#1
Hey guys I am looking for a routine to practice in hopes of achieving more from my practice times and reach a higher skill level. I was wondering if you had any recommendations to improve what I do. This is very rough outline of it because I am not very organized yet when it comes to practice so any ideas would be greatly appreciated. But this is what I do.


1.Warm Up Stretch run chromatic scale up to the 2nd octave and back down.
2. Steve Vai 10 hour work out (Just started this) I do the first 6 figures ten times each. Only a measure of rest after the tenth of each.
3. I just found the exercise of Doom pt 1 so I am doing that now.
4. I run scales with a metronome for a bit. But I am going to start like dissecting each scale if that makes sense to you.
5. Arpeggios The ones I do know that is.
6. Chords I do 7th chords 9th chords. I am not very good at them but thats what practice is for.
7. Try to sit and read on theory things
8. Songs.

I usually practice 40 minutes to an hour at a time then take a break. Would you recommend doing that or straight practice like 4 hour sessions. Also would you reccomend in those session focus on only one thing or split it up says 15 minutes scales/15 arpeggios/etc...

Thanks Guys Sorry for the long post I searched and didnt see anything that really helped me.
#2
I did something like that a while ago and it helped me a lot, but it stucked me in terms of composition. You should also take a break and play other styles of music to add it's color (style) to yourself. In arpeggios, clean up your sweeps in the ones that you know and learn new ones. I think you should split your routine for each skill ex. arpeggios- rest, songs-rest etc. And practice challenging songs not easy ones, unless you like them a lot hahaha. Also, you can use the scale licks in the 10 hour workout to pracice with a metronome and eliminate warm-ups and scale, because that's what the 10 hour workuot is about, so you can do everything at the same time and save practice time.
#4
Nerd Alert!

Play Cliffs of Dover and Manhattan daily. This is all the warm up you need.


P.S. Quit being a dweeby bastard
#5
Quote by Free Time
Nerd Alert!

Play Cliffs of Dover and Manhattan daily. This is all the warm up you need.


P.S. Quit being a dweeby bastard

Ignore him. If you can follow your schedule for a good month, then you will deffinately show some improvement. I think that you should put a greater focus on what you feel is more important, but don't neglect anything. For instance, if you really wanted to practice sweep picking, put a good hour of work into each day. But don't neglect your arpeggio and chord studies, because knowing the theory side of any technique is invaluable!
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

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#6
Just noticed, where is creating songs and improvising? No point doing all of that if you arn't going to include these 2 things.
#7
i used to just do steve vai workouts all the time. now i usually do a range of things to warm up, chords, some sweeps, alternate picking, tapping, finger stretches and some scales . I much prefer to play songs though now. i normally just do all the warmup stuff for about 15 minutes
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#8
Quote by Ht666
Just noticed, where is creating songs and improvising? No point doing all of that if you arn't going to include these 2 things.


I just downloaded Band In a box to practice my improve that is usually with the songs. And creating songs I will add thanks for the additions.
#9
make sure you extend your repertoire as well.
Youtube covers

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#10
How good is your ear?
You could add some ear training to your daily schedule. I say this a lot but I really believe a great ear will serve you better than great technique or great knowledge of theory.
Just a thought.

Oh and split it up so you practice everything for a minimum amount each day. You might focus on something different each day though and extend that particular area of work to go longer but not at the expense of the other things.

10 mins a day is better than an hour once a week.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Jul 4, 2008,
#11
Quote by Myung'sMusicman
Hey guys I am looking for a routine to practice in hopes of achieving more from my practice times and reach a higher skill level. I was wondering if you had any recommendations to improve what I do. This is very rough outline of it because I am not very organized yet when it comes to practice so any ideas would be greatly appreciated. But this is what I do.


1.Warm Up Stretch run chromatic scale up to the 2nd octave and back down.
2. Steve Vai 10 hour work out (Just started this) I do the first 6 figures ten times each. Only a measure of rest after the tenth of each.
3. I just found the exercise of Doom pt 1 so I am doing that now.
4. I run scales with a metronome for a bit. But I am going to start like dissecting each scale if that makes sense to you.
5. Arpeggios The ones I do know that is.
6. Chords I do 7th chords 9th chords. I am not very good at them but thats what practice is for.
7. Try to sit and read on theory things
8. Songs.

I usually practice 40 minutes to an hour at a time then take a break. Would you recommend doing that or straight practice like 4 hour sessions. Also would you reccomend in those session focus on only one thing or split it up says 15 minutes scales/15 arpeggios/etc...

Thanks Guys Sorry for the long post I searched and didnt see anything that really helped me.

Yeah, sounds good. Practice for as long as you can pay proper attention for, then take a break. You've got the right idea.
#12
Ok I did not want to start a new thread asking a simple question. What would you guys suggest I focus the most on if I want to be able to play melodic music such as Dream Theater and Between The Buried and Me. I know it takes time and a lot of it is practice but what are the most important things to work on says more than others. Like the one guy said don't neglect anything I know that but what should i put more work on say double time.
#13
^ those guys are extremely well rounded musicians. DT can pull off just about everything because they are technically and theoretically equipped for just about everything. That's why your routine is good. If you want to sound like DT you're going to have to get seriously good at developing motifs and melodies, and have a very good grasp of theory.