#1
I didn't want to hijack the other thread

Wiki says:

For other tuplets, the number indicates a ratio to the next lower power of two. So a quintuplet indicated with the numeral 5 means that five of the indicated note value total the duration normally occupied by four, equivalent to the second higher note value; for example, five quintuplet eighth notes total the same duration as a half note. Some numbers are used inconsistently: for example septuplets are sometimes used to mean 7 notes in the duration of 4, but other times to mean 7 notes in the duration of 8. To avoid ambiguity, composers sometimes write the ratio explicitly instead of just a single number

I'm not sure I understand. Following what wiki says, does that mean that 16th note quintuplet would be 5 16th notes in the duration of 4 16th notes, equivalent to a quarter note? What about if there's a ratio? Like a "5:3" over the 16th note quintuplet? Does that mean 5 16th notes played in the duration of 3? So in 4/4, the whole thing would last 3/4 a beat?

What about septuplets? Let's say we have a 16th note septuplet. It that 7 16th notes in the duration of 6, unless there's a ratio?
#2
Yes, except:

Quote by kirbyrocknroll
What about septuplets? Let's say we have a 16th note septuplet. It that 7 16th notes in the duration of 6, unless there's a ratio?
That would be 7 notes in the time of 4, slightly slower than 32nd notes.