#1
I'm reviewing key signatures, and being the efficient, memory-lacking person I am, I prefer a method that I can practice to identify things, rather then sheer memorization.

My question for you, MT regulars:

What are some methods I can use to identify a key signature without having to memorize each and every one?
#3
The circle of 5ths (and 4ths). It starts on C which is at the top with no sharps or flats. The to right is G with one sharp then D with two and so on. It just jumps a 5th each time. Going to other way, to the left of C is F with one flat then Bb with 2 and so on. Going to the left it jumps by a 4th. Then to find out what key has what sharps or flats, the order of flats are BEADGCF and sharps are FCGDAEB (flats backwards). When you have one flat, it's just Bb. When you have two, it's Bb and Eb. When you have three, its Bb, Eb and Ab and so on and the other way for sharps.
#4
Quote by beadhangingOne
Circle of Fifths---look it up

There's an article on this website all about it.



+1


It's the best way I think
#6
or you could use the technique i use which is less technical

for flat key sigs, cover the last flat and whatever note the flat previous to it is on, that is the key sig

for sharps, look at the last sharp and go up a semitone, that is the key sig
#7
Tbh, I just memorize it cold. No methods. When I try to master a new key, I look at all the possible chords that go into the harmony, and of course all the sharps and flats. Next time I think of G Minor, I think "2 flats", and I already know that they are B and E. That's it.
#8
It seems that with the Circle of Fifths you have to memorize the fifths. If for instance you want to find the key of Bmaj, then you have to memorize the fifths from C to B (CGDAEB), and then count the alterations, etc...

I still can't find a site with the complete method (or at least one which uses it), but under "interesting things to note" you can see two of them:

http://intellectualmusician.com/oakleaf/keysignatures

If someone knows a site with that method please tell me (I find it more useful than the CoF since CoF requires a lot of visual memorization, unless you have it nest to you)
#9
Quote by swell_bucket
or you could use the technique i use which is less technical

for flat key sigs, cover the last flat and whatever note the flat previous to it is on, that is the key sig

for sharps, look at the last sharp and go up a semitone, that is the key sig


Which one is the last sharp/flat? I've read about that method.
#10
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
Which one is the last sharp/flat? I've read about that method.


Major keys:
Sharps-Knowing the key, go down 1 degree to find the last alteration (use FCGDAEB to find others). Always in a sharp key the 7th grade is the one altered (when coming from tetrachords))
Flats-Knowing the key, the alteration is the previous to last counting from BEADGCF to the key (or go up 3 degrees). In flat keys, the 4th degree is altered
Minor keys:
Sharps-Knowing the key, go up 1 degree to find the last alteration (since major keys alter the 7th, and a relative minor is found going down 2 degrees, in a minor sharp key the 2nd is always altered (when coming from tetrachords again))
Flats-Knowing the key, go down 2 degrees to find last alteration. Same thing as sharp....


I can't find a site which explains it though, I think someone should write a lesson about it
#11
Gonzaw, that's an unusual way to look at it. I've never thought of it that way; instead, I just memorized all the keys straight up. It's really the only way that worked for me, although the CoF could be very useful for a beginner.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#12
An additional note: BEADGCF is an easy pattern to remember. It's the notes on a 7 string guitar (if you decided to tune to bottom two strings to perfect fourths in relation to the rest of the guitar.)
GANGSTAAAAAAS!

Chika! Chika! YEAH YEAH!

Quote by SG6578
That is regular hard maple...I'm 100% f*cking d*ck licking sure.
#13
Quote by Iron_Dude
Gonzaw, that's an unusual way to look at it. I've never thought of it that way; instead, I just memorized all the keys straight up. It's really the only way that worked for me, although the CoF could be very useful for a beginner.


The thing is, you don't have to memorize all the 24 (I think) keys, just memorize the methods....
You should also memorize which keys go into which classification (sharp or flat), like Fmaj, Bmin, Emin, etc....
#15
Quote by one vision
Tbh, I just memorize it cold. No methods. When I try to master a new key, I look at all the possible chords that go into the harmony, and of course all the sharps and flats. Next time I think of G Minor, I think "2 flats", and I already know that they are B and E. That's it.


Yeah, that's what I do. I only use the circle of fifths method for weird keys that I can't remember off the top of my head. Like F# Minor or something. The alternative is to learn the 3 semitone up/down trick to determine the relative major/minor, effectively halving the number of key signatures you have to remember.
#16
Quote by beadhangingOne
Circle of Fifths---look it up

There's an article on this website all about it.

Stole the words out of my fingers.
Quote by Albert Einstein
Nuh-uh. Nuh-uh. NUH-UH. NOPE. NO! NOPE! WRONG! NO! UR AN IDIOT! STFU! GTFO!



Quote by genghisgandhi
Eyebrows has no Whoopi Goldberg, for never is she surprised?