#1
ive been into music for a while[4-5 years], and have been studying theory just as long. and one thing i noticed after getting more in depth into theory, ive lost alot of creativity in my writing [especially for piano]. anybody else expirience something like this?
Quote by HeretiK538
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#2
i totally started experiencing this
ive played guitar for about 7 years now and took lessons for five of them. as soon as i started looking into theory and scales and triads, i just started to lose my ability to just sit and write songs or transfer them from my head to the sheet. even though i still have a couple ideas i just think they dont even compare to my old ones.
i think ill try to give writing a break for a while and see what happens, or maybe just getting together with another musician and jamming may spark some creative flair again.
#4
i dunno how it is for koalabacon but for me at least its like im trying to specifically write something using he new scales and techniques without being able to open up my mind enough to use more than one type of skill
#5
Quote by HolyYetti
i totally started experiencing this
ive played guitar for about 7 years now and took lessons for five of them. as soon as i started looking into theory and scales and triads, i just started to lose my ability to just sit and write songs or transfer them from my head to the sheet. even though i still have a couple ideas i just think they dont even compare to my old ones.
i think ill try to give writing a break for a while and see what happens, or maybe just getting together with another musician and jamming may spark some creative flair again.


good to know im not the only one

ive taken a break from really writing anything serious. creative flairs come every so often, but currently i drive to write anything down.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#6
Quote by HolyYetti
i dunno how it is for koalabacon but for me at least its like im trying to specifically write something using he new scales and techniques without being able to open up my mind enough to use more than one type of skill


couldnt agree more
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#7
Quote by HolyYetti
i dunno how it is for koalabacon but for me at least its like im trying to specifically write something using he new scales and techniques without being able to open up my mind enough to use more than one type of skill

Keep in mind that theory is simply descriptive; it's going to describe what you write. Just start playing anything you feel like, and then analyze it theoretically to see how you can alter the sound to improve it. I personally know what I want to do beforehand in terms of theory but it may not work for everyone.
#8
okay sweet ill try that
i did that once before while just lying down and not really thinking but playing and came up with a really fun lick to play that actually sounded decent, but thanks and ill try that for a bit
#9
Quote by HolyYetti
okay sweet ill try that
i did that once before while just lying down and not really thinking but playing and came up with a really fun lick to play that actually sounded decent, but thanks and ill try that for a bit

Yeah; if you found something that sounds good, look at it from the theoretical standpoint of "Hey, why does this sound good?" If you study that you'll have knowledge that you can now apply in any situation.
#10
i havent expirience this really with the guitar as much as i did with the piano. its all perspective basically. i havent learned where each note is on every fret, so i figure when i improvise or make up something, i can play something blindly without worry what key, or chord or scale, or even how it will progress, my only conncern is if it will sound ok. on the piano however, i know where every note [and how to play every chord mode or scale] is and easily apply my knowlegde of theory to what im playing.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#12
^Even with a knowledge of theory, you don't have to "worry" about the key or scale. Just write the music, and analyze it theoretically after it's been written and sounds good to you.

Also, please don't double post; just use the edit button in the lower right-hand corner of your post.
#13
The same thing has been happening to me lately. The more theory I learn the worse I seem to get.

Before I would just hear something in my head and I'd try to play it. I had no idea what chords were what or what key I was in. I just memorized the different sounds.

Now that I'm learning theory I find that a lot of my songs are much more simple. I find myself thinking things like "gotta stay in key....I haven't learned how to effectively switch keys yet."

My solos are pretty simple too because I try really hard to define what scale I'm in and I rarely through in any outside notes.

I think it has to do with my mentality. I approach certain techniques and theoretical concepts in a linear fashion......learn concept A.....move on to concept B.....Review concept A......


It seems that I won't venture into unknown territory at all because I'm so concerned with getting really good at a concept before I move on.


Does this describe you at all?


Sorry if it seems like I was rambling I just really need to get that out.

The bright side is....is that I know I'll get better the more I learn. It's just a matter of training myself to think of music in a different way.
#14
yeah that sounds like it. i over analyze the music im playing and it creates problems with my own songs.
Quote by HeretiK538
Totally awesome, I love you.

Have my children.

#15
I started getting this after I recorded my last song.

I would do a riff, but that was it. Never progressed farther than a riff.

The whole key, scale thing never really bothered me because when I would write a song and I made did a riff I would see which scales that riff would fit into, then choose the scale that best fits the sound/mood you want the song to be.

After that, make the chord progression so it is correct to the scale(s) you are using.

I'm writing a song now, now that I bought my first tube amp , and I'm breaking the theoretical rules, the song is going to based on playing a melodic minor scale on the relative major.

So I'll work the progression around that to get it to sound the way I want.

Hope I helped.
My obligatory gear list

Guitars
Schecter C-1 Classic
Gibson SG Special
1987 Fender Strat
Epiphone PR-150

Amp and Effects
Peavey Valveking 112
Boss DD-6
Crybaby Wah-wah
Ibanez TS-9DX
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#16
I don't know what the finished product of a creative thought should be....I assume it's different for everyone.


Right now I'm kind of stuck applying music to theory instead of the other way around.

I'm sure that once I learn enough I'll be able to combine both styles of thinking. Instead of hearing "that noise that comes from the 3rd fret E string" I'll learn to hear G.

I'm thinking tomorrow when I'm practicing I'll just pound out something that I think sounds good without thinking about it. Then I'll tab it out and apply my new theory knowledge too it.

I think the ultimate goal is great working knowledge of theory with a great ear for experimenting.

It gets frustrating but I'm confident that everything will come with time and practice

As someone in the same boat as you I guess all I can say is keep at it and things will get better. Feel free to let me know how things work out for you.
#17
The fact is if a "educated" musician plays some odd diminished chord he's gonna find the scale a lot quicker than one who relies on sporadic and not always dependable "creativity". The "educated" musician can cycle through any number of motifs or moods based on that scale in less time than it will take your average "creative" musician to do the same. The "educated" musician has an arsenal of tools to draw from and grow whereas the "creative" musician will always be searching for that next note.

Applied music theory is like any abstract art; one day you just get it, assuming you constantly apply it to, and let it inform, your playing.