#1
hey all my knowledge of musical theory is very basic so please forgive me

first off i want to ask the question how do you find the key of a song, ive heard that frequently the first chord of the song is usually the key the song is in, is this true?

secondly how do i know what scales i can use for that key ex. say theres a blues song (i pretty much only play blues/classic rock) in A what i do or have learned anyways is to use a l-lV-V pattern which means to me is in a the key of A the first, fourth and fifth notes in that scale are the ones you can solo with for instance you can use a A scale, a E scale and a G scale to solo with, im not sure if this is correct, if not could someone please explain that or elaborate on this please. or am i way off on the l-lV-V thing? lol

and lastly what key is the song Layla by Derek And The Domino's and what keys can i solo with?
Gear


- Epiphone Les Paul
- SX Strat (w/ Fender Vintage Noisless Pickups, TBX Control, and an active circuit board for +25dB mid boost)
- Marshall DSL40C
Last edited by Led Head at Jul 7, 2008,
#2
When I play blues, every chord has its own Key. So The A7 Chord that you start with would be in the key of Dmaj or A mixolydian. Then The IV chord (D7) Would be Gmaj or D Mixolydian. Finally on the last chord V or E7 would be in the key of Amaj or E mixolydian. As far as soloing, you can play the mixolydian mode over every chord. The root of the scale will change to the chord it is being played over. Then on the turnaround at the end I'll through in some A blues scale riffs.
If you get board with that, you can play E melodic minor scale over the A7 chord, A melodic minor scale over the D7 chord, and finally B melodic minor scale over the E7. That will give a nice jazzy feel to your solo. Also remember not to ramble when you solo. Try to repeat some riffs. Repetition really draws in the listener.
#3
Layla should be in the Key of D minor or F Maj, but I think it changes during the verse or chorus.
#4
1) If you are playing a 12 bar blues in the key of A (Major or minor), then yes, you solo in A minor pentatonic (notes I, III, IV, V, VII and octave) and you can move that pattern around WHEN you play the fourth D and the fifth E, but it will sound pretty bad if you solo in D or E when you are playing the A section of the song.

2) I didn't listen to the song, but you solo in the same scale as the opening riff. Which I believe is D minor pentatonic form. So you solo in that key.
Lyrics: Time wasted between solos.

After a mindboggling 3-hour Steve Vai concert, I had to listen to some brainless guitar playing... so I put on Nevermind...

Jesus Rocks!
#5
The only thing is, in blues you use Dominant 7 chords that do not resolve to its I chord. So in jazz you can Play a melodic minor scale who's root is a fifth above the root of chord. Technically you aren't playing the melodic minor scale though. You are actually playin the Fifth mode of a melodic minor scale. That is why the root is different from the root of the chord.
#6
Led Head, if you don't have a good grip on pentatonics and blues scale, keep practicing them. Otherwise. Try to change keys with every chord
#8
all you need is natural minor,harmonic minor, dorian, blues scale minor pent major pent and the major scale for blues. play around with those

your not really changing keys as what ever the progression resolves which would be A in this case it is just a scale variation of A
#9
Quote by Schizovation
The only thing is, in blues you use Dominant 7 chords that do not resolve to its I chord. So in jazz you can Play a melodic minor scale who's root is a fifth above the root of chord. Technically you aren't playing the melodic minor scale though. You are actually playin the Fifth mode of a melodic minor scale. That is why the root is different from the root of the chord.



see i have a problem with that statement

i use a progression E7 A7 B7 and by ear it want to resolve quite strongly back to the I chord
#10
i know my pentatonic and blues scales like the back of my hand and how to transpose them to different notes, but i dont know the dorian and minor/major very well :p

so from what i understand from what you guys are say is that you only solo in the key of the opening riff and is that the only position you can solo at, along with its octave partner? again im very sorry if this sounds retarded but my musical threory knowledge is very lacking (something im hoping to change)
Gear


- Epiphone Les Paul
- SX Strat (w/ Fender Vintage Noisless Pickups, TBX Control, and an active circuit board for +25dB mid boost)
- Marshall DSL40C
#12
Quote by Led Head

so from what i understand from what you guys are say is that you only solo in the key of the opening riff and is that the only position you can solo at, along with its octave partner? again im very sorry if this sounds retarded but my musical threory knowledge is very lacking (something im hoping to change)


"Opening riff" has nothing to do with. Most songs are entirely in 1 key. They may
move a bit out of key and back again or they may chnage key entirely for a while.
Usually you'd fit your solo to be "in key" in some manner, but there's a number of
ways to go about it.

Position on the neck makes absolutely 0 difference. You can always use any part
of the neck you want.
#13
Quote by one vision
Technically you don't change keys with every chord, or at least it's not advisable.


why not? i mean if your song is Em, C,G,D why not play the scales over those chords and highlight the chord tones? it'll sound good.
#14
Quote by Led Head
hey all my knowledge of musical theory is very basic so please forgive me

first off i want to ask the question how do you find the key of a song, ive heard that frequently the first chord of the song is usually the key the song is in, is this true?

secondly how do i know what scales i can use for that key ex. say theres a blues song (i pretty much only play blues/classic rock) in A what i do or have learned anyways is to use a l-lV-V pattern which means to me is in a the key of A the first, fourth and fifth notes in that scale are the ones you can solo with for instance you can use a A scale, a E scale and a G scale to solo with, im not sure if this is correct, if not could someone please explain that or elaborate on this please. or am i way off on the l-lV-V thing? lol

and lastly what key is the song Layla by Derek And The Domino's and what keys can i solo with?



1. Well its not 100% true but for classic rock and stuff its a safe bet. Play around using the other scales you think it is. e.g. say the progression is A to D and you think its Dmajor, play around on the Dmajor scale, it might sound ok over D but the sound will want you to rest on the A. Music naturally resolves on something, my best advice would be learn scales, then apply them to the fretboard,then jam with them over progressions (Y).


2. Yes you can just run up and down the A minor/major pentatonic. Alot of guitarists just do this and add in "passing" notes, which simply mean any fret on the way to the next note. Think of heartbreaker theres a few in there. Anyway, yeah if your shreddin it up over the A you can use your minor/major pentatonics, then say it goes to D, you can still keep using the A scale over this and it'll sound fine (both chords are in the same key) but you could also use a D major scale over the chord, get used to just using one scale then worry about mixing it up.


I = 1
IV = 4
V = 5


Right. Thats what those roman numerals translate to. We use these so we dont get confused with chords that are written like Asus2. The less you need to read while your playing the easier.


The 1st (or I) chord is the first chord of the scale. So in the A major scale


A B C# D E F# G# A


We see the first note is A. To make a major chord you take the First, 3rd and 5th note of the scale.


A + C# + E = A major, play it on your guitar and look at the notes your holding down, i bet its those.


Do the same with the others (D = D F#A) (E = E G# B). Thats your 1 4 5 progression.


Change the key, C major.


C = C E G
F = F A C
G = G B D


You should see its all the same, to figure out the scales, i recommend lookin up some of the lessons here and that should go into detail with you on it.


Ill help you out, this tab comin up might not be perfectly inline but its good enough to read.


e-------------------------------------5--------------------
b-----------------------------5-7-9-----------------------
g-----------------------6-7-------------------------------
d----------------6-7-9------------------------------------
a---------5-7-9-------------------------------------------
e--5-7-9--------------------------------------------------


Thats your Major scale. To figure out which one, figure out hte first ntoe you play. In this case its A. So its the A major scale. Move it down to the 3rd fret its the G major scale. Move it to the 8th fret its the C major scale etc etc.


Using that you can work out what scales have what notes and then use your chord building on each one to figure out the chords.


Hope this helps man, peace out (Y)