#1
ok guys
am 17 ...
i have an experience of roughly 2 years with the axe ...
i have taught myself and usually call up on rythm cz my fingers are not yet acustomed to fast tacky solos ....
so the question i pose now is ... i got a pal whose around 29 or something ... i drop in at his place from time to time to get some advices cz he plays quite well ... he also tells me he has learnt music theory for 10 years which,for me, is hard to believe ... anyways thats not my question ... he brags abt the theory ... not just the scales and all ... but the treble clef and **** .. i dun really think it has anythn to do with guitars ... i always thought clefs were with piano ... and then he knows how to write notes ... like on those 5 lines and all ...
he tells me 1 needs to learn this to master guitars ... so is it really true ?! learning scales are ofcourse understandable ... i just started with some COB riffs and have no problem in learning ... i practice them 7 hours a day ... and each day as i progress to the next song my heart keeps telling that what that fag told me is a bunch of lies ... what do u people think ?!
#3
You don't need to if you're happy with what you do.

If one day you find you want to play a classical piece and can't find a tab on the internet for it, you'll have to read sheet music. Which means clefs (not just for piano) and staves (those five lines). If you want to show other classical guitarist how to play one of your pieces you will have to write it out in standard notation.

It's not necessary to master guitar technique, which is what I think you're talking about. Don't learn it if you don't want to.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#4
Can somebody please translate this into English?
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Theory simply makes you a better musician, I can't believe we're still arguing about this.
#8
Quote by :-D
Firstly, not to be an ass, but are you serious?

i have a feeling that yes he is serious, which is why i will now smack my head against the brick wall until i break through the wall or stop breathing.

TS: treble and bass clefs are for music, ALL music. sheet music is universal and can be applied to any instrument. as for being a guitar master do you need to know theory and sight reading? i suppose not, you could figure it out for yourself over a period of say 40 or 50 years to get the basics down cold. but why do that when lots of people have already done that, made a recorded history of it and taught it to other people in what is called MUSIC THEORY.
#9
There's no way this is serious.

*reported* (and i'm putting a couple stupid quotes in my sig)
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#10
Quote by lumpy890
Theory simply makes you a better musician, I can't believe we're still arguing about this.

Unfortunately, this is always going to be argued.

Is theory required to play guitar and write songs? Nope. Does it help to know theory? Of course.
#11
I don't necesarily think that learning theory will help you be a great guitar player, but it will definately make you a better musician. You should at least try to learn sight reading, scales, etc. It will open new doors in your playing that you may have never known about, give you an explanation for why something sounds like it does, etc. Music theory is nothing more than a tool. What you build with it is the important thing.

The flip side of the coin, however, is your technical proficiency on the instrument. What's the point of writing a piece that uses sextuplets at 100 bpm if you can't play it! I believe you should spend even amounts of time on both your theory and your technicallity. But hey, be a mindless noodler all your life. The world sure doesn't have enough of those.....
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#12
Quote by lumpy890
Theory simply makes you a better musician, I can't believe we're still arguing about this.



As an advocate of learning theory I unfortunately have to say..... NO IT DOESN'T MAKE YOU A BETTER MUSICIAN. It certainly can contribute greatly to your understanding of music which can positively affect your musicianship, but it is possible to know alot of theory and be a horrible musician. its also possible to know absolutely no theory, and be an amazing musician.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 6, 2008,
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
As an advocate of learning theory I unfortunately have to say..... NO IT DOESN'T MAKE YOU A BETTER MUSICIAN. It certainly can contribute greatly to your understanding of music which can positively affect your musicianship, but it is possible to know alot of theory and be a horrible musician. its also possible to know absolutely no theory, and be an amazing musician.

+1. It simply makes becoming a good musician easier because you understand how things work together; it doesn't always immediately lead to an improvement.
#14
Quote by Iron_Dude
I don't necesarily think that learning theory will help you be a great guitar player, but it will definately make you a better musician. You should at least try to learn sight reading, scales, etc. It will open new doors in your playing that you may have never known about, give you an explanation for why something sounds like it does, etc. Music theory is nothing more than a tool. What you build with it is the important thing.

The flip side of the coin, however, is your technical proficiency on the instrument. What's the point of writing a piece that uses sextuplets at 100 bpm if you can't play it! I believe you should spend even amounts of time on both your theory and your technicallity. But hey, be a mindless noodler all your life. The world sure doesn't have enough of those.....


nothing else needs to be said.
you flame war hungry people might as well end it now -.- you're only gonna confuse the guy further on.
#16
I'm 16 and i start playing guitar around 1 and a half year ago. I do think theory makes understand many things better, and by understanding them, you can apply them better. By aplying them better you become a better musician. thats what I think about it. I have learned theory from the internet, but tis not that great because i dont have a feeling of compromise. Thats why i'll go to a music academy soon ;P.

anyways, if you dont want to learn that, just dont do do it. But its better if you do.
#17
Quote by DesolationJD
Hello guys, I am 17 years old. I have roughly 2 years experience with a guitar. I am self-taught and usually play rythym guitar because my fingers are not yet acustomed to fast tricky solos.

I have a friend who's around 29 or something. I drop in to his place from time to time to get some advice because he plays quite well. He also tells me he has learnt music theory for 10 years which, for me, is hard to believe. Anyways thats not my question. He brags about the theory. Not just the scales and all, but the treble clef and fecal matter. I don't think it has anything to do with guitars. Always thought clefs were for piano. He also knows how to write notes "like on those 5 lines" (he means on a stave) "and all".

He tells me I need to learn this to master guitar. Is it really true?! learning scales are understandable of course.

I just started with some COB riffs and have no problem in learning. I practice them 7 hours a day, and each day as I progress to the next song my heart keeps telling that what that homosexual told me is a bunch of lies. what do u people think ?!


fixed.

and In response: Everything he says is true, and you are a moron for thinking he's lying, no offence. If you've been playing for two years and still think cleff's are only for piano, and that guitarists don't need to read music you're doing it wrong.
My sig used to be so awesome it got me banned
#18
^Thank you for the great editing job.
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#19
Quote by Your_Dad
fixed.

and In response: Everything he says is true, and you are a moron for thinking he's lying, no offence. If you've been playing for two years and still think cleff's are only for piano, and that guitarists don't need to read music you're doing it wrong.

Your avatar holds true.
#20
Quote by Your_Dad
fixed.

and In response: Everything he says is true, and you are a moron for thinking he's lying, no offence. If you've been playing for two years and still think cleff's are only for piano, and that guitarists don't need to read music you're doing it wrong.


kk i get u ... am not really saying its not important, but am asking for ur opinions ... i tried the theory part but it jus doesn't get into my head ... i mean daym ... isnt it really supposed to be the practical work ?! i think its no sense worrying abt the notes and stuff when ur fingers cant move 3 frets smoothly ... its just a thought though ..

Ps.yeah its time the theory and practice warfare ends but that fag keeps bragiing daily ... quite irritating
#21
Tell the fag to stop braggin and teach you. One can only teach to those who want to learn. If you don't want to learn, fine. You can always be a lead guitarist for nickelback. The world doesn't have enough talentless, ignorant musicians.
Quote by Albert Einstein
Nuh-uh. Nuh-uh. NUH-UH. NOPE. NO! NOPE! WRONG! NO! UR AN IDIOT! STFU! GTFO!



Quote by genghisgandhi
Eyebrows has no Whoopi Goldberg, for never is she surprised?

#22
Just learn to shred, it's common knowledge that more notes = more emotion in your songs.


But really, theory is good.
Learning Children of Bodom riffs does not make you a good musician.
#23
Quote by Retro Rocker
Just learn to shred, it's common knowledge that more notes = more emotion in your songs.


But really, theory is good.
Learning Children of Bodom riffs does not make you a good musician.



Firstly yea i guess theory is an important part afterall ... after seeing ur response and all
Secondly i never said COB riffs are great ... because its not something u really need to say .. They are amazing man ... i mean like honestly i just used to dream abt learning them and now i know bed of razors and needled 24/7 and am in the process of learning punch me i bleed ... yeah true it might not make me a great musician but atleast am fulfilling my dream
#24
If all you do is tabs, than you dont need any more theory.

If you want to learn how to write properly (as in more than just simple riffs), or to improvise, or to sight read, or to transpose music, or to transcribe music (as in hear it and write it down), you will need theory.
So if you actually want to start being a musician and not just a guitarist, learn your theory.
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