#1
I don't know if this goes here so if it doesn't sorry. I'm writing out a guitar part for a song and would like to know how you would make a solo if what most of the song is between a few power chords and one sweep, like how would i know what scales to use and stuff?
thanks in advance.
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#2
To figure out the scale, you have to figure out what key the song is in. If you can figure out the notes that go with the song, you can figure out the key, and then the scale.
#3
yea well how would i do that, i barely know my theory.
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#4
learn your theory
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#5
I will, i'm planning on taking theory classes during the school year.
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#6
Quote by misfitsweare138
I will, i'm planning on taking theory classes during the school year.


Do it now. Don't limit yourself by saying that. Go to the library and get a few books. Check out some online tutorials (The ones on this site are said to have some errors, so I would suggest musictheory.net).
#7
Look at the notes that make up the chords and use them in your solo. They'll probably point to a specific scale, but if you don't know enough about scales you won't recognise which one. So it's a good idea to learn theory.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#8
Yea but what chord would i look at i'm mostly using power chords except for the one sweep at the beginning.
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#9
Look at all of them, and use all of those notes.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#10
Can you explain a bit better?
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#11
For your solo, use the same notes that you use in the chords.

If you use G5 F5 E5 chords, use the notes G D F C E B for your solo.

As I said before, those notes probably point to a specific scale (C major in my example) but if you don't know enough theory you won't recognise this.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#12
Ok so for example

e|
b|
G|
D|
A|7
E|5

That would be an A5 right?

and if i would add an additional 7 on the d string would the name change?
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#13
No because you are still using only two distinct notes, A and E. The extra 7 on the D string is just another A.

EDIT: And yes that is A5
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#14
Quote by Ænimus Prime
No because you are still using only two distinct notes, A and E. The extra 7 on the D string is just another A.

EDIT: And yes that is A5


Ok, thank you.
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#16
Quote by misfitsweare138
I don't know if this goes here so if it doesn't sorry. I'm writing out a guitar part for a song and would like to know how you would make a solo if what most of the song is between a few power chords and one sweep, like how would i know what scales to use and stuff?
thanks in advance.
Pretty much find the key of the song, in the same way Ænimus told you, and play the corresponding pentatonic. As in, if your song is in A major, you would play the A major pentatonic scale.

Here is a repost on mine on how beginners should learn to improvise, keep in mind it was written for someone else:
I think you should take it back a step. If I said you were playing major/minor scales (instead of pentatonics) would I be right? Well take a step back and start playing the simple pentatonic scales.

Once you've learnt a few shapes (2 or 3 is fine) of the pentatonic scale, you probably should try to focus on what you feel is the right next note and play REALLY slow. Try to listen to some of those slow expressive blues solo's to get what I mean. Whilst doing this, try to become proficient at moving around the fretboard and between shapes. Aim to be able to slide between 3 or 4 notes on the same string.
Copying a singers phrasing and rhthym is generally a good idea to when learning how to improvise. And I dont mean metal singers/screamers, who sing really fast. Copy something slow. This is how people started writing those slow blues solo's.

Doing this will get your phrasing (by copying those singers) and your technique (by moving between shapes) ready for doing some real solo's (as in, stuff that sounds good).

Than after you've got all that down and when you're good enough to say that you personally enjoy what you're playing (it took me a couple of years to enjoy my pentatonic wankery), you'll be ready to move on. Than study the major scale, the intervals behind it, the way these intervals create harmonic/melodic consonance and dissonance and watch melodic control by marty friedman. Pretty much look for and study as much theory as you can eat. And analyse solo's, ask yourself, why do they sound good?
At this stage you should start realising that the same note can sound better or worse over different chords and some notes sound better or worse when followed (or preceeded) by some notes. Exploiting this will enable you to control what you're solo's are going to feel like, instead of blindly looking for the right note.
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        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#17
Quote by VIRUSDETECTED
Do it now. Don't limit yourself by saying that. Go to the library and get a few books. Check out some online tutorials (The ones on this site are said to have some errors, so I would suggest musictheory.net).


Yea but problem is that i don't really understand it if i'm reading it, it helps me more if i have someone explaining it to me like a teacher.
Gear:

Guitars:
Strat rip off
G-400 alpine white (signed by Coheed & Cambria)
ESP MF-207
RG350DX

Amp:
Crate V50 112

Effects
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
#18
Quote by misfitsweare138
Yea but problem is that i don't really understand it if i'm reading it, it helps me more if i have someone explaining it to me like a teacher.


You need a music institute son