#1
To a lot of you players this will be like watching a caveman discover
how to use a stick as a tool..lol...but anyways..

Today I was playing around just noodling..

I was playing a lil riff....A#5 to C5

a little while later i decided to play C5 to C7(#9)

To my surprise..it amost sounded like i went from a C5 to a temporary OD.

So then i decided to go back to A#5 to C5 and occasionally
substitute C7(#9) for C5

Can any of you guys explain how chord7(#9) relates to chord5 and why they work?

Also..Why do all 5's seem to work better in a linear chromatic riff than 7/9's
(If thats just me...its ok..let me know how u think they sound)

is ?5 just a fraction of ?7(#9)..or is just the same root that makes it work?
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett
Last edited by Washburnd Fretz at Jul 4, 2008,
#2
First off.. I don't know what you mean by "temporary OD".. but I think I can explain how _5s and _7(#9)s work together.

A _5 "chord" is just a power chord, which consists of the 1 and 5 of a certain key. (E B, or C G, etc.) The _7(#9) chord includes the 1 and 5 (usually), in addition to other degrees (the 3, b7, and #9). I don't really know what you're asking about how they work or why you're bringing fractions into this.. but I hope that helped.
Nor less I deem that there are Powers
Which of themselves our minds impress;
That we can feed this mind of ours
In a wise passiveness.
--Wordsworth

last.fm
#3
Quote by Thursdae
The _7(#9) chord includes the 1 and 5 (usually)

That right there explains alot. I think thats it.

I was playin with distortion and when the C7#9 comes after C5 it sounds kinda like somebody turned on the Overdrive. Im gonna use it for some gradient tones...thanx
I bet Charlie Brown's teacher's name was Mrs.Hammett
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
The standard, Hendrix voicing does not contain the fifth.


True...


The difference between 5 cord and 7(#9) cord is that the second one has extra tones added to it, just like Thursdae said...
Now, the thing is that over 5 cords you can play almost anything, but adding the extra notes narrows your note selection, but adds color to the final product...
#8
Hendrix liked this chord because he said it was the essence of blues in a single chord (or something to that effect). The #9 is the minor third an octave higher. Combined with the major 3rd and the 7th, it pretty much is.
#9
Quote by xtapol
Hendrix liked this chord because he said it was the essence of blues in a single chord (or something to that effect). The #9 is the minor third an octave higher. Combined with the major 3rd and the 7th, it pretty much is.


Nicely said... Blues actually is a dorian/mixolydian combination... So Jimi was 100% correct...
#10
Quote by Rax13
Nicely said... Blues actually is a dorian/mixolydian combination... So Jimi was 100% correct...

I never thought of blues as dorian/mixolydian. At some point in 12-bar blues, almost every tone can makes sense in a harmonic context.
#11
Quote by werty22
At some point in 12-bar blues, almost every tone can makes sense in a harmonic context.
I made a post about how each note fits over each chord a few months ago.


However, thinking of the blues as a hybrid of the dorian and mixolydian scales is fairly accurate. That hybrid scale would contain the most common notes used in a blues song.
#12
Quote by werty22
I never thought of blues as dorian/mixolydian. At some point in 12-bar blues, almost every tone can makes sense in a harmonic context.


Using "passing tones" is one thing... When I said dorian/mixolydian it referred to the structure of the blues...