#1
i have come to some problems in my guitar playing , and i would appreciate if anyone has tips to help me . My main two problems are ...

1. I am stuck using the pentatonic scale too much , and when ever i play guitar i use that to play about 80% of the time .

2. Even when i do use the pentatonic scale i stick to much to its basic shape , and everything just ends up sounding like me practicing the scale , to memorize it.

I am really sorry if i am being unclear its the best way i can explain . I would really be grateful for help because i find myself playing the guitar less and less everyday because of these problems. Thank you very much
#2
Do you know the notes you are playing or are you seeing scales as nothing more than shapes?


knowing where notes are will really help you.
#3
This is why I recommend learning diatonic scales first, and then pentatonics. No worries though. One trick I like to do is to take a scale and start on any random fret, and go up and down the scale in that "position". This doesn't mean you should memorize all the positions, but it means you should know the notes of that scale fluently enough that you can just count them off in your head as you play them rather than resorting to learning box positions all over.

And to get unstuck from the pentatonics, learn some new scales. But don't just learn them, learn how the harmony behind them works, start with a simple 12-bar blues format, if you don't already know basic harmony.
#4
i felt that way for a while, but heres what i did:

1. Look up the interval patterns for scales and map out a box pattern for the scale

2. Presto, you have a box pattern that you can move around into different keys and they sound wicked cool. I'm having a blast with the minor diatonic.

But that is far as I have gotten so far so after you learn a couple box patterns you'll have to figure it out for yourself.
#5
Learn what the pentatonic scale is in relation to the other scales on the neck. The minor pentatonic is part of the minor scale, which has a relative major scale, to which you can play all the same notes to, and still be in key.

Then, learning the different positions of those same notes, as well as learning the scales in different patterns, will tremendously expand your ability.
#6
Learning "box scales" is only half the battle. To be efficient and sound harmonized with the music, you should learn at least basic theory of chord construction and harmony. But even that fact that you can learn box scales and make them sound good in your improvisation is a step forward. Just saying that there is more out there to experiment with.
#7
i think im going to try learning the diatonic scales , i saw a video on it and it seems to be just what i need to "spice" up my playing
#9
alright man, the solution is simple. you know pentatonics, i assume thoroughly. the only thing you have to do is add more notes. get a backing track, maybe a blues track with a 1-4-5 progression, and play your pentatonics. from there, add a note, maybe play a common lick, and substitute one note for an outside note (like the 6th, dorian note, or the 2nd, or 7th, i do em all in minor pentatonic shape). if you like the sound, find the note, plot it on some guitar neck diagram along with your pentatonics, and you've got a new map of notes to choose from. usually i substitute old rock licks with a 6th, or a major 3rd if i'm playing minor pentatonic, whatever you feel like hearing. hope that mess of advice helped!