#1
So, I've been playing a while, but know hardly any theory. Lately I've been trying to learn, though.

Anyway, I play alot, but just whatever pops in my head. I think I have the ability to solo well, but my fingers aren't sure where to go. I figure if I understood how scales worked a little more, it would help.

So, say I was playing something bluesy, I would most likely want something in the minor pentatonic, right? So if they chord progression was, i don't know, E A D Bm. I think that's A major key? Would I solo on E minor pentatonic then A minor pentatonic, then D and so on? Or would it all be on A?

Or am I just completely off?

Any help is appreciated.
#2
you don't have to change scale for each chord you play :P that's just silly lol
#3
Quote by RCalisto
you don't have to change scale for each chord you play :P that's just silly lol



So I would just play on an A scale?
#4
uhmm yes, A major or A minor would do.
you could also play E minor, D major, bla bla bla... you know...
#5
Quote by RCalisto
uhmm yes, A major or A minor would do.
you could also play E minor, D major, bla bla bla... you know...


What? No. If the tonal center is A, you are not using the E minor or D major scales.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
uhmm i don't know what you mean exactly..
he wrote some random chord progression, and i've said some scales that have those notes... that's it...
#8
And once you have the scale, are any of the notes in the scale okay to play in any order?

Thanks for all the help guys.
#9
Quote by NimbleElephant
And once you have the scale, are any of the notes in the scale okay to play in any order?


Yes. It's important to keep in mind, though, that some notes may sound dissonant depending on which chord you're playing over (e.g. a natural fourth over a maj7 chord) This doesn't mean that you should necessarily avoid them, but it's important to be aware of the sound that they produce.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
Quote by Archeo Avis
Yes. It's important to keep in mind, though, that some notes may sound dissonant depending on which chord you're playing over (e.g. a natural fourth over a maj7 chord) This doesn't mean that you should necessarily avoid them, but it's important to be aware of the sound that they produce.


Thanks man, you've been a lot of help.