#1
I am wiring my cab together. Do i need to heat the wire, or the metal on the speaker? Seems like the wire would have to get pretty darn hot before it starts melting
#2
Wrong froum

anyways, wtf, are you trying to melt the wire instead of using solder?
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#3
Quote by patriotplayer90
I am wiring my cab together. Do i need to heat the wire, or the metal on the speaker? Seems like the wire would have to get pretty darn hot before it starts melting

imanoobatsoldering.

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Last edited by chase312 at Jul 6, 2008,
#4
Are you trying to weld it? lol
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#6
Quote by chase312
You don't melt the wire

You have to get solder, which melts on contact with the iron.
You hold the iron just a fraction of an inch above the connection, and touch the solder to the iron and just keep pushing into the iron. It will feel like you're going straight through the air because it melts instantly. A little drop of melted solder should run down the iron on to the connection, and there it will cool and harden quickly.


I don't mean to offend, but this absolutely NOT the right way to solder. You don't use solder like hot glue. If it doesn't form a molecular bond with the surface of the metals you're trying to join then the solder joint will be cold, and will eventually fail.

The only way to get solder to properly bond with the metals you're joining is to get those metals hot enough so that they can melt the solder themselves. You put the clean and tinned tip of the soldering iron at the point where the two metals meet and let the metals get hot. You touch the solder wire to the OPPOSITE side of the joint. This let's the flux core melt and flow into the joint, cleaning away the surface oxides and forming a barrier against further oxide formations. A fraction of a second later, the solder should melt and flow into the joint, displacing the flux and bonding with the metals.

It takes practice to get this right, but you're more likely to get it right if you understand how solder is supposed to work.
#7
Addendum to amp_sugeon...

Strip about 1/4 of the insulation off the wire. Tin it. This is done by putting a tiny bit of solder on the iron, then touching the iron to the underside of the wire (the solder here helps to speed up the heating up of the wire). Put the solder on top of the wire, it will start to melt. Then move the solder, and the iron towards the insulation. You should end up with a very thin layer of solder. You should still be able to see the strands of the wire.

Also a good idea to melt a tiny bit of new solder on the speaker connection (removes any corrosion from old solder among other things).
Now stick your iron on the underside of the speaker connection and when the solder melts, stick the wire in there.
Done properly, the solder on the wire and the speaker connection should blend. Remove the iron and hold the wire until it cools. Don't allow it to move or you could end up with a bad solder joint. Sometimes its helpful to hold the wire LIGHTLY with something, Tweezers work good here. Or hold onto the wire a good 6 inchs or so away from where its being soldered (it get really hot).
Last edited by CodeMonk at Jul 5, 2008,
#8
Quote by chase312
You don't melt the wire

You have to get solder, which melts on contact with the iron.
You hold the iron just a fraction of an inch above the connection, and touch the solder to the iron and just keep pushing into the iron. It will feel like you're going straight through the air because it melts instantly. A little drop of melted solder should run down the iron on to the connection, and there it will cool and harden quickly.



you lose.

J/K, yes, you heat the materials you are going to to solder, which in turn melts the solder. If you just drop it onto the metals you try to solder, you get a cold solder joint, and it's cloudy looking, not shiny and clean.

TS, sounds like you aren't using solder though...
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#10
Quote by patriotplayer90
I was not using solder! You can obviously tell I have 0 experience



don't worry, i did the same exact thing! Lol.

It's super easy, though. Don't worry. I would explain it to you, but just about everyone on this thread is 100% correct.
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#12
Quote by patriotplayer90
How do you desolder something then?

Just put the soldering iron up to the solder joint and it'll just melt, and you pull the wires/whatever it's connected to apart.

Do you get what i'm saying?
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#13
^ I just touch the iron to the joint, then the solder comes loose and balls up.

EDIT: beaten to it
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#15
Quote by chase312
You don't melt the wire

You have to get solder, which melts on contact with the iron.
You hold the iron just a fraction of an inch above the connection, and touch the solder to the iron and just keep pushing into the iron. It will feel like you're going straight through the air because it melts instantly. A little drop of melted solder should run down the iron on to the connection, and there it will cool and harden quickly.

just for future reference, here's a video that showed me the ways of the iron.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_NU2ruzyc4
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#17
wind the wire round the speaker terminal, creating a firm connection WITHOUT SOLDER, then hold the iron against it to get it heated up, then push solder against it, it should melt, then take it off immediately, and it should have flowed correctly, don't listen to the guy who said you should let it fall through the air
lol@u
#18
Dude you've just shown that you should someone else to do it. DONT melt the wire and Especially DONT HEAT THE SPEAKER
#19
^just because he didn't know, doesnt meant he can't learn.

if there was damage done, then it was already done. he's better off, reading the tutorials, and buying a $15 soldering iron kit now, imo.

instructions are on the pack. while he's getting it, he can buy the quick connect clips too.
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#20
Quote by amp_surgeon
I don't mean to offend, but this absolutely NOT the right way to solder. You don't use solder like hot glue. If it doesn't form a molecular bond with the surface of the metals you're trying to join then the solder joint will be cold, and will eventually fail.

The only way to get solder to properly bond with the metals you're joining is to get those metals hot enough so that they can melt the solder themselves. You put the clean and tinned tip of the soldering iron at the point where the two metals meet and let the metals get hot. You touch the solder wire to the OPPOSITE side of the joint. This let's the flux core melt and flow into the joint, cleaning away the surface oxides and forming a barrier against further oxide formations. A fraction of a second later, the solder should melt and flow into the joint, displacing the flux and bonding with the metals.

It takes practice to get this right, but you're more likely to get it right if you understand how solder is supposed to work.

Not trying to argue at all,
I'm always afraid that if I do it the way you said that I'd ruin whatever I'm soldering...
Example, if I'm soldering a lead to a pot, I thought that if I touch the iron to where I'm soldering it, it would heat up the whole thing and ruin it.

We're all noobs at some point in our lives, right?

:]

I'll youtube it and learn the right way.
EDIT: thank you unsignedrecords!
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#21
Quote by chase312
Not trying to argue at all,
I'm always afraid that if I do it the way you said that I'd ruin whatever I'm soldering...
Example, if I'm soldering a lead to a pot, I thought that if I touch the iron to where I'm soldering it, it would heat up the whole thing and ruin it.

We're all noobs at some point in our lives, right?

:]

I'll youtube it and learn the right way.
EDIT: thank you unsignedrecords!


Actually, with proper technique, and practice, you'll melt the solder before you fry the component. With more sensitive components (not pots) you can use a heatsink clip.
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#22
Quote by Reincaster
Actually, with proper technique, and practice, you'll melt the solder before you fry the component. With more sensitive components (not pots) you can use a heatsink clip.

I watched 5 or 6 videos on it, so I think I have a better understanding now.

Thank you for the info though

To the TS:
Everyone here obviously knows more than me about soldering
listen to them :]
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#23
Quote by guy_tebache
Dude you've just shown that you should someone else to do it. DONT melt the wire and Especially DONT HEAT THE SPEAKER


I didn't heat the speaker, and it still works, I have tested it since, thank goodness!

So you are saying wrap the wire around the speaker slide-on terminal, and put solder over that to keep it in place?

Also is there designated positive/negative cables?