#1
i bought a tascam dp-02fx/cd, althought i dont actually have it yet because its still shipping to the store. i need to mic my guitar into this, and the guy told me shure sm57s are pretty much the standard. theyre out of my budget though. however i have bunch of these in my basement (my dad is a magician and ventriloquist).
http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/AKG-D-9000-High-Performance-Microphone-Buy-1-Get-1-Free?sku=271142

how exactly would i rig one to mic my amp?


also, i play drums, and im planning on pretty much recording me as a one man band. if i saved up cash for a long while, i could get drum mics, but there are still only 2 mic inputs on the 8 track. if i use a few of the mics mentioned above spread out around the set, and record that way will it sound like sh*t?

im doing the best i can on a relatively low budget. thanks for the help.
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Samick UM-3
Ibanez Exotic Wood Series Acoustic- Burled Maple
Ibanez Artcore AWD-82
Ibanez ART-300
G&L Tribute series S-500
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Peavey XXX Super 40 EFX
#2
Those wouldn't be the best for room or ambient placement. They'd work for snares, toms and other percussion, but not so well for the bass drum. If you need to mic a drum kit with two mics there's several ways to go at it. One is mic the bass and snare, but you'll need a better bass drum mic. Another is two overheads. Jazz kits are usually recorded like this, but you be much better off using condensers. Third is room micing. Once again, condensers would be better. For what you have to work with, I'd go with overheads, but try micing the room as well. As for your amp, those mics will be fine. If your amp has two cones, put one mic in front of each of them and pan them left and right respectively. If it's one cone, record it in mono.
"There's Jimmy Page, one of the biggest thieves of American black music to ever walk the Earth."
#3
what will the difference be if i dont use condenser mics?
Godin LG Signature
Samick UM-3
Ibanez Exotic Wood Series Acoustic- Burled Maple
Ibanez Artcore AWD-82
Ibanez ART-300
G&L Tribute series S-500
Squier Bullet special
Cameo Hollowbody
SX tele with neck p90

Peavey XXX Super 40 EFX
#4
Condensers have a higher output, meaning they require less gain to get the same level as a dynamic with more gain. As you turn gain up you raise the noise floor, (audible hiss) therefore you will have more noise. Condensers also have better transient response, which means they react more quickly to sound. For hi hats which have a very quick attack and decay, this is very important. Condensers are also much more sensitive, so they will pick up the whole kit much better. The dynamics will work, but condensers will be better.
"There's Jimmy Page, one of the biggest thieves of American black music to ever walk the Earth."
#5
well if the ones i have will at least work, thats alright for now.
ill worry about making it better when i have some cash.
Godin LG Signature
Samick UM-3
Ibanez Exotic Wood Series Acoustic- Burled Maple
Ibanez Artcore AWD-82
Ibanez ART-300
G&L Tribute series S-500
Squier Bullet special
Cameo Hollowbody
SX tele with neck p90

Peavey XXX Super 40 EFX
#6
I would try to do at least two overhead mics...adding a mic to the snare and bass drum would work as well IMO if you can get two more mics and track them.

It would be best to get some type of firewire interface that can track each input to its own so its not all mixed but firewire can be high in price...

As for micing the amps, setup the mics as you would an SM57 but do a few recordings and then move the mic around some until you get the tone you like.

IMO, a computer based interface and software setup is the best way to go and you normally get the best quality for the price. You are also less limited than a multi track recorder.