#1
Ok, so ive been improvising blues (influences include Robben Ford, B.B. King, and the like) for about two years now, and for that time i was happy just playing the blues pentatonic. Now I feel that i could really use a new scale or two to breath new life into my playing. Any suggestions?
#2
The Mixolydian and Dorian scales are commonly used in blues, as is the major pentatonic.

If you want to get a little more interesting, look into scales such as Lydian Dominant or the Super Locrian (altered) scale.
#3
i like the aeolian haha ita pretty fun
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#4
thanks another question i have is that i feel that when i improvise im stuck inside a "box" that spans about 4 frets (so for instance if im playing in the key of A, the only notes that i use come from the 5th fret to the 8th fret) Is there any way to fix this without having to jump a whole octave?
#5
Quote by itsnotGreenDay
thanks another question i have is that i feel that when i improvise im stuck inside a "box" that spans about 4 frets (so for instance if im playing in the key of A, the only notes that i use come from the 5th fret to the 8th fret) Is there any way to fix this without having to jump a whole octave?

Learn the notes of the fretboard so that you think it terms of notes and intervals instead of patterns.
#6
Quote by itsnotGreenDay
thanks another question i have is that i feel that when i improvise im stuck inside a "box" that spans about 4 frets (so for instance if im playing in the key of A, the only notes that i use come from the 5th fret to the 8th fret) Is there any way to fix this without having to jump a whole octave?

It sounds like your stuck in 1 particular pattern. If you learn the 4 other patterns you will be able to play over the entire neck.

try learning all 5 of them: minor pentatonic scale in 5 patterns

also try learning:

minor blues
Major pentatonic
Major blues

I would suggest learning those, and learn some actual solos. Learn them, memorize them, be able to play them. You can learn alot from a Robben Ford solo.

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Learn the notes of the fretboard so that you think it terms of notes and intervals instead of patterns.


Great suggestion.

If you have time, learning the notes on the fretboard and the theory behind scales is a great idea. It will make alot of aspects of music easier to understand. I would just add though that ultimately you want to see it in terms of notes and intervals as well as patterns. (not instead of)
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 5, 2008,
#7
Whilst a lot of pieces will fall into different scales, chances are that most of the time the player simply approached it as a pentatonic scale with accidentals (notes that fall outside the scale) . A scale is a framework, there's nothing to stop you using notes outside of it provided there's enough underlying structure there to hold everything together musically.

Certainly if you're playing blues there's a danger of losing the "bluesy" sound if you stick rigidly to a scale that isn't traditionally associated with the genre, however by simply making judicious use of accidentals (which obviously won't be accidentals of other scales) you can add a lot of texture and colour to your playing without losing focus.
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#8
Quote by itsnotGreenDay
Ok, so ive been improvising blues (influences include Robben Ford, B.B. King, and the like) for about two years now, and for that time i was happy just playing the blues pentatonic. Now I feel that i could really use a new scale or two to breath new life into my playing. Any suggestions?
Can you play the changes? As in would you be able to play different pentatonic scales over different chords?

Also do you know much theory? I think you should study the major scale, the intervals behind it, the way these intervals create harmonic/melodic consonance and dissonance and watch melodic control by marty friedman. Just study as much theory as you can thats related to improvising.

Also, what do you know about modes?