#1
i was just looking at variouse amps on assorted company site (marshall, mesa all that good stuff) and i was looking at the Marshall JH100 (jimi hendrix head) and the 1959RR 100 plexi heads, and i was wondering, how did jimi and randy get distortion/overdrive on there amps, i didnt see and switch or anything, is there any stock overdrive/ distortion on them?
#2
Old tube amps had no preamp volume, only a single volume. To get overdrive they cranked them to get natural tube clipping. Because of their size this meant astonishing volume.
#3
Quote by laxdude123
i was just looking at variouse amps on assorted company site (marshall, mesa all that good stuff) and i was looking at the Marshall JH100 (jimi hendrix head) and the 1959RR 100 plexi heads, and i was wondering, how did jimi and randy get distortion/overdrive on there amps, i didnt see and switch or anything, is there any stock overdrive/ distortion on them?

Volume knob, simple as.
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#5
the louder you turned em up the more they began to growl...
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#6
These amps would be cranked revealing natural tube breakup distortion as others have already posted. In order to clean up the sound, the guitar player would turn down volume on the guitar. So basically, the guitar volume pots were used much more than today to increase/decrease dirt. Nowadays, I have seen players, with channel switching ability, rarely even use the guitar volume, except to go completely off/on.
#7
Yeah. The guitar's volume is a great thing to have when you've got the natural breakup going on. I don't use an overdrive when I'm playing a tube amp, cos I can just raise my volume knob a bit to boost it for a solo.