#1
Hey guys, I'm trying to play "Dreamcatcher" by Andy Mckee but I'm having some trouble with it. At one part it goes into 6/8 time which is really foreign to me. How exactly do you count it? Most of what he plays is straight 16th notes. I'm just so used to playing in 4/4 that I can't slap the strings like he does.
#2
6/8 goes 1-2-3-1-2-3 (two sets of triplets in a measure).
Last edited by Arbitror at Jul 6, 2008,
#6
i find it hard to explain, but if you listen to it you should be able to get it. 6/8 is just dividing the measure into 6 beats instead of 4, tap your foot to it but instead of counting 1,2,3,4 1,2,3,4... count it 1,2,3,4,5,6 1,2,3,4,5,6... or 1,2,3,1,2,3 1,2,3,1,2,3.
#8
everybody who posted above me is an idiot^
let me give you the 411 on time signatures
its in 6/8
the 6 represents how many beats there are in a bar so it would be 1-2-3-4-5-6
the 8 represents how much a quarter note symbol is worth i.e. the quarter note in 4/4 time has the same value as an eighth note in 6/8 time
6/8 COULD also be thought of as 3/4 or 12/16 but it would be played twice as fast/slow
so the people who say to count 1-2-3 are incorrect
#9
Quote by JOE_DESTROYER
everybody who posted above me is an idiot^
let me give you the 411 on time signatures
its in 6/8
the 6 represents how many beats there are in a bar so it would be 1-2-3-4-5-6
the 8 represents how much a quarter note symbol is worth i.e. the quarter note in 4/4 time has the same value as an eighth note in 6/8 time
6/8 COULD also be thought of as 3/4 or 12/16 but it would be played twice as fast/slow
so the people who say to count 1-2-3 are incorrect

You can count 6/8 1-2-3-4-5-6, but it is NOT the same thing as 3/4 or 12/16- to use the phrase used so much here, time signatures are not fractions.

6/8 is a compound time signature. This means it is made up of sets of triplets, in this case two sets of triplets. One of these triplet notes is a quaver, or an eight note.

6/8 is the equivalent to 2/4 in simple time, so triplet quavers in 2/4 equal normal quavers in 6/8, and crotchets in 2/4 are the same as dotted crotchets in 6/8.

You should learn more theory before going around calling people idiots. And even then it isn't very nice.
#10
Quote by 12345abcd3
You can count 6/8 1-2-3-4-5-6, but it is NOT the same thing as 3/4 or 12/16- to use the phrase used so much here, time signatures are not fractions.

6/8 is a compound time signature. This means it is made up of sets of triplets, in this case two sets of triplets. One of these triplet notes is a quaver, or an eight note.

6/8 is the equivalent to 2/4 in simple time, so triplet quavers in 2/4 equal normal quavers in 6/8, and crotchets in 2/4 are the same as dotted crotchets in 6/8.

You should learn more theory before going around calling people idiots. And even then it isn't very nice.

i never said that 6/8 was the same as 3/4 or 12/16,,, i was saying how it WASNT the same and how 6/8 ISNT just counting 1-2-3 1-2-3
my writing skills arent that good srry
i know what im talking about its just hard for me to get my point across
#11
its like 2/4 with triplets...

Just count 1 beat for each triplet, then its 2 beats a bar... so 2 triplets a bar.
#13
Nearly everybody here is wrong. 6/8 is compound time and does not contain six beats per measure, it has two. Each beat has the length of a dotted quarter note, or three eighth notes.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Jul 6, 2008,
#14
Quote by JOE_DESTROYER
i never said that 6/8 was the same as 3/4 or 12/16,,, i was saying how it WASNT the same and how 6/8 ISNT just counting 1-2-3 1-2-3
my writing skills arent that good srry
i know what im talking about its just hard for me to get my point across
Joe - you are mistaken. Take a deep breath, put on your thinking cap and learn the 6/8 time signature:
Quote by JOE_DESTROYER
the 6 represents how many beats there are in a bar so it would be 1-2-3-4-5-6
This is by far the most popular incorrect statement in this forum. Fact: The 6/8 signature directs us to play two beats per measure.
Quote by JOE_DESTROYER
the 8 represents how much a quarter note symbol is worth i.e. the quarter note in 4/4 time has the same value as an eighth note in 6/8 time
I've never seen this error put quite this way, but it is nevertheless quite wrong. In 4/4 time it's true that the quarter-note does get the beat. In 6/8 time, however, it's the dotted quarter-note that gets the beat. There are four beats per measure in 4/4 time. There are two beats per measure in 6/8 time. In 4/4 time the beat pulse naturally subdivides into two parts. In 6/8 time the beat pulse naturally subdivides into three parts. About the only similarity between 4/4 and 6/8 time is that both time signatures use numbers.
Quote by JOE_DESTROYER
6/8 COULD also be thought of as 3/4 or 12/16 but it would be played twice as fast/slow
This is amazingly incorrect. In reality the time signature, except in rare cases, has no bearing whatsoever on tempo. An accurate interpretation of these three time signatures looks like this:
  • 3/4 - Three beats per measure. The beat consists of quarter notes that naturally subdivide into two parts.
    One representative measure = DA da da
  • 12/8 - Four beats per measure. The beat consists of eighth note triplets.
    One representative measure = DA da da DA da da DA da da DA da da

Quote by JOE_DESTROYER
so the people who say to count 1-2-3 are incorrect
In fact, Joe, if you're in 6/8 time it's absolutely necessary for you to count 1-2-3 2-2-3 / 1-2-3 2-2-3. Based on your earlier posts I imagine you're going to call me an idiot. That's fine, and you certainly won't be the first to do so. But this I know: 6/8 time means to play two beats per measure with the dotted quarter-note getting the beat.

All the best,
gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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#15
Check this out: http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/html/id15_en.html

When it comes to time sigs, you can always be sure that gpb0216 is right so make sure you read his post.
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#18
Count two beats...
Each beat is formed via a quarter note with dot (or point whatever), and each beat contains 3 eight notes as subdivision....

For 16th notes, count them like you would in sixtlets in a 4/4 time signature, meaning 121212 121212 etc (1 is strong beat and 2 weak beat I think)...
#20
gpb0216- eighth notes in 6/8 time are NOT triplets, a triplet is three notes played in the space normally occupied by two. The three eighth notes are played in the space of one dotted quarter and since a dotted quarter = three eighth notes it is not a triplet. It may have a triplet feel, but calling it that is incorrect. Individual note durational value and their relation to other notes does not change in different time signatures.
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#22
I taught myself how to play along with odd timings by using guitar pro and using its metronome. if you have access to that, try using that.
#23
Quote by zoomy74
gpb0216- eighth notes in 6/8 time are NOT triplets, a triplet is three notes played in the space normally occupied by two. The three eighth notes are played in the space of one dotted quarter and since a dotted quarter = three eighth notes it is not a triplet. It may have a triplet feel, but calling it that is incorrect. Individual note durational value and their relation to other notes does not change in different time signatures.
Thank you for your note, zoomy. You are absolutely correct, and I certainly understand that the three eighth notes comprising the dotted-quarter beat unit are not triplets. I only put that out there to help those folks who are stuggling with compound time signatures. The beat, and consequently the beat unit in compound time subdivides into three equal parts. But even though this feels like a triplet, it is tecnically not a triplet, as you have correctly pointed out.

Thank you again for the clarification.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#24
^ I wasn't trying to sound like a ****, just wanted to make sure everyone knew the difference.
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#25
Quote by zoomy74
^ I wasn't trying to sound like a ****, just wanted to make sure everyone knew the difference.
I'm very glad you pointed out the difference. Thank you again.
gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.
#26
gpb0216 thanks aswell, i'm having trouble understanding time signatures aswell