#1
i have a problem with setting eq for guitar. im using a line 6 gx toneport. for our songs, we have one guitar playing lead octaves, and the other playing power chords. we both pan them to opposite sides at 70percent at same volume. but i wanna make the lead octaves louder as i can barely hear them, it doesnt stand out. but at the same time, i want the two guitars to be panned. im also afraid that if i increase too much of its volume, it wont be balanced when listening the track. should i change both tracks' eqs, or just the lead?

another question, is it a necessity to decrease the low ends of the guitars' eq? i've been many times that if i dont cut the low end of the eq for guitar, i wont be able to hear the bass clearly, which is quite true in my case. but im not fond of the tone now, it sounds too empty and dry. is there anyway i can change this?
#2
First, for the panning: Just either turn up that channel's individual volume or center a little more. A 70% pan is getting to the overkill point. Around 40-50% is just fine. That will also help with the problem of it being unbalanced.

For your EQ problem: Not that lowering your lows is a neccessity, but if they're completely cranked, then it can pose some problems, lower them a bit, but not to the point that it will sound weak. Just turn up the bass, but turn down any gain on it as not to overload your speakers.

Hope that all helped you.
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#3
Re-record both guitar tracks, and make sure the tone of the octave guitar is different to the tone of the rhythm guitar, if possible use two different amps. Even when you pan to an extreme extent like 70%, if you have two guitars at similar registers that sound almost identical the entire mix can sound really cluttered, and almost like theres just one really loud and thick guitar playing really messily. Also put a little reverb on both of them, but set the decay times differently, that'll also help in creating two distinctive guitar tones.

As far as EQ, if you don't EQ properly theres going to be alot of frequencies floating around in the mix that are so low that they are barely audible, this is a terrible thing to have in your mix. Use enough bass so that you can get a full tone, but no more than that. Good luck with it.
#4
i also have another problem. when i play palm muted chords, the frequency on the recording shows that it goes higher than the rest of the stuff i play. and it sounds too loud and fuzzy. is there anyway i can reduce this?
#5
You're probably clipping the input stage with palm-mutes. To avoid so, either turn down your input gain, or if you have one, use a compressor to tame the low resonance of the palm mutes.

That is, if I am correct in assuming that by 'frequency' you mean waveform amplitude.
#6
Quote by MrPillow
You're probably clipping the input stage with palm-mutes. To avoid so, either turn down your input gain, or if you have one, use a compressor to tame the low resonance of the palm mutes.

That is, if I am correct in assuming that by 'frequency' you mean waveform amplitude.


how do i work the condenser?
do i turn down the threshold or the gain?
#7
Yeah the toneport has a compressor, but it has a really slow and uneven release, so you still get these uncontrollable lapses in volume, but it'll definatly sound better than the clipping. Also it sounds like you're levels are way too hot, try setting the volume on the mixer or interface or input volume of the sequencer to atleast -10, and then turn the volume up at the speaker/output volume if you can't hear it (to all the experienced guys, don't go crazy i'm just trying to simplify it for him.) This won't change the uneven volume but it will prevent the clipping. Recording with levels that are too hot is the most common mistake made in recording, I record at -18.

Edit: haha its a compressor, a condenser is a type of microphone. Read this article before you ask any more questions, it should answer everything, and its in really simple terms too.

ftp://ftp.dbxpro.com/pub/PDFs/WhitePapers/Compression%20101.pdf
Last edited by f*ck 0ff at Jul 4, 2008,