer, but it takes years of constant playing to need any fretwork done in the first place. and it will cost double when you get fretwork done on it.


+1

This man speaks truth.
#11
listen to LP Addict on this one.
Gibson SG Faded
Epi VJ Stack


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Whenever I clean my guitars, my family wonders why it smells so good; I say that I exude a fresh citrus scent from hidden orifices.
They stopped asking
#12
Garrr my ignorance shines through yet again, unsuccesful in it's attempts to hide behind my pridefully kept opinions! Poo. Everyone should listen to LP Addict, he's the master.
#13
I think LP Addict misunderstood me. I never said I agreed with Ed Roman. I said it was interesting reading. I've known Ed for 20 years. He's in my opinion not a very nice person, but having said that he's made "a guitar or two" and I'm willing to at least listen to his side of the story. He doesn't just do bolt ons. That's ridiculous. I have a custom guitar he made me in '90 that's a neck through. Great guitar, but I wouldn't do biz with him again. Ed Roman is also a Les Paul hater which is another reason why alot of people don't respect him.
#15
I take it this isn't the case then for neck-throughs? There seem to be a lot of these myths floating around and people never seem to agree...

To be honest though, I don't doubt that most things on a guitar would only make a negligable difference in tone. Woods, pickups and strings probably being the main exceptions(?).
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#16
bolt on produces the best resonation. wood on wood with no glue joint (kills your high-end transfer of vibration, which is why gibsons are known for warmth and bassy tones, not because of mahogany which is the myth). bolts do nothing to decrease the vibration, therefore bolt on is the best for a natural guitar tone, set neck/neckthrough is est for warm tones, wood hardly hardly matters, its more the PIECE of wood that mattters, not the type of wood.
#17
wood hardly hardly matters, its more the PIECE of wood that matters, not the type of wood.

I respectfully would say most luthiers and acousticians would not agree with that statement. If you take a Tele made of pine and one made of mahogany, they would definitely sound and sustain different. They both have different wood densities and resonate at different frequencies. Why do you think acoustic guitars with a spruce top and mahogany sides and back sound different from one made of cedar?

"Differentials in wood density affect vibration and therefore sound quality"
Berend C. Stoel1*, Terry M. Borman2

1 Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands , 2 Borman Violins, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States of America

Now, once we distinguish that the type of wood matters, then we reach the next challenge which is the exact piece of wood and how even the density is.