#1
I need to write a song in the Key of Am but I dont know how? Im really strugling and getting frusterated and I cant figure it out. I no what Am chords are but I dont know what the key is? like what notes and what not.
#2
Quote by -Sharp-Shooter-
I need to write a song in the Key of Am but I dont know how? Im really strugling and getting frusterated and I cant figure it out. I no what Am chords are but I dont know what the key is? like what notes and what not.


ABCDEFGA
#3
so I can play any note I want? on any string? I guess im missing the point of it but I dont understand playing a song in the Key of Am
#4
You could hit A, B, C, D, E, F sharp, and G sharp...
A-E are naturals, F and G are sharps.
#5
Chords in the key of Am are as follows

C-Dm-Em-F-G-Am-B(m?)

if your writing a song use those chords in any order (but preferably starting with Am or C) and it will be in Am
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#6
Quote by Amade
You could hit A, B, C, D, E, F sharp, and G sharp...
A-E are naturals, F and G are sharps.

F# and G# occur in A melodic minor, which is not a key. The notes of A minor are A B C D E F G as stated above.

TS, you really need to learn your theory. Check out the theory sticky in the Musician Talk forums.
Quote by impeachpedro10
Chords in the key of Am are as follows

C-Dm-Em-F-G-Am-B(m?)

if your writing a song use those chords in any order (but preferably starting with Am or C) and it will be in Am

Why didn't you just start from A?
Am-Bdim-C-Dm-Em-F-G
More often than not Em will become E, however. And you'd want to generally start with an Am, not a C chord.

Also, it's not that simple; if you write a progression that resolves to C, you're in C and not A minor.
Last edited by :-D at Jul 6, 2008,
#7
How do you find that out then? I just simply tried to use the Father Charles goes down and blah blah blah...
#8
Quote by Amade
How do you find that out then? I just simply tried to use the Father Charles goes down and blah blah blah...

Learn your theory.
#11
Hey thanks, Ill try ready the music theory thread even though im taking lessons I still become very confused on what my teacher is telling me.
#13
For beginners, make sure you start with A minor and end with an E minor and then A minor. (Or if you want to sound smart, end with an A major after the E minor and tell him its a Picardy Third. Don't ask )
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#15
Quote by :-D


More often than not Em will become E, however. And you'd want to generally start with an Am, not a C chord.

Also, it's not that simple; if you write a progression that resolves to C, you're in C and not A minor.


Why would an E major chord be used? The major third interval doesn't fit in the key of A minor (G#). Is this only because G# is present in harmonic minor? I thought that was basically going out of key.
#16
Quote by silvadolla
Why would an E major chord be used? The major third interval doesn't fit in the key of A minor (G#). Is this only because G# is present in harmonic minor? I thought that was basically going out of key.

It's much more common to see an E chord because the G# is the leading tone and is a 7 as opposed to G, which is a b7. It opens up the opportunity for harmonic minor, yes, but the G# provides a stronger resolution back to the A minor chord because the semitonal movement is stronger than moving from G to A. That's why V-i and V7-i sound so well resolved.

Make any sense?
#18
Quote by XianXiuHong
Well the relative minor of Am is C major, which has no sharps or flats, so the key of Am has no sharps or flats.


You mean the relative MAJOR of Am is C major.

Am is the relative minor of C so the notes, chords, and the signature are the same. That doesn't mean they ARE the same thing because of the tonics (roots).
#19
Quote by :-D
It's much more common to see an E chord because the G# is the leading tone and is a 7 as opposed to G, which is a b7. It opens up the opportunity for harmonic minor, yes, but the G# provides a stronger resolution back to the A minor chord because the semitonal movement is stronger than moving from G to A. That's why V-i and V7-i sound so well resolved.

Make any sense?


ah well, i was familiar with the sort of cadence expressed by V7 I or V I on behalf of leading tones, but I didn't know that could be extended to V i / V7 i. Thanks for providing an explanation
#20
Quote by silvadolla
ah well, i was familiar with the sort of cadence expressed by V7 I or V I on behalf of leading tones, but I didn't know that could be extended to V i / V7 i. Thanks for providing an explanation

No problem, just try that out and you'll hear it. In particular, that V7 is so strong because the seventh of the dominant chord (D# in the key of A minor) is a half step away from the fifth of the tonic minor chord. The fifth is a very strong tone; therefore, you have two very strong semitonal movements (G#-A and D#-E) to the root and the fifth, which are the two strongest tones of the chord.
Quote by PanHead
Am is the relative minor of C so the notes, chords, and the signature are the same. That doesn't mean they ARE the same thing because of the tonics (roots).

And the intervals that comprise the scales.
#21
Quote by :-D

And the intervals that comprise the scales.


That's right. I should've mention that.
#22
Quote by PanHead
You mean the relative MAJOR of Am is C major.

Am is the relative minor of C so the notes, chords, and the signature are the same. That doesn't mean they ARE the same thing because of the tonics (roots).



Oh crap, I got mixed up lol.
#23
Derivation of the scale (A minor natural):

A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G# - Chromatic scale starting from A (1st note in scale)

The formula for a minor scale is WHWWHWW, so apply this:

A B C D E F G A
 W H W W H W W


And there you go. An A minor scale. Alternatively, you could use intervals:
*edit* I agree with Logz, it should be 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. (Original, 1 b2 3 4 b5 6 7)

Write down A major, then move the 3rd, 6th and 7th down a fret. Same result as formula.
Last edited by MopMaster at Jul 7, 2008,
#24
Using tones to construct the minor scale is not a good way at all to get into theory.

You should only use tones really to construct the major scales. Everything else you should really use intervals.

And your intervals for the minor scale are wrong.
If you want to use the natural minor scale (the most common one), which is a mode of the major scale (Aeolian), then the intervals are 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7.
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