#1
Everything I compose uses the notes from only one scale, I have heard and seen very talented music where notes out of the scale are added in, and they fit perfectly well.

Now whenever I try to break away from the scale.. not modulate... jst add off key notes, (chromatics) i never know which notes I could use so I end up going through all the notes that are out of the scale and trying to fit them in.... This always results with a big fail, as all the notes I try to fit in just seem to make my ear cringe.

If I am playing in chords I would like to know how to make an altered chord that pulls towards another chord, apart from a secondary dominant.

I create acoustic music with a bass backing and melody line, and so knowing what chords or altered notes to put in would be helpful.

Another thing is modulation, I know the theory of this but whenever I try to do it, it always turns out sounding bad and it seems like a painful thing to do.

I know if I wanted to go from C to G I could do it like this...
(I am using all the chords in C to make the key obvious...)

C - e - d - a - C - G - a - F - C - G - a - D - G

Well, that doesnt really sound that good...

So basically, what I am asking is can you teach me EVERYTHING about off key notes, modulation, pulling chords or anything else to do with putting different notes into the music.

Or atleast put links to websites....

Thanks
#2
You're going to need to either seek out a qualified teacher or look for a university level theory text that can give you examples of modulation, leaning tones, non-tertian harmony, etc. because it is far too complicated for a forum response.

With your example you say it doesn't sound too good but have you played with the triad inversions or are your trying to modulate over all the chords having the tonic as the first note? Well chosen inversions are the trick to good modulation.
Quote by dale-banez

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#3
Quote by shredder.cheese

With your example you say it doesn't sound too good but have you played with the triad inversions or are your trying to modulate over all the chords having the tonic as the first note? Well chosen inversions are the trick to good modulation.


I never knew about this, I have always used the tonic, could you explain more?

Could you recomend any books i could buy?
#4
Here is a short example (sorry for how sloppy it looks) kinda based on your move from C to G. The triads are CM, Em, Dm, Am, CM, GM, DM7, GM. Look how some of the chords (triad arpeggios in this case) don't always start on the tonic of the respective chord. That is called inverting the chord. It makes a smoother melodic change when you modulate. The DM7 is the key player though as it gives a strong resolution for the key shift to GM because of the Gb leading tone.

|----------------------------------------------------------------------3----|E
|----------------------------------------------------------------------0----|B
|------------------------------------------------------------5--------0----|G
|-------------------------------------------2------------4------------0----|D
|---7-10----7-10----5--8------7----3------5-4--5---------------x----|A
|-8-------7--------5--------5-8----3------5------------------------3----|E


Edit: So in a sense you could have a backing track with a guitar or piano playing the chords in their normal uninverted form and play the triad arpeggios over them and the modulation will sound very smooth. Now this is just basic, it can be taken quite far if you understand pedal point, 4 part harmony, etc.
Quote by dale-banez

my gear:
oh wait, no one cares

Quote by uncboy19
man all guitars are female. if they werent you couldn't make sweet love to them with your fingers. ok somebody better quote that ****. thats like quantum guitar **** rite there.
Last edited by shredder.cheese at Jul 6, 2008,