#1
I've been playing guitar for 10years but never learned scales (yeah I know, it's a shame). I used to figure out some songs by ear, but when I got internet I practiced with lots of tabs. I know chords and can do some solos (not my own). I can play tons of songs but I've made up only like 3 songs myself and many pieces of songs. However I've been stuck at a point for a longtime and really want to be able to solo and write my own stuff much more easily.

I started making myself practice scales, up and down, its boring, but I know i have to learn it so i make myself do it. That's why I put it off so much because it wasn't interesting at all. I've also been messing with finger picking style on my acoustic.

I would like information on what else I need to learn. I've been going over chord theory and I've got down 10 forms that can play anywhere on the fretboard and was doing them in the cycle of 4ths.

I know i need to learn more scales and chord theory but would like some pointers so I can finally get to the next level of playing I should of been at years ago.
I need to know where do I go from here? What should i learn next?

Thanks.
#2
Playing scales up and down? Well what kind of music do you like to play? Try improvising and go out of the scales, it opens a lot of doors and all.
Gear:

Guitars:
Takamine Gs330S
Fender Standard Stratocaster
Ibanez RG3EXQM1
Epiphone SG G-310

Amps:
Crate Palomino V16

Pedals
Ibanez TS9DX
Line 6 Tonecore Uber Metal
#3
Practice What U Want To Do And That Will Help You Out Practice With A Metronome If U Want Accuracy It All Depends On The Style U Desire To Play In
#4
umm learn music theory that usually helps cause sounds liek if you've been playin for ten years but havent learned much scales then you prolly dun know much music theory I've been playing for two years and I can kinda solo with the blues scale.
Quote by Stress Cow
You know you're fucked up when the pit thinks you're a sick bastard.
#5
I started making myself practice scales, up and down, its boring, but I know i have to learn it so i make myself do it. That's why I put it off so much because it wasn't interesting at all.


You don't need to play scales "up and down" if it bores you. Do you understand that they are a selection of notes from the 12 possible notes, and that you can play them in any order or combination? "Scales" are fun whenever you get to explore their possibilities. Try different combinations of notes to create chords, or different patterns (say, up 3 notes, down 2, repeat) to create sequences.

I would like information on what else I need to learn. I've been going over chord theory and I've got down 10 forms that can play anywhere on the fretboard and was doing them in the cycle of 4ths.


Well, that's well and good, but start experimenting and composing. It's not a matter of how much you know, its how well you know it.

I know i need to learn more scales and chord theory but would like some pointers so I can finally get to the next level of playing I should of been at years ago.
I need to know where do I go from here? What should i learn next?


For now, i'd recommend having some more fun with the theory concepts you have, that'll do you good in so many ways.
#6
Quote by Metal Society
Practice What U Want To Do And That Will Help You Out Practice With A Metronome If U Want Accuracy It All Depends On The Style U Desire To Play In


Wow, that gave me a flipping headache...


To TS:

Learn TRIADS. They are the basic bones of any chord.

Start with your major triads, then minor, then augmented, then diminished. Learning these will help you understand what to play, when to play it, and why you should play it. Take a step back from soloing in full scales and create solos using triads or chord tones, then progress from there.

The way I was taught was, "Learn to control the notes of a triad. If you don't have control over those 3 notes, what makes you think you can control all 7?"

Hope this helps, and good luck.
More UltraMatic than you.
#7
Quote by UltraMatic4

Learn TRIADS. They are the basic bones of any chord.


Good idea. To expand on that, every key has 7 diatonic triads you can potentially
use anywhere. The triad you use doesn't always have to be the base chord
tones. Emphasising triads is a good starting point for building an interesting
melodic line.

Another thing you can do with triads is triadic generalization. It's a pretty simple
technique and sounds good -- you only have to really know 3 notes. For example,
say a progression was in the key of C major. You take the 1 3 and 5 or C, E, and G.
Those are your "emphasis" notes. Basically, the Chord Tones (CT).

Now to fill it out, we'll use a couple of simple rules to get the Upper Neighbor Tone(UNT) and Lower Neighbor Tone (LNT).

The LNT is simple -- it's ALWAYS a chromatic, half-step down from the CT.
The UNT is ALWAYS the next higher diatonic note -- might be a whole or half step.

So, knowing only the 3 CT's, you get an easily remembered pattern around every
note:

LNT (1/2 step) 1 (1 step) UNT
LNT (1/2 step) 3 (1/2 step) UNT
LNT (1/2 step) 5 (1 step) UNT

You can run some "encirclement" patterns around the CTs:

UNT-LNT-CT
LNT-UNT-CT
UNT-CT-LNT-CT
LNT-CT-UNT-CT ...

Additionally you can use the UNT and/or LNT as a passing tone from 1 CT to another.

It's a pretty easy way to get some non-diatonic notes into your solos and sound
good. You wouldn't want to do this all the time, just throw it in every now and
then.
#8
Quote by edg
The LNT is simple -- it's ALWAYS a chromatic, half-step down from the CT.
The UNT is ALWAYS the next higher diatonic note -- might be a whole or half step.
It also works well if both Neighbour Tones are diatonic i.e. the LNT might be a whole or half step.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#10
Take in all the advice above, especially with regard to learning a bit more theory to explore som possibilities of the scales. Here is something you can mess around with in the mean time though. Make a simple chord progression and then create some kind of theme, or repeating lead line over it (don't necessarily use a set scale to do this), this is the part where i let my ears do the thinking, then once I have something I really like the sound of, I look and see what scale it might be and build on my original idea. Then for solo's i pick a scale/scales first in improv in them until I'm happy with what I have. Where i'm at is making my chord progressions more interesting, i'm stuck at the minute making and endless supply of repeatitive progressions.

Edit: didn't realise this thread was like 2 months old, meh w/e
#12
Quote by Metal Society
Practice What U Want To Do And That Will Help You Out Practice With A Metronome If U Want Accuracy It All Depends On The Style U Desire To Play In

English mother ****er! That was one whole sentence. Granted, you know about CAPITALS, but jeeez, punctuation maybe? So people can understand you.
#13
You should try writting music with those scales, and try phrasing good licks using those notes instead of just running up and down them.. i dont think i would have ever had the patience to continue learning theory if I didnt see the huge impact it made on my playing almost immidietly
#14
learn theory, learn scales and most importantly improvise!! don't just play up and down, it gets boring really fast.