#1
-Well, the intervals that make up the scales are one difference.
Here are each modes formula's in relation to their major scales.

Ionian: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Dorian: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
Phrygian: 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian: 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7
Mixolydian: 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
Aeolian: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Locrian: 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7

can someone explain this please?

I understand that Ionian is the major scale

if you're playing in the key of Gmajor

gmajor scale is - G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G (i think)?

if you play it in the "dorian mode"

what would it be (please explain)
#2
i'm assuming you copy-pasted that from the theory FAQ.
well, all i have to say is that you should keep on reading that thread, for there is more on modes in the third post in that thread.
#3
Quote by RCalisto
i'm assuming you copy-pasted that from the theory FAQ.
well, all i have to say is that you should keep on reading that thread, for there is more on modes in the third post in that thread.


thanks, but i'd find it much easier if someone could just finish off my example
#4
many times, though, being the easy way doesn't exactly mean that's the best way. i think you should try to figure it out yourself, as i'm sure you'd gain much more from that. being told about something and actually experiencing it is quite different in therms of how good you'll remember it.
#5
Quote by Swap-Meet
thanks, but i'd find it much easier if someone could just finish off my example

Much easier is also much less beneficial to you. You're not clear on how modes work yet, so go back and read up some more.
#6
G ionian is the G major scale G A B C D E F#
The notes correspond to the intervals 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

G dorian has the intervals 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
So you flatten (lower by one semitone) the 3 and 7 of the G major scale and you find that:
G dorian is G A Bb C D E F
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#7
Quote by Swap-Meet
-Well, the intervals that make up the scales are one difference.
Here are each modes formula's in relation to their major scales.

Ionian: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Dorian: 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
Phrygian: 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian: 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7
Mixolydian: 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
Aeolian: 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Locrian: 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7

can someone explain this please?

I understand that Ionian is the major scale

if you're playing in the key of Gmajor

gmajor scale is - G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G (i think)?

if you play it in the "dorian mode"

what would it be (please explain)


The formulas you quoted above are all relative to the major scale. That is, they are the notes of the different modes in comparison to the notes of the major scale.

If you look at the formula for Ionian, the major scale, the formula is 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7. All the other formulas below it are relative to this.

You are correct in calling the G major scale G - A - B - C - D - E - F#. The G Dorian mode would be G - A - Bb - C - D - E - F.


G Ionian | 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 |  G - A - B - C - D - E - F#
G Dorian | 1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - b7 | G - A - Bb - C - D - E - F

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7
G - A - B - C - D - E - F#
-----------------------------
1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - b7
G - A - Bb - C - D - E - F

Can you see above, by comparing the notes of G major to the Dorian formula, how I arrived at the conclusion that G Dorian consists of those notes?

Using the Dorian formula.. 

1 - G - This is the same as the G major scale.
2 - A - As above.
b3 - Bb - The G major scale contains a 3, Dorian a b3. So we take the '3' of G major, B,  and flatten it. 
4 - C - As 1 and 2.
5 - D- As above.
6 - E - And again.
b7 - F - The G major scale contains a 7, Dorian a b7. So we take the '7' of G major, F#, and flatten it.


And so, using the Dorian scale formula and comparing it to the notes and formula of the major scale, we end up with the G Dorian mode.

Does this explain to you how to interpret the scale formulas? Remember, all scale formulas are relative to the major scale, 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7.

If you think you understand this, write out the other 5 modes (Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian) in your next post to confirm.
#8
Quote by Ænimus Prime
G ionian is the G major scale G A B C D E F#
The notes correspond to the intervals 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

G dorian has the intervals 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
So you flatten (lower by one semitone) the 3 and 7 of the G major scale and you find that:
G dorian is G A Bb C D E F


thank you very much, I was thinking that's how it worked, but wasn't 100% positive.

To all the other people that said I should figure it out on my own, I understand that you think it's more helpful to me if I find it out myself, but I'm able to understand things if I have the answer and then look at what things had to change in order to get that answer (i didn't have to do it here cause he explained it).
#9
Quote by Swap-Meet
thank you very much, I was thinking that's how it worked, but wasn't 100% positive.

To all the other people that said I should figure it out on my own, I understand that you think it's more helpful to me if I find it out myself, but I'm able to understand things if I have the answer and then look at what things had to change in order to get that answer (i didn't have to do it here cause he explained it).

But keep in mind that with modes, the harmony determines the modality. Even if you play the notes of G Dorian, you're not playing the G Dorian mode unless the harmony suggests it.
#10
Quote by :-D
But keep in mind that with modes, the harmony determines the modality. Even if you play the notes of G Dorian, you're not playing the G Dorian mode unless the harmony suggests it.


No idea what you mean.

alot of times I don't usually use theory when writing a solo, I just go by whatever I think sounds best, but since when do people use theory to write punk rock? xD

This is just for my own personal interest, doubt I'll use it very much, I usually just stick to Major and petatonic minor / blues petatonic minor.... I don't really like the other scales too much
#11
Quote by Swap-Meet
No idea what you mean.

Which is why I suggested you learn this material rather than having the information fed to you; even if you know the notes of the modal scales, they mean nothing if you don't understand the application.
#12
Quote by Johnljones7443
The formulas you quoted above are all relative to the major scale. That is, they are the notes of the different modes in comparison to the notes of the major scale.

If you look at the formula for Ionian, the major scale, the formula is 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7. All the other formulas below it are relative to this.

You are correct in calling the G major scale G - A - B - C - D - E - F#. The G Dorian mode would be G - A - Bb - C - D - E - F.


G Ionian | 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7 | G - A - B - C - D - E - F#
G Dorian | 1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - b7 | G - A - Bb - C - D - E - F

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7
G - A - B - C - D - E - F#
-----------------------------
1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - b7
G - A - Bb - C - D - E - F

Can you see above, by comparing the notes of G major to the Dorian formula, how I arrived at the conclusion that G Dorian consists of those notes?

Using the Dorian formula..

1 - G - This is the same as the G major scale.
2 - A - As above.
b3 - Bb - The G major scale contains a 3, Dorian a b3. So we take the '3' of G major, B, and flatten it.
4 - C - As 1 and 2.
5 - D- As above.
6 - E - And again.
b7 - F - The G major scale contains a 7, Dorian a b7. So we take the '7' of G major, F#, and flatten it.


And so, using the Dorian scale formula and comparing it to the notes and formula of the major scale, we end up with the G Dorian mode.

Does this explain to you how to interpret the scale formulas? Remember, all scale formulas are relative to the major scale, 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7.

If you think you understand this, write out the other 5 modes (Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian) in your next post to confirm.



Phrygian: 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7

G - Ab - Bb - C - D - Eb - F

I'd do the other ones, but I'm too lazy at the moment, thank you for your help.
#13
alot of times I don't usually use theory when writing a solo,


No one "uses" theory. Theory exists only to describe music and communicate it to others. What you mean to say is that you don't know why your music sounds the way it does, or why you're playing it the way you are. That is a problem.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.