#1
Hi,
I recently starting playing again after several years away.
I'm 38 now and find I have a touch of RSI and reumatic pain when I play lead guitar.
This slows me down and stops me hitting full shred.
Last night I use a herbal muscle balm on my fretting hand to try and control the pain, then I did stretches and played warm up exercises for about 2 hours.
The result were awesome, I had very little pain and was able to play much faster and clearer.
I recorded my shedding to my sound blaster card using "what you hear", it turned out well.
Listen to the uploaded recording to see what I mean, I can't play even 75% this well these days, so this very proves the benefit of warming up, stretching and looking after your hands. Maybe I will still be able to shred when I'm 60.
Download recording of warm up Riffing after warm up example mp3 (right click, save target) don't bother listening to the whole seven minutes, a couple of minutes shows what I mean

Any feedback from other members on this topic (best ways to warm up) or any guitar, tone or recording discussion would be welcome.

A Martinengo, Auckland, NZ. Gibson Les Paul Classic, V-Amp, Mis-Spent Youth.
#2
Yea stretching makes a huge difference even short term. A bit ago I hadnt been playing for a few weeks. So I picked up the guitar one morning and I was extremely slow and inaccurate. Not necissarily at shredding or something with fast picking but at just general solos, something like comfortably numb. Either from the morning or the week of not playing, just doing some streches bodily to get the blood flowing and finger to get some flexibility, with a bit of warm up riffs allowed me to regain it all back. I was scared for a good bit doubting myself "Whoah I thought I was better than this! What happend?" hahah
#4
Quote by Avedas
I believe this is the right video.

http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=CrAaMLpP20k

John Petrucci's Rock Discipline video has some great warm-up stretches and exercises.
OMG thats hilarious.

I lol'd so hard when he put away his guitar after saying "now we're gonna do some exercises that dont involve the guitar."

Other key quotes "oooh, my arm just cracked *continues to smile like a jerk* your might too."

He's a legend at guitar, and that video is awesome, but who can resist laughing?
#5
I havn't watched the Paul Gilbert video, but I know what you mean about funny.
It takes alot of hard work to reach those dizzing heights of playing.
I think that is why in the early nineties people became fed up with technical playing and went into grunge etc.
Does fast technical playing really sound better anyway? It sounds cool but often one fast sredder can sound very similar to the next one.
Dave Gilmor is proof that you don't have to play fast to sound good.
But then you listen to late Judas Priest, they sound great shredding or playing slow expresive licks, so If I have the time to warm up I'll put in the speed practice but not neglect working on my phrasing by playing old Jimmy Page solo's etc.
I still think Iron Man is the most fun song to play ever, even though it is fairly easy.
#6
Quote by demonofthenight
He's a legend at guitar, and that video is awesome, but who can resist laughing?


Not even himself. I read in the interview that he was laughing so hard when he saw the overdub versions.

Quote by aquila_rose
I havn't watched the Paul Gilbert video, but I know what you mean about funny.
It takes alot of hard work to reach those dizzing heights of playing.
I think that is why in the early nineties people became fed up with technical playing and went into grunge etc.
Does fast technical playing really sound better anyway? It sounds cool but often one fast sredder can sound very similar to the next one.
Dave Gilmor is proof that you don't have to play fast to sound good.
But then you listen to late Judas Priest, they sound great shredding or playing slow expresive licks, so If I have the time to warm up I'll put in the speed practice but not neglect working on my phrasing by playing old Jimmy Page solo's etc.
I still think Iron Man is the most fun song to play ever, even though it is fairly easy.


What sounds better is really a matter of opinion. I think where shredders - not really the professional ones - can get overboard is where they sometimes do it too much, because they can. There's a video where Paul Gilbert and this youtube guitarist, which is a great example. Paul, being the amazing player he is, shreds, but also plays more... 'melodic.' While the youtube guitarist just shreds away, going at high speeds. To me, sometimes it seems like people want to prove themselves by playing fast. Many of the times, they don't have to. I know I've wanted to prove myself by playing fast in past. I'm not dissing speed in any way, I am working hard at trying to get faster and have more control over my instrument too. That goes for 'emotional' players as well. I don't prefer it when a solo is one note is held for 16 bars (unless they play around with effects and feedback), and then the guitarist saying that he played with soul. So really, everything in moderation.
DANNY

Quote by kevinm4435 to some guy
hey d00d i herd u dont like shred u r a genius 4 thinkin dat. all shred is fukin lame wit no soul u no wat im sayin??
Last edited by bluesrocker101 at Jul 11, 2008,