#1
I really don't know why but I decided today to learn the fife.

Anyone here play one? I'm having some problems getting a note out of the thing! What's the embouchure technique?
#3
[quote="'Tommy[fin"]']Are you going to participate in a US civil war re-enactment?


I knew that was going to come up.....don't give me ideas!
#5
Quote by Retro Rocker
Yankee Doodle. Do it.



I love you.


I still can't get a note out of this damned thing!!!
#6
embouchure is your mouth and lips (for trumpet players at least), how you use them to create notes. it takes training to have a strong one, and that's where it gets stronger over time.

you just keep playing, and the yankee doodle will come.
#7
I'm pretty sure that's the way you form your lips..or something? I heard about it a lot when I played trumpet. You have to purse your lips together like you're pouting, and blow..I think?

P.S. Thane of Fife

EDIT - what he said ^
#8
Quote by MasterMongoose
embouchure is your mouth and lips (for trumpet players at least), how you use them to create notes. it takes training to have a strong one, and that's where it gets stronger over time.

you just keep playing, and the yankee doodle will come.



I play clarinet so I should have strong embouchure.
#9
Quote by The Internet
Fife

The fife is a member of the transverse wind family (don't let anyone call you that). It is a very simple instrument, essentially a wooden tube with 7 holes drilled in it and a cork (just beyond the blow hole) used to adjust the tuning. Chosen as a military instrument because of it tremendous volume, a really good fife player can clear a room in less than 2 songs. Much of the appeal of the fife is best noticed at distances over 500 yards. Using this to advantage highwaymen would often use fifes stopping wayward carriages with a downed tree and declaring "Your money or I'll fife!" There is reference to Martin Luther being accompanied by fifes and drums during his graffiti phase in Wittenburg and prior to the Diet of Worms. The fife was used militarily (as both singaller and entertainment) through the 18th century and the early 19th ultimately being replaced by the bugle.

That doesn't seem so hard.
#10
It looks like it's a version of a flute so I'm guessing the embouchure is something like that. What you do is try to whistle, but don't move your lower lip as far out.
#12
Quote by hippiebass
It looks like it's a version of a flute so I'm guessing the embouchure is something like that. What you do is try to whistle, but don't move your lower lip as far out.

I'll try this....
#13
[quote="'Tommy[fin"]']Can I be Robert E. Lee?

I'll bring the schnapps.


Be my guest.......I'll bring the drums too.