#1
Michael Angelo Batio, in a video of his, said that, "the key [to playing fast & accurate] is to play with as little motion as possible!"
If any of you have seen MAB's playing, you will notice that his fingers move awfully little.
One of the kinks I've noticed in my playing is that, my fingers move more than the required distance from the string being played.

One reason for this, in my opinion, is that, when I'm learning something new (with a metronome, of course) I tend to move my fingers away from the fretboard, in order to accomodate the slow tempo.

Would positioning my fingers, when learning, the way I would when playing fast overcome this problem?
You simply MUST check out my music on
Reverbnation Downloads available here
Myspace Streaming Only


Especially for fans of Tool, APC, Avant-Garde, Ambient music, rock instrumentals, and fans of music in general. Will not disappoint.
#4
he says that although he doesn't use economy picking lol
i think you can develop that technique when you gain more strength on your fingers. it doesn't matter much if you're playing slow. only when you're really REALLY shredding like he does. so until you're somewhere near that you don't have to worry about it. if you are already, well, pay attention to it then. keep your fingers very close to the strings.
#6
yeah... practice that way at different tempos... practice in front of a mirror too, it really helps. that way you can work on both your left and right hands at the same time...

Brett Garsed's first video also goes on about minimal movement. you start practicing like that regardless of how new the lick is.

richie kotzen also moves very little and shreds like a monster, particularly on his first reh video... scary stuff. i've only scanned thru that one so i'm not sure if he discusses it (watching it makes me cry, i apologise for not watching it from beginning to end properly)

the best advice i can possibly give is watch a few of your favourite players, notice how they pick and how they fret... and then start to slowly work on the same thing. it really helps not movin much... unfortunately i get too excited and start doin stupid things and forget all about technique... but at least i had fun doing it... enjoy
#7
yes practice as close as possible to the strings the pinky will be the hardest to keep close to the frets but stick with it and it will come eventually
#8
This used to happen to me. It was most noticable when lifting up my ring finger. My pinky automatically wanted to fly 5 inches away from the fretboard, causing way too much unnecesary movement. The only way I could correct it was to actually hold my pinky down with my right hand so that it wouldn't move more than about one or two centimeters from the string. Practice that for 20 minutes over the course of a few months and you'll be fine!
"It is always advisable to be a loser if you cannot become a winner." - Frank Zappa

The name's Garrett.

Gear and stuff:
Taylor 310
American Strat w/ Texas Specials
Ibanez JS1000
Vox Wah (true bypass & LED mod)
Dr. Z Maz 18 JR NR
#9
^^
Yeah, the pinky's a real bitch. It's almost impossible to keep it down with just sheer intention. External forces are required. =P
You simply MUST check out my music on
Reverbnation Downloads available here
Myspace Streaming Only


Especially for fans of Tool, APC, Avant-Garde, Ambient music, rock instrumentals, and fans of music in general. Will not disappoint.
#10
also play everthing slowly at a speed where u can keep it down and do finger independance exercises from troy stetina's speed mechanics book
#11
yeah... speed mechanics is a great book... and those exercises really challenge you... thanks metal, forgot all about troy
#12
I have a MAB video. He tells you to do exactly what you descibed. He calls it economy of motion. "In order to play fast you have to play slow". Play slowly and concentrate on being efficient ( no unessisary extra motion in either hand right or left) as you play then slow increase your speed. Your burning the motions into your brain.

Why do you think Mr. Miagi had the karate kid going wax on wax off all day? The kid wanted to kick some ass with serious karate but was only doing god damn wax on wax off all day but he didnt realize he was burning a karate move into his subconcious. Its almost the same thing.
#13
Quote by sTx

One of the kinks I've noticed in my playing is that, my fingers move more than the required distance from the string being played.


I'm not very familiar with MAB'sstuff, but this principle goes back a long way. I didn't really become aware of it till I started playing classical guitar. I had a really good teacher who got on me about it. The pinkie has a tendency to pop up, and it's a tendency that it is best to master. The key thing is that it is also wrong to use tension in your hand to hold the pinkie (or other fingers) in place. You need to get to a point where your fingers are really independent. I'm still working on this, and I suspect I always will be.

It is when you are playing slow that you need to focus on this. It needs to become the way your hands naturally move. What I really took away from studying classical for a while was a practice technique of playing at very slow tempos, but being absolutely concentrated on the muscles in the left hand, striving to get everything perfect. My hands still move too much when I increase the tempo, but they have quieted down a lot in the last few years.

But, before you even start thinking about this, make sure your LH position is good. The thumb should be low, and should hardly press on the neck (the weight of your arm should hold the strings down, _not_ pressure from the thumb- you should be able to play a full barre at the first fret on a nylon string guitar with the thumb not touching the back of the neck). The knuckles of the LH should be in front of the fretboard. The LH should not be angled- the knuckles should be parallel to the line of the fretboard. It's important that your LH fingers are spread, not touching at the first joint. If any of those things are off your hands will move too much no matter what you do.
#14
Quote by mezzopiano
But, before you even start thinking about this, make sure your LH position is good. The thumb should be low, and should hardly press on the neck (the weight of your arm should hold the strings down, _not_ pressure from the thumb- you should be able to play a full barre at the first fret on a nylon string guitar with the thumb not touching the back of the neck). The knuckles of the LH should be in front of the fretboard. The LH should not be angled- the knuckles should be parallel to the line of the fretboard. It's important that your LH fingers are spread, not touching at the first joint. If any of those things are off your hands will move too much no matter what you do


You NEED to help me!
You simply MUST check out my music on
Reverbnation Downloads available here
Myspace Streaming Only


Especially for fans of Tool, APC, Avant-Garde, Ambient music, rock instrumentals, and fans of music in general. Will not disappoint.