#1
How many of you use a capo even if you dont sing?? Just curious. Im not a singer but since my hands are a bit on the small side, the capo is my friend I find it difficult to do Barre Chords with ease, or some chords can be done easier also with the capo. I actually noticed that Social Distortion use a capo when performing. Not only Mike Ness, but also his lead guitarist.
#2
uhhm what? capos arent for singing. i think?

edit: haha i kinda messed that up and read it kinda fast. yea people use capos all the time when there not singing. you need capos to play alot of songs
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Last edited by ldzppln81 at Jul 4, 2008,
#3
I guess his lead guitarist does it so he also can play open chords...
#4
I rarely use it even singing. Unless I'm doing something that absolutely requires I use it because I can't possibly play every chord member I want, I never use one. They bug me.
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#5
Capos are kinda stupid and 95% they're used by guitarists as a crutch because they can't play barre chords. I mean, I'm not one of those guitarists who goes around attacking others, but the only time it's really beneficial to use on is if you're playing a song that requires droning open strings and it's not in E minor or C major or a key like that. Otherwise, playing barre chords helps your finger strength more, as well as helping you piece together what notes are where on the fretboard and how chords are constructed, because rather than just learning shapes, you're learning notes.
#6
i only use it when i want to play open chords, but up a couple steps(i love capoing at the 4th fret)
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#7
Quote by bananaboy
Capos are kinda stupid and 95% they're used by guitarists as a crutch because they can't play barre chords. I mean, I'm not one of those guitarists who goes around attacking others, but the only time it's really beneficial to use on is if you're playing a song that requires droning open strings and it's not in E minor or C major or a key like that. Otherwise, playing barre chords helps your finger strength more, as well as helping you piece together what notes are where on the fretboard and how chords are constructed, because rather than just learning shapes, you're learning notes.


I actually DO know all my Barre Chords, but with my small hands, its kinda hard to hit a clean sounding Barre chord. I guess to each his own
#9
I use a capo alot, my hands are small, so I use it for continuous barre chords, also many songs either require them or are very easy with them(Hotel California).......But the only problem is that the good ones are around $20-$30.......
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#10
I use em, mostly b/c transcribing open chords up a couple steps in my head, then playing em well to a song is a bit difficult for me right now. So yea, i guess i do use it as a crutch sometimes, but i dont like to make things too hard for myself.
#11
I use a capo when I play in open tunings, which means slide stuff. Great for quick key changes
#12
Quote by bananaboy
Capos are kinda stupid and 95% they're used by guitarists as a crutch because they can't play barre chords. I mean, I'm not one of those guitarists who goes around attacking others, but the only time it's really beneficial to use on is if you're playing a song that requires droning open strings and it's not in E minor or C major or a key like that. Otherwise, playing barre chords helps your finger strength more, as well as helping you piece together what notes are where on the fretboard and how chords are constructed, because rather than just learning shapes, you're learning notes.


What you fail to realise is that you don't get the same sound playing barre chords as you do with open chords, so that's one reason for a capo, also some chords you really can't play barred. Oh and I've seen a lot of flamenco players, who tend to be very talented, use capos, and it's not because the use drones or can't play barre chords.
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#13
Quote by bananaboy
Capos are kinda stupid and 95% they're used by guitarists as a crutch because they can't play barre chords. I mean, I'm not one of those guitarists who goes around attacking others, but the only time it's really beneficial to use on is if you're playing a song that requires droning open strings and it's not in E minor or C major or a key like that. Otherwise, playing barre chords helps your finger strength more, as well as helping you piece together what notes are where on the fretboard and how chords are constructed, because rather than just learning shapes, you're learning notes.


Capo-ing is making the guitar smaller, in turn altering the timbre. It sounds better with a capo than just barring... Especially on acoustic guitars.

Edit: Go play a C open then a C barré chord and tell me they sound the same.
#14
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
What you fail to realise is that you don't get the same sound playing barre chords as you do with open chords, so that's one reason for a capo, also some chords you really can't play barred. Oh and I've seen a lot of flamenco players, who tend to be very talented, use capos, and it's not because the use drones or can't play barre chords.


agreed man. He just needed to boost his e-thugness
#15
Quote by bananaboy
Capos are kinda stupid and 95% they're used by guitarists as a crutch because they can't play barre chords. I mean, I'm not one of those guitarists who goes around attacking others, but the only time it's really beneficial to use on is if you're playing a song that requires droning open strings and it's not in E minor or C major or a key like that. Otherwise, playing barre chords helps your finger strength more, as well as helping you piece together what notes are where on the fretboard and how chords are constructed, because rather than just learning shapes, you're learning notes.


uhhh no.
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#16
Yeah, certain chord progressions just seem to sparkle more higher up on the neck, as do different chord shapes. It's the same reason people tune to drop D. It just gives it a different vibe. Also, a TON of acoustic Beatles songs use them. And they're one of the greatest bands of all time.
Last edited by pensiveintensiv at Jul 4, 2008,
#17
i agree, capos arent just for smaller fingers or whatever they just give songs a different tone. i play social distortion and mik eness songs alot and without the capo on some songs it just doesn't sound right, especially when u try and sing to it, it's in i different key
Last edited by swk138 at Aug 26, 2008,
#18
Capos are very useful when singing, and also let you play some otherwise impossible chords.
#20
Capos have a variety of uses. Primarily you can use them to shift the key of a song, this can be useful when playing with a singer who doesn't want to sing a song in the original key, but you've written some cool guitar parts. Here's some vids of me using a capo in action. In both vids the guitar parts would not be possible in that key without a capo.

A Cover of Mad World - Gary Jules (Capo 7th Fret)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJ2krty-dew

Time (Original Song - Capo 5th Fret) (Vid Quality isn't as good, but you get the idea)
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=cMCEoPYG1dQ
Last edited by AlanHB at Sep 2, 2008,
#21
When playing a chord melody hybrid part, it's sometimes impossible to use barre chords and hit the melody notes (say Here Comes the Sun or Norwegian Wood). In these cases a capo is pretty much a necessity.
#22
I've been using my capo recently learning Rylynn by Andy mckee, its oly on 4 string at the 4th fret.....

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#24
Try playing a g chord shape up a few steps without a capo and tell me you don't need them lol
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#25
sorry, i'm new at this, and i just need some clarification...
a capo then, is for changing the tune of the open chords, or help playing barre chords? So it would be possible to play a song that requires a capo without one, right? i realize that some chords are ridiculous, and this is an advantage in that case..
Ok i'm gonna go ahead and say i wanted to learn the arpeggio thing in the song ode to my family, and every tab i find says it needs a capo, and most youtube videos that i have found (which play the arpeggio thing i want to learn, not the chords) have the capo. and well, part of me wants to run out and buy one right now, but part of me would like to see if i can learn without it...or am i outta my element here?

thanks for any help or advice or whatnot in advance.


edit: while looking at the tab again, i see the chords are

C Am Em F C

these can be played without a capo, but it says capo on 2nd fret at the top....