#1
So I decided to do something productive, and I was playing around with my acoustic and I came up with a progression that I like, and I know that it is simple. I couldn't really think of what to do after it though, so I figured that I should determine what key it is in.

It uses a D5, an F5 and a C5. I wrote out some of the major keys, so here is my dilemma:

Is it a I - Minor Third - Minor Seventh progression in D?
Or A
II - IV - I in C

I could list more, but what it really boils down to is how do I know which one to choose from?
#2
id say d as you are starting on d so it gives it that tonality
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#3
Quote by BobChicken
id say d as you are starting on d so it gives it that tonality
You know, I'd say thats the worst way of working out the key of songs. F isnt in the key of D. And inb4 "It's in the key of D minor" because C wouldnt be used in the key of D minor either.

I'd say its in either C or F, probably C as you resolve on C. If its in C the chord degrees are ii - IV - I. If its in F the chord degrees are vi - I - V. Either of those two scales would work. Whichever sounds best to you, use it. They wont sound that much different as theres only one note difference between them (Bb).

Edit: A# major might also work, which could work. It would mean a iii - V - ii progression. Interestingly, if you added thirds and sevenths to those chords and played Cminor for more measures than any other chord you would have yourself a nice C dorian progression.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Jul 6, 2008,
#4
Quote by demonofthenight
You know, I'd say thats the worst way of working out the key of songs. F isnt in the key of D. And inb4 "It's in the key of D minor" because C wouldnt be used in the key of D minor either.



what are you talking about?

D minor: D E F G A Bb C D
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#5
Quote by demonofthenight
You know, I'd say thats the worst way of working out the key of songs. F isnt in the key of D. And inb4 "It's in the key of D minor" because C wouldnt be used in the key of D minor either.

I'd say its in either C or F, probably C as you resolve on C. If its in C the chord degrees are ii - IV - I. If its in F the chord degrees are vi - I - V. Either of those two scales would work. Whichever sounds best to you, use it. They wont sound that much different as theres only one note difference between them (Bb).

Edit: A# major might also work, which could work. It would mean a iii - V - ii progression. Interestingly, if you added thirds and sevenths to those chords and played Cminor for more measures than any other chord you would have yourself a nice C dorian progression.


C is in D minor....
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Quote by phlip999
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#6
In minor progressions the bVII chord isn't used for various reasons. Instead a natural viio chord is used.

Although the natural minor scale is normally noted out like the relative major scale starting on a different note, in practice songs in minor tonality wouldnt use just those notes.
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#8
Quote by demonofthenight
In minor progressions the bVII chord isn't used for various reasons. Instead a natural viio chord is used.

Although the natural minor scale is normally noted out like the relative major scale starting on a different note, in practice songs in minor tonality wouldnt use just those notes.


It isn't used?

maybe not by you.
#9
^When thirds and sevenths are added, the bVII chord resolves too well to the III chord, which would mean the peice is in major, not minor. So the chord is changed to a vii full diminished chord, which moves really well to the i chord.
Quote by Guitargod12345
It is in D minor
Please explain your reasoning.
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#10
Quote by demonofthenight
^When thirds and sevenths are added, the bVII chord resolves too well to the III chord, which would mean the peice is in major, not minor. So the chord is changed to a vii full diminished chord, which moves really well to the i chord.Please explain your reasoning.



I reiterate.. maybe by you.

These are guidelines not absolute rules.

The resolution is only really strong if you make the bVii a 7 chord.

Thanks for the condescension though
#11
D5 contains D and A
F5 contains F and C
C5 contains C and G

Therefore you could say its in any key that contains A, C, D, F, G.

This actually could be in Bb Major....

But I'd say it's in D minor. Seeing as your starting on a D5
#12
Quote by mike
When thirds and sevenths are added, the bVII chord resolves too well to the III chord, which would mean the peice is in major, not minor.
Yes, it resolves well to III, but that isn't the only place it can move to. Chords don't have a will of their own. If you don't want to resolve it to III you don't have to.
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#13
Quote by demonofthenight
^When thirds and sevenths are added, the bVII chord resolves too well to the III chord, which would mean the peice is in major, not minor. So the chord is changed to a vii full diminished chord, which moves really well to the i chord.Please explain your reasoning.

^I get what you mean but don't entirely agree. Especially since there are no thirds or sevenths present in the C5 chord.

It's because of the flatted seventh note in the natural minor scale and the implications it has on harmonic values that we have the harmonic minor scale. But at the same time I have no problem with a G chord in an Am progression Am G F G is clearly an Am progression.

Personally I feel the flatted seventh in the natural minor scale makes the biggest impact in the v-i progression. The minor v just doesn't give the same pull toward the i as the V-i does. Compare Am Em Am to Am E Am. One just sounds so much stronger.

I am going to agree with the key of Dm.
My reasoning is simple and rather subjective. It is simply because when I play the chords evenly in the order given by the TS it just feels to me like Dm is the tonal centre.

However, I do agree that "since you start on that chord" argument is the worst way of working out keys for a song. For example if you tack an F5 at the end of the given progression you get D5 F5 C5 F5 which to my ear changes the tonal centre to F.
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