#1
Haha sorry to post another one of these.
But as we know, when I gig, I can't always play with heavy overdrive.
So I have my Traynor YCV50... I want to use its overdrive, but I'm not
sure what the best approach to using it is. Should i set it for the max
gain i want to play with, then switch channels and use a OD pedal?

IF SO, what would be a great OD pedal to use for light OD, without
boosting my mids. (I dont really like my mids higher than like 3)
Guitars
------------------

Epiphone SG w/seymour duncan JB's

Hagstrom Super Swede

Amp
-----------------

Traynor YCV50 BLUE

Pedals
------------------

Line 6 DL-4

Boss TU-2
#2
U dont like ur mids higher than 3? guitars are a mid range instrument,

but just use ur volume nob on ur guitar to control how much gain is travelling through like go down to 7 to diminish a lot of overdrive
#3
Sorry?

But yeah, i could do that...i dont think it would be very effective though.
Guitars
------------------

Epiphone SG w/seymour duncan JB's

Hagstrom Super Swede

Amp
-----------------

Traynor YCV50 BLUE

Pedals
------------------

Line 6 DL-4

Boss TU-2
#4
Quote by BryanChampine
Sorry?

But yeah, i could do that...i dont think it would be very effective though.


You'd be surprised. It takes some time to do though.
Quote by atr5557
i just got the boss mt-2 metal zone pedal today. i got the adapter for it but how do i know if its charging?
#5
I'm probably gonna get alot of Digitech bad monkeyers on this thread.
Guitars
------------------

Epiphone SG w/seymour duncan JB's

Hagstrom Super Swede

Amp
-----------------

Traynor YCV50 BLUE

Pedals
------------------

Line 6 DL-4

Boss TU-2
#6
Quote by BryanChampine
Haha sorry to post another one of these.
But as we know, when I gig, I can't always play with heavy overdrive.
So I have my Traynor YCV50... I want to use its overdrive, but I'm not
sure what the best approach to using it is. Should i set it for the max
gain i want to play with, then switch channels and use a OD pedal?

IF SO, what would be a great OD pedal to use for light OD, without
boosting my mids. (I dont really like my mids higher than like 3)


Mid lower then 3?
How can anyone hear you play?
Is your tone just a mess of treble and bass?

+1 to using volume controls.
MAYBE use different pickups for different gain levels (such as Gibson with two volume pots), or using a lower gain pickup to quieten things for rhythm/clean (like a single coil in a HSH guitar), etc.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#7
Quote by Simsimius
Mid lower then 3?
How can anyone hear you play?
Is your tone just a mess of treble and bass?

+1 to using volume controls.
MAYBE use different pickups for different gain levels (such as Gibson with two volume pots), or using a lower gain pickup to quieten things for rhythm/clean (like a single coil in a HSH guitar), etc.


Mids are NOT necessary for cutting through. Listen to Pantera or Suffocation for examples. Both have basically zero mids. The ear is the most sensitive to the 2-5 kHz sound frequencies, not the mids(500-1.5 kHz), and thus the 2-5kHz range is vital for cutting through, not the mid area.

In fact, listen to pretty much any album with a player that shows the sound spectrum, its universal that the 2-5kHz are the most prominent frequencies in a guitar sound, every decent sound engineer knows that.
#8
Quote by 1337void
Mids are NOT necessary for cutting through. Listen to Pantera or Suffocation for examples. Both have basically zero mids. The ear is the most sensitive to the 2-5 kHz sound frequencies, not the mids(500-1.5 kHz), and thus the 2-5kHz range is vital for cutting through, not the mid area.

In fact, listen to pretty much any album with a player that shows the sound spectrum, its universal that the 2-5kHz are the most prominent frequencies in a guitar sound, every decent sound engineer knows that.


But cutting the mids still isn't a good thing. I don't like the sound, and IMO cutting them does make it difficult to cut through - but not to an extreme.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#9
Quote by Simsimius
But cutting the mids still isn't a good thing. I don't like the sound, and IMO cutting them does make it difficult to cut through - but not to an extreme.

Most people dont like the sound of a Boss HM-2 either, but that didnt stop some legendary swedish death metal bands from using it :P
#10
Quote by 1337void
Most people dont like the sound of a Boss HM-2 either, but that didnt stop some legendary swedish death metal bands from using it :P


lol. You got me there.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#11
Probably will get a lot of Bad Monkey suggestions, agreed - a good solid pedal though, I've got one on my board.

If you've got to gig with just your amp, set it for the loudest, most overdriven tone you're going to possbily need (ie your solo tone), then back off the volume for rhythm parts. Isn't the YCV footswitch a 2-button channel toggle/boost type anyway? That's more than enough variety.
I don't really understand the question though.
#12
Quote by 1337void
Mids are NOT necessary for cutting through. Listen to Pantera or Suffocation for examples. Both have basically zero mids. The ear is the most sensitive to the 2-5 kHz sound frequencies, not the mids(500-1.5 kHz), and thus the 2-5kHz range is vital for cutting through, not the mid area.

In fact, listen to pretty much any album with a player that shows the sound spectrum, its universal that the 2-5kHz are the most prominent frequencies in a guitar sound, every decent sound engineer knows that.



yay finally someone agrees with me, i never thought this day would come, it brings a tear to my eye.
#13
Quote by kyle62
Probably will get a lot of Bad Monkey suggestions, agreed - a good solid pedal though, I've got one on my board.

If you've got to gig with just your amp, set it for the loudest, most overdriven tone you're going to possbily need (ie your solo tone), then back off the volume for rhythm parts. Isn't the YCV footswitch a 2-button channel toggle/boost type anyway? That's more than enough variety.
I don't really understand the question though.


I mic my amp most of the time =p
Guitars
------------------

Epiphone SG w/seymour duncan JB's

Hagstrom Super Swede

Amp
-----------------

Traynor YCV50 BLUE

Pedals
------------------

Line 6 DL-4

Boss TU-2
#14
Quote by 1337void
Mids are NOT necessary for cutting through. Listen to Pantera or Suffocation for examples. Both have basically zero mids. The ear is the most sensitive to the 2-5 kHz sound frequencies, not the mids(500-1.5 kHz), and thus the 2-5kHz range is vital for cutting through, not the mid area.

In fact, listen to pretty much any album with a player that shows the sound spectrum, its universal that the 2-5kHz are the most prominent frequencies in a guitar sound, every decent sound engineer knows that.


for a live gig if u cut the mid the bass tone will over throw the guitar therfore creating a Higher pitch guitar sound that blatantly feels empty thats my opinion
#15
I only cut the mids during practice, but i dont a pedal to boost my mids a bunch.
This has gotten way off topic lol
Guitars
------------------

Epiphone SG w/seymour duncan JB's

Hagstrom Super Swede

Amp
-----------------

Traynor YCV50 BLUE

Pedals
------------------

Line 6 DL-4

Boss TU-2