#1
Is it necassary to memorize where all the notes are on the guitar fretboard. If so what techniques did you use or are trying to use to memorize the notes. And what could you do if you knew where the notes where.
Im a guitar noob so im just wondering if its something im going to have to do.
#2
I think it's pretty important to know this... I would start by learning all the open string notes (EADGBE) and then going from there. Learn which notes don't have sharps/fats between them (EF, BC) and go up the fret, string by string, naming out all the notes and their sharps/flats. Some techniques include labeling the frets with their notes or writing them out on a piece of paper. Also learn octaves on the guitar to find the same note in a different place faster.
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#3
i'd say it's a pretty good thing to kno. the way i used to remember the open strings would be to say it phonetically so EADGBE would be 'eed-gbee' <---genius...i kno
but yea, spend just a couple minutes a day learning the notes on the board and your good to go.
#4
It's not strictly necessary, but it's really useful to be able to look at a certain fret and be able to tell which note and octave it's in. You should definitely try to gain at least a basic understanding of where all notes are.
#5
i think its more important u learn scale shapes and intervals, but learn the notes too so u can figure where the scales are lol.
#6
It's EXTREMELY important to know all of the notes all over the fretboard. Something that is infinitely helpful is to call out the note names while practicing scales. Practice these scales in shapes that cover the entire fretboard; that way, when it comes to improvising a solo, you'll instinctively know all the notes in that scale across the board, making it much easier to improvise.
#7
I think this is one of the most important aspects of playing guitar. It opens up so many doors, and which combined with memorizing scales, makes playing music endlessly fun. The way I went about it was, I memorized the open strings. Then I memorized all the natural notes (no sharps or flats) up to the fifth fret, one string at a time. Then i learned between the fifth fret and the twelfth.

A good strategy is to learn notes three at a time, just helps the brain comprehend. If you have some money, buy a watch, and set the timer to ring every half hour or so. Every time it rings, picture the neck in your head and say the three notes and where they are that you are currently working on. Spend a couple days one three notes, and review ones you've already done.

It's annoying beyond all belief, but like I said, it's crucial to playing.

Keep it funky.
#8
Quote by JeffWiredBeck24
It's EXTREMELY important to know all of the notes all over the fretboard. Something that is infinitely helpful is to call out the note names while practicing scales. Practice these scales in shapes that cover the entire fretboard; that way, when it comes to improvising a solo, you'll instinctively know all the notes in that scale across the board, making it much easier to improvise.

Yes, this works well. Another thing is to learn horizontally; a lot of guitarists get locked into patterns going up and down the neck, so work on one string at a time. Learn the notes of the high E string, and then practicing soloing in all keys while doing this. Once you feel comfortable, repeat for the other 5 strings. You can sing as you go along to train your ear to hear the intervals as well.
#10
i just made flash cards with a string and fret number on one side and the note name on the other like side 1 is A-2 and the other side says B. I did it like that and then once you know them pretty well run through them and go to the fret on the guitar and name it from that rather than from the card or else you will just know that A-2 = B and not necessarily know by looking at the second fret on the A string is a B.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#11
Set a timer for five minutes and click this link Fretboard Trainer
Do all 12 frets and see how many you can do in the five minutes. Write the percentage and how many you got inside the five minutes.

Then for the rest of the week get some blank fretboards (I have a attached one for you if you want it). Print it out maybe five times on an A4 page and fill out the notes.
Start with one note and after you've drawn it in every place it occurs play the notes on your guitar. Say the note as you play it (Better yet sing the note as you play it) and say where they are eg C - b string 1st fret. C - a string third fret. etc. etc.

Also use the link above for a few minutes a day. You may want to chop back to the first five frets in the first week and add notes as you get better.

Mix in the other suggestions as well the more ways you drill yourselves and the more often you do it the less bored you'll get and the quicker you'll learn it. I like the watch one or even without the watch if you are waiting for a bus or at the dentists, picture the fretboard in your mind and work your way up a string saying each note, string, and fret as you go. Or if you have a pen and paper draw some frets and name some notes across the strings

At the end of the week use the link again and crank it up to the full 12 frets. Set a timer for five minutes and see if you can not only improve the percentage correct but see if you can answer more questions in the five minutes period.

This way you can see yourself improve and get better each week and you have a mark to beat and work towards.

Good Luck
Attachments:
Fretboard 15.jpg.zip
Si
#12
Quote by solrac94
Is it necassary to memorize where all the notes are on the guitar fretboard. If so what techniques did you use or are trying to use to memorize the notes. And what could you do if you knew where the notes where.
Im a guitar noob so im just wondering if its something im going to have to do.
I dont think it is.

Think about it. 21 frets on a guitar * 6 strings = 126 places to put your fingers, and this is over 4 octaves (48 notes). Than theres 6 different places to play the same note. You'd have to be pretty tenacious to remember all those notes cold.

The thing I like about guitar is that we can use shapes, patterns and visual cues on the guitar. We can play and think in intervals and scale degrees (which is very helpfull for sight reading/improvising) instead of notes and than intervals and scale degrees, like most other instruments. It's for these reason, I think, that guitar is so popular, its a damn easy instrument.
#13
Quote by demonofthenight
its a damn easy instrument.

Easy to learn - difficult to master.
Si
#14
I don't think its the most important thing, but it is good to know. One thing to remember is that the fretboard repeats itself up the neck. 1st breakdown is the 12th fret, exactly the same as the lower frets. Another breakdown 5-9 frets is like the open-4 frets transposed down one string, i.e. low e- 5-9th fret notes are a,a#,b,c,c#; same as a string open-4th fret. Its a little weird at the b string notes, but its a way to help to memorize the fretboard.
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#15
Quote by edg
Knowing the fretboard note names is helpful, but in terms of improvisation not
knowing them, or knowing just some of them, is not a showstopper. IMO.
I'd put other stuff at a higher priority. If you have to read music, it's a lot more
important.
When improvising, most guitarist will be thinking in intervals and degrees, not in notes. It's the intervals that define how you sound, not the notes. Lets face it, a B carries no more feeling than an A.

Also, I dont think in notes when I'm reading music. I also think in scale degrees and intervals when I'm reading. Not sure about anyone else.

Anyway, knowing the fretboard is important. But theres other methods which will enable you to do the same things, except without actually going through the tedious task of learning the fretboard.
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#16
^ I agree with you, a lot of people sound recognizable because of certain intervals and the rhythym they play them in. As an example I was watching the blues channel on music choice one night half paying attention and a guitar riff got my attention. It was a guy I know who my dad played with in the '60's. He has a distinctive string skip thing that I can recognize a mile a way.

I wont say I consiously memorized the fretboard, as I don't think notes when i'm improvising, but I know where to play to get the sound I want. I know the fretboard well, but I also break it down a lot to 'call out' notes.

I tried the Fretboard trainer posted earlier in this tread and think its a really good product.
Gibson ES335
Ibanez RG370DXGP
Ibanez SA Series
Fender Acoustic
Marshall JCM800 1-12 split channel
#17
Somehow I get the impression people want to go through spending a lot of time
memorizing fretboard note names because they think it will unlock some mysterious
ability to improvise -- as though someone who can improvise well has note names
streaming through thier head while playing. I just don't think it works that way and
I know for sure I don't improvise that way at all. It can be extremely helpful knowing
them for sure, but the benefits work in hand with other skills. Visualizing
scale degrees and intervals and relationships with harmony are far more important.

Probably about the best way to learn the notes on the fretboard is just read some
music. Kills 2 birds with 1 stone...
#18
Quote by edg
Probably about the best way to learn the notes on the fretboard is just read some
music. Kills 2 birds with 1 stone...
But I read music with scale degrees and intervals?

How would I go about learning the fretboard?
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[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
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        L.