#1
Hi i just bought a Tascam 8 track recording studio and now i'm looking for microphones to record with. The sound our band plays is metal/hardcore/heavy metal
i need microphones for drums, guitar, and vocals

First off i need drum mics, what do you suggest for a good sound but a good price too i'm willing to pay up to about 250 for a whole set of mics for drums

Secondly i need a guitar mic. i would set it in front of my marshall 1960 cab. I'm willing to pay up to 100 for this.

And vocals i don't know too much about, could i just use one of the other mics from above?

thanks
Dblanks
Shred

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#2
Audio Technica artist series. Best mics I have EVER worked with, and the price is very reasonable.

I've had very bad experiences with Shure mics. If you're going to get Shure, be careful, and watch out for reliability issues.
#3
for guitar a sure SM57 is a popular mic for guitar cabs that's fairly cheap and durable, and it won't color your sound very much by itself, the same thing goes for the Sure SM58 for vox.

If you want a whole set of drum mics, don't expect anything good for less than $500. and cheap drum mics tend to really really suck.
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#4
AKG 414 is a standard vocal mic, standard because its awesome.
but you could get away with a Shure SM58 too.

for drums, youd want the AKG D112 for the bass.
a couple of AKG C1000's for overheads, and SM57's for anything/everything else.

SM57's make great amp mic's too.
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#6
For not a ton of money for drum mics, what'll have to do is just use two mics as overheads, and a third as a bass drum mic. It'll work fine.

I'd pick up an SM57. They're an industry standard. Not only awesome for micing amps, you can you use them for micing pretty much any drum. I've heard rumors that the Chili Peppers used an SM57 as the bass drum mic for the Blood Sugar Sex Magik recordings. In fact, can someone confirm that?

EDIT: Oops, forgot, for a vocal you'll want a condenser mic. Someone above recommended something fine already.
#7
Condenser mics are great, but they cost a lot and require phantom power, and without a nice mic preamp they don't have much on a good dynamic mic, and since this guy is on a fairly limited budget, I'd say that's probably a no go.
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#8
SM57 will definitely cover all those, including drum snares, but if you can, try and spring for an Audio-Technica, IMO, they are by far the best in the business of recording and live sound. Literally indestructable. Like, you could probably find an intact AT mic at the site of a nuclear meltdown.
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#11
For kick drums, the Audix D6 is by far an industry standard. Much better response and results than the AKG 112.
#12
Here is what we used (roughly) for our drums on our album - a pretty inexpensive drum mic solution.

Kick - Sennheiser e602 (about $200 used - might find it for less)
Snare - Shure SM57 (about $75 used)
Overheads - Behringer ECM8000 (two of them at about $40 each.... new!)

This puts you only at about $100 over budget, but will yield some pretty decent results. Bear in mind that for the overheads, being condensors, you will need a phantom power source. A lot of interfaces provide this. I believe the Tascam you mentioned has this.

If you are doing hard-rock/metal, DO NOT skip miking the snare. A couple overheads and a kick is fine for some applications/genres, but by NO means will give you the result you want. You WANT the snare in your face, and the only way to get it there is with its own mic.

What we did for our album is bolstered that basic setup with a couple of other mics, to give us pretty much studio-quality drums:

Shure SM58 - between the two rack toms
Sennheiser e835 - floor tom
AKG C-something or other - hats

Also... you know that $100 over budget we had you at? Watch this...

The SM57 (or very comparable,... in fact, I like it better, Sennheiser e835) can do double-duty by doing guitar cabs too. You *can* do vocals with them, but there are much better inexpensive options.

Now you're back on budget!

For a cheap vocal mic, you can still stick with a condensor. MXL has a good one. Also look at mics from Rode and Studio Projects. Even Behringer has some decent stuff if that is all your budget will allow. They're SO inexpensive, and perform much better than a lot of the rhetoric out there on the net suggests. Surprisingly good for the price, and to get better, you typically have to go 2-3x the price.

In other words.... my Behringer mixer was about $550. The Mackie comparable, at nearly double the price, is essentially the same ball of wax - even according to a lot of credible sources. To get the comparable features on something like a Soundcraft.... probably $1200-ish.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Jul 6, 2008,
#13
what I want to know is why don't you consider only buying enough mics for a drum kit, and then instead of buying a mic for the guitars, use some of the drum kit mics. you'll save yourself at least $100

for the kit (depending on size) I'd use:
1 mic for each snare, tom, and bass - preferably 2 each for snare (top and bottom) and bass (in and out)
and then the standard 2 overheads

you might be able to capture the hi-hat with the overheads, but if you have troubles with that you can always stick a close mic on that.
#14
Quote by Hadeed
what I want to know is why don't you consider only buying enough mics for a drum kit, and then instead of buying a mic for the guitars, use some of the drum kit mics. you'll save yourself at least $100


That's been suggested twice already....

Quote by Hadeed

for the kit (depending on size) I'd use:
1 mic for each snare, tom, and bass - preferably 2 each for snare (top and bottom) and bass (in and out)
and then the standard 2 overheads

you might be able to capture the hi-hat with the overheads, but if you have troubles with that you can always stick a close mic on that.


It'd be nice to have this amount of flexibility, but it seems the OP is looking for something more budget-conscious than a lot of mics that won't necessarily contribute a lot to the mix.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
a little out of your budget, but these mics sound ridiculous on drums.. sennheiser e609 for kick, sm57 on snare, electro-voice N/D 308 on toms or sennheiser md504 on toms, the sennheiser md421 sounds awesome on floor tom, and two oktava mc-012's for overheads. and if you use room mics too then the crown pzm 30's sound cool. for guitar an sm57 and sennheiser md421 sound tight matched together, the 57 grabs the highs and the 421 grabs the lows, just beware of phase cancelation issues when micing the same source with two mics, but you should be good. the blue babybottle is amazing for vocals. all this gear is pretty pricey but keep your eyes peeled on ebay, musician's fleamarkets, craigslist, and classifieds. you never know what you'll find!
#17
Quote by rlavergne09
sennheiser e609 for kick,


The 609's are generally 'guitar' mics and are used quite often on guitar cabs - both live and for recording. The e602's are large-diaphragm dynamic mics and are made for things like kick drum. I'm quite happy with the results we got with mine for our album.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#18
You are correct axemanchris, i had just woken up when i posted that I had meant to say e602 but my mind was somewhere else i suppose thanks for the correction
#19
very easy mistake to make...

cheers!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.