#1
For a long time, I've been playing jazz. Problem is, I've been playing in on trombone. After picking up guitar, I decided to begin playing jazz. At private lessons, I learned some chords, the comping process, and began practicing with a fake book.

Our jazz band only has 2-3 people trying out for the open guitarist spot, and I'm one of them. While the advantage I have is that I'm the only one who has played jazz before in said band, our instructor knows I'm a competent musician, and that I know about jazz style and balance, guitar is a newer instrument to me. Some of the basics, such as non-chordal sight reading, are fuzz and need work. We'll be given music and work on it all week, and try-outs are at the end of the week. As a rhythm member, my try-out will take place as I play with the rest of the band, not individually, so obviously I have to pay attention to balance.


This being said, what would you all suggest as a good practice routine to prepare for the audition? I have a basic library of chords given to me by my instructor, but I assume I need to:

1. Work on sight reading.
2. Touch up on reading treble clef.
3. Learn movable chord forms.

I would appreciate ANY advice at all, especially from people who have been in the same situation as myself. Thank you.
#3
Thanks for the reply, but I'm asking for an actual routine, or a list of the key things to devote the majority of my time to.
#4
^well that site is good for chord knowledge. as far as sightreading/treble clef goes, just open up your real book and go through as many tunes as you can. To improve overall, just listen to tons of jazz, and transcribe any interesting solos you hear. figure out what they're playing.
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#5
Alright, I guess jamming through the fake books and doing some sightreading is my best bet, eh?
#6
sightreading really helps, and also study which 7th chords go in the key that you are playing in. 7th, 9th, and #13th chords help to make the jazz world go round
#7
I have a .pdf of a book you might like called Sight Read Any Rhythm Instantly - Mark Phillips. If you give me your email i could send you it. I've skimmed through it and it looks pretty good. I haven't read it yet.


Definetly work on your chords. Look at the different ways you can play each chord, their voicings, substitutes, anything and everything.
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#8
whats a fake book?
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#9
Quote by 812many
whats a fake book?

It's a book composed of a bunch of transcriptions of songs. They are notorious for incorrect information. They are also illegal because they don't give royalties to the songwriters. They'e called fake books because you can go to a gig, open up the book, and "fake" a song. "Real books" are the legit versions (even though i have an illegitimate copy of The New Real Book. (if you want a copy, tell me)
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#10
Don't go playing extended chords randomly, just stick to the basics. If it's a big jazzband, the last thing you want is clutter up the sound. The most important notes of any chord are the third and seventh (or sixth if it's a C6, Cm6 etc). Learn how to play those two notes and connect them from there to the next. I think staying on the A-D-G strings would be best so you don't go in other registers.

1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.
--------------------------
--------------------------
5---5---4---4---2---2---0-
5---4---4---2---2---1---0-
--------------------------
--------------------------

^Just an example of Autumn Leaves.
1. Am7
2. D7
3. Gmaj7
4. Cmaj7.
5. F#m7b5
6. B7
7. Em

Also, search for 'Freddie green style comping' or anything that looks like that.
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#11
Quote by metal4all
It's a book composed of a bunch of transcriptions of songs. They are notorious for incorrect information. They are also illegal because they don't give royalties to the songwriters. They'e called fake books because you can go to a gig, open up the book, and "fake" a song. "Real books" are the legit versions (even though i have an illegitimate copy of The New Real Book. (if you want a copy, tell me)


that would be really cool. pm me or something?
If you want to jam in/around Mooresville NC message me.
#12
Yeah if you're big band, learn your 3-note chords. They are the most useful in numerous styles. Some teachers refer to them as "Shell voicings" as they only use the root, third, and seventh. I'd stick with them until you've really got an understanding of extensions and such. Also, I know all sorts of chords for jazz, all the drop-2s and 3s and inversions and I still like my shell voicings cause they're just so versatile and easy to throw down.

And yeah, work on your reading, etc etc. There's really no "routine" to it. Just work on what you think you need to work on, man.
#13
I'm going to agree with elvenkindje to some extent. If you are trying out for an accompaniment position you will be judged on how well you fill that position. The best thing you can do is go to the band-leader and find out what kind of accompaniment he is looking for (it helps that you know him). Maybe it's Freddie Green chords (and yeah, hard to go too wrong with that, except they sound funny on a solid-body), maybe it is more sophisticated comping- you won't know till you ask. Push him to be more specific until he runs out of patience. If he doesn't know because he doesn't play guitar, make him sing it. If I have one piece of advice to give younger people it is this- go ask for what you want. They aren't handing it out on street corners man.

Once you find out, practice it. And elven is certainly correct that most guitarists are way too focused on the root, as they mainly play in their bedrooms- it's important to understand how your playing should change when you play with a full ensemble.

EDIT: and oh, if your band-leader has ears, the main thing is to groove. Everything else is easy to fix. Lack of groove is a problem.
#14
Quote by metal4all
I have a .pdf of a book you might like called Sight Read Any Rhythm Instantly - Mark Phillips. If you give me your email i could send you it. I've skimmed through it and it looks pretty good. I haven't read it yet.

Just saw this, can you mail it to me? Email address is pretty obvious with [my username from ug]@hotmail.com

Cheers
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#15
for learning sight reading and whatnot try out the trainers in musictheory.net