#1
Im looking at the P-44. http://www.parkerguitars.com/code/models/models_pseries_p44_intro.asp

Anybody played one? From what I understand they are one of the most versitile guitar out there. They have a piezo pup for acoustics. I would play mostly rock with it, other than acoustic. I love the look of them. So different than the current guitar shapes. I am probably getting a single rectifier to go along with it.
Last edited by Kornakopia at Jul 4, 2008,
#2
I've tried one.

They're different. Very slim, very small. Not for everybody. Definitely a try before you buy guitar.


If you don't like one, take a look at Carvin, you can get alot of the same features (Stainless steel frets, piezo options...) But they don't look as original though.
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#4
I played an older model, in the 30's, at my local music store (wasn't GC) and I thought it played pretty well. It was really old though, and the bridge was starting to rust but otherwise I thought it was a pretty nice little axe.
crazy talking animals
#5
I've played a Parker Fly Deluxe before. They are amazingly well engineered guitars. Indestructible carbon fiber fretboard, stainless steel frets that last forever, and by far the best neck-through joint in a guitar (not sure about the other Parkers on this one). Piezo also adds a nice acoustic sound.

However, these guitars are NOT for everyone. The necks are super thin and the fretboard radius is a bit wide. Good for classical style players, not good for those blues players that like to really grip the neck. Also, the body might be too thin for many players. Also, unless you have a Parker with Seymour Duncans in them, the sound will SUCK ASS! Extremely low powered and lifeless pickups that CANNOT be replaced because they have to be custom designed for the ultra thin body.

Many Parker fans are dedicated, I know one guy who thinks the Mojo is objectively "the best electric guitar". Be sure to try it yourself and see if its your style.
#6
^you could always get boutique pickups if you don't like the stock ones.

I've played several. They are very nice but actually holding them felt very strange. My wife thought they were perfect for her small hands and short arms. Try one and if you like the feel then they should be good guitars for you.
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#7
Quote by Doodleface
I've tried one.

They're different. Very slim, very small. Not for everybody. Definitely a try before you buy guitar.


Definitely what I was about to say. They just feel, play, and sound so much different than most other guitars that I wouldn't ever suggest to just buy it on the spot, I personally didn't like the feel of it too much, but I have 3 friends who absolutely swear its the best feeling guitar they've touched... so 3/4 tone doctors agree that it feels great, and 4/4 agree that it sounds great.
#8
Quote by Shuk
I've played a Parker Fly Deluxe before. They are amazingly well engineered guitars. Indestructible carbon fiber fretboard, stainless steel frets that last forever, and by far the best neck-through joint in a guitar (not sure about the other Parkers on this one). Piezo also adds a nice acoustic sound.

However, these guitars are NOT for everyone. The necks are super thin and the fretboard radius is a bit wide. Good for classical style players, not good for those blues players that like to really grip the neck. Also, the body might be too thin for many players. Also, unless you have a Parker with Seymour Duncans in them, the sound will SUCK ASS! Extremely low powered and lifeless pickups that CANNOT be replaced because they have to be custom designed for the ultra thin body.

Many Parker fans are dedicated, I know one guy who thinks the Mojo is objectively "the best electric guitar". Be sure to try it yourself and see if its your style.


One of my mates has swapped out pups in his Nite Fly with Bareknuckles and it sounds rather splendid.

Anyways, I like Parker guitars too, but definitely try before you buy. Pretty unique guitars which is always nice in todays world of 10 standard guitar shapes.
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#9
ive never personally played one but my friend has a parker and he plays death metal/metalcore
#10
Just to go back to the original poster's interest in the P44. I got one yesterday. The people complaining here about the tone are either talking about different models or are trying to use the guitar wrong. This guitar sounds great, particularly for clean tones and low gain. It has a very smooth lead tone, but it has a little less gain than a lot of other guitars which makes it a litle bit more difficult to play on. The P44 doesn't have the same pickups as most of the other parkers, and as far as I can tell it's body is a bit thicker too which would make changing the pickups a bit easier. Also, I have a Nitefly SA and a P44 (imo the P44 sounds better), and have played several fly deluxes and mojos, and all of the parkers I've ever tried have played phenomenally. Also, regarding the neck profile, lots of parkers have different neck shapes, and parker classifies them in sections. For example, the fly deluxe has a "wide" neck width and a "regular" neck thickness. The P44 had a Regular neck width and a "fat" neck thickness (still not a particularly thick neck).
Last edited by TheShred201 at Jul 4, 2008,
#11
Quote by Shuk
Also, unless you have a Parker with Seymour Duncans in them, the sound will SUCK ASS! Extremely low powered and lifeless pickups that CANNOT be replaced because they have to be custom designed for the ultra thin body.
I beg to differ, the stock DMs are lovely - very clear, great signal for fx chains. SDs are splendid too, in a different way. You won't be getting oodles of drive on a low-gain amp with either anyways.

To the TS, the P44 is nothing like the Fly aside from some general design cues, and its dimensions are fairly traditional, so you shouldn't have a problem adapting to it coming from a "normal" guitar. Good body thickness, fairly usual neck profile, and standard pickup format. Nice set of features on them as well, pretty much justifies the hefty price for an import.
Fender Japan Stratocaster Ibanez Pro540 Power Ibanez Pro540 Saber Ibanez 430S Ibanez S540 Charvel LSXIII w/GraphTech Ghost MIDI Parker Fly Artist Ibanez S1220 Mesa F30 Roland GR20 Roland Microcube + IBANEZ TREMS STILL SUCK!
#12
TS you could just wait for the pro version of that..

The specs are much better!
Parker trem with piezo acoustics the far better version then the fulcrum trem (if it is a fulcrum)
Set neck rather then a bolt on.
sperzel locking tuners
Graphtech nut


I'm going to get it when it's available... Which is soon hopefully.
Be aware though, as said, the P series arn't exactly like the Parker Flys, the Fly is far more high tech and feels superb, others dislike it.. Where as I fell in love with them a long time ago.

But if you'd preffer that version I'd say try before you buy, I've never played that particular model and I was always concerned about tuning issues with that bridge (whether they exist or not).

-Paul
#13
I've heard they are versitile, from the blues to metal.

But, on the downside, they look weird to me.
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#14
aren't p-44 downgrades of the REAL DEAL. The Parker Fly
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