#1
Is having no whammy Bar a down fall. I mean can you do the same stuff on either type of Guitar or does having a whammy bar really let you do things you can not do without one. I am trying to decide for my next Guitar.
#3
they can really add to solos in my opinion
but definitely not necessary. a bad guitarist with a whammy bar is still a bad guitarist
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#5
Don't forget that there are some advantages to not having a whammy bar. Without one not only do your strings generally stay in tune better, but you also have better sustain because your guitar doesn't have all that wood routed out on the inside.
#6
like said before if you want to whammy get one. it really is fun to hit some cool divebombs and things like that!
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#7
meh.

A guitar with a whammy bar will sound diffrent then a guitar without a whammy system. I prefer hardtail bridges because i like the tone and the sustain I get. I find those more useful then a whammy would be. Some people can play around with them and get awesome sounds, but I fare better by just putting in extra notes and using a bit of vibrato.

But I play jazz, so my opinion probably doesn't apply.
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#8
There are ups and down to each. With non locking tremolos, you have a large loss of sustain, and more unstable tuning. With a locking tremolo, you have the hassle of dealing with it's tension, and a huge coloration to your sound, but you can do anything on it and it will never go out of tune. With hardtail guitars, you get better sustain, and very good tuning stability, and easy maitenance/string changing.
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#9
Quote by frigginjerk
you need a whammy bar to achieve the whammy bar effect. there are some pedals that emulate it, but none do it perfectly. so yeah... if you want to wham, you need a whammy bar.

I though you need short shorts to "Wham" I personally like fixed bridges.
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idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

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#10
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#11
eh... sustain and tuning really depend on the guitar, whether or not it has a tremolo. My strat has plenty of sustain and I rarely have to tune it. However, if you really don't think you need a tremolo, get a hardtail. I play a lot of jazz as well and I find I don't use the whammy much.
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#12
I have a guitar with a trem, and I find all I ever use it for is just mucking around. So my next guitar won't have one.
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#13
Not really, you can get some nice effects with it, but you're mostly going to be focusing on playing the guitar, not the whammy bar.

I do prefer the option of making cool sounds and fills for a bar or so, I prefer Floyd Roses, but I don't really use the whammy bar that much.
#16
Quote by schoenstrat
eh... sustain and tuning really depend on the guitar, whether or not it has a tremolo. My strat has plenty of sustain and I rarely have to tune it. However, if you really don't think you need a tremolo, get a hardtail. I play a lot of jazz as well and I find I don't use the whammy much.

I'm not saying a guitar with a tremolo will have crap sustain, but if a guitar has a big hole cut into the back of it, it will not sustain as much as it would with no hole.
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#17
As others have said- ups and downs to both. I prefer the simplicity, tone, sustain, and reliability of a fixed bridge. You literally can't go wrong with a fixed bridge. What no-one has mentioned though, that your budget should also effect your decision on whether to get a tremolo or not. Tremeolos on mid-range guitars and below are usually completely useless. They're crap, go out of tune a lot, and wear out pretty quickly. I played on a £300 ($600) Ibanez RG the other day. The tremolo system on that guitar was double-locking, and mild vibrato put it out of tune lol! This is a double-locking trem we're talking about.

So yeah, I would only get a trem if I was spending a lot of money on a professional guitar. If you're getting a cheaper one, then just don't bother. Get a fixed bridge, you'll save yourself so much hassle.
#18
Quote by Horlicks
You can whammy, without a whammy bar.

#19
Quote by Martin Scott
As others have said- ups and downs to both. I prefer the simplicity, tone, sustain, and reliability of a fixed bridge. You literally can't go wrong with a fixed bridge. What no-one has mentioned though, that your budget should also effect your decision on whether to get a tremolo or not. Tremeolos on mid-range guitars and below are usually completely useless. They're crap, go out of tune a lot, and wear out pretty quickly. I played on a £300 ($600) Ibanez RG the other day. The tremolo system on that guitar was double-locking, and mild vibrato put it out of tune lol! This is a double-locking trem we're talking about.

So yeah, I would only get a trem if I was spending a lot of money on a professional guitar. If you're getting a cheaper one, then just don't bother. Get a fixed bridge, you'll save yourself so much hassle.



what he said, also i found the novelty of the Floyd on my RR3 wore out after about a week, now its just a pain in the arse
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#20
Quote by Martin Scott
As others have said- ups and downs to both. I prefer the simplicity, tone, sustain, and reliability of a fixed bridge. You literally can't go wrong with a fixed bridge. What no-one has mentioned though, that your budget should also effect your decision on whether to get a tremolo or not. Tremeolos on mid-range guitars and below are usually completely useless. They're crap, go out of tune a lot, and wear out pretty quickly. I played on a £300 ($600) Ibanez RG the other day. The tremolo system on that guitar was double-locking, and mild vibrato put it out of tune lol! This is a double-locking trem we're talking about.

So yeah, I would only get a trem if I was spending a lot of money on a professional guitar. If you're getting a cheaper one, then just don't bother. Get a fixed bridge, you'll save yourself so much hassle.


If it's not set up right or the strings are stretched enough thats going to happen. I wouldn't blame the trem in that case, just a poor setup.

I have a licensed Floyd Rose on my guitar and new it would of been less than that Ibanez. After I change strings I really need to bend, stretch and abuse them a bit, but once thats all done that thing stays in tune perfectly. When I first got it, it took me close to an hour to change strings and figure this all out. Now I'm done in 15-20 minutes. Still longer than a hard tail but I have fun with the bar and can't imagine having a guitar w/o one. But to each his own.

I'm also thinking about getting a tremol-no for it. I do dives only so having that will help tuning even more and allow me to do drop tunings w/o having to reset the bridge.
#21
^ You would say that, though. Licenced Floyd Roses are commonly agreed to be utter crap. That's not the only LFR I've played, I've played many of them, and they've all been crap. The RG I said about was just one example. And that particular RG was in a shop, and was set up. LFRs are just crap, cast from crappy pot metal. The only good LFRs are Ibanez' expensive, professional-grade ones, which are on a par/better than the Original Floyd Rose. The cheap ones are just gimmicky useless toys they put on cheap guitars so that they appeal to little metal heads. I maintain- if you're shooting in the low-end to mid-range section, just get a fixed bridge. You'll regret getting a cheap Licenced Floyd Rose.
#24
It's up to you.

Ask yourself, will I ever use the whammy bar?

Floyd Roses aren't that difficult to restring, it just takes time and some practice. Now, having them set up is a real pain. But once they're set up, they work great. If you can deal with that, then you have all the whammy effects at your disposal.

I personally prefer not to have one. I find it uncomfortable when palm muting, and I have trouble with pinch harmonics on floyd-equipped guitars, for some reason, but that's just me. Many people find it otherwise.

I don't play any songs that require a whammy bar, anyway.
#25
[quote="'[autoclave"]']Don't forget that there are some advantages to not having a whammy bar. Without one not only do your strings generally stay in tune better, but you also have better sustain because your guitar doesn't have all that wood routed out on the inside.
routing a hole for the floating bridge affects sustain at microscopic level, if not insignificant.
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#26
Quote by necrophilic
routing a hole for the floating bridge affects sustain at microscopic level, if not insignificant.

What about mass and direct transition of the vibrations of the strings into the body?

Massive bodies, tune-o-matic bridges, through-body stringing, or well anchored tailpieces and tight neck joints all affect sustain (see: Gibson Les Paul, PRS)
#27
Quote by sashki
What about mass and direct transition of the vibrations of the strings into the body?

Massive bodies, tune-o-matic bridges, through-body stringing, or well anchored tailpieces and tight neck joints all affect sustain (see: Gibson Les Paul, PRS)

mass loss at the bridge is not the culprit for poor sustain.
the amount of wood routed out from the body to install a floating trem is considered "insignificant".
i'm not commenting on any other thing here.
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#28
Quote by Martin Scott
^ You would say that, though. Licenced Floyd Roses are commonly agreed to be utter crap. That's not the only LFR I've played, I've played many of them, and they've all been crap. The RG I said about was just one example. And that particular RG was in a shop, and was set up. LFRs are just crap, cast from crappy pot metal. The only good LFRs are Ibanez' expensive, professional-grade ones, which are on a par/better than the Original Floyd Rose. The cheap ones are just gimmicky useless toys they put on cheap guitars so that they appeal to little metal heads. I maintain- if you're shooting in the low-end to mid-range section, just get a fixed bridge. You'll regret getting a cheap Licenced Floyd Rose.


I was just sharing my experience and maybe I just got lucky with mine.

It just cements the point to play the guitar first to see if it meets your expectations. Obviously not all guitars are created equal.
#29
Quote by Martin Scott
^ You would say that, though. Licenced Floyd Roses are commonly agreed to be utter crap. That's not the only LFR I've played, I've played many of them, and they've all been crap. The RG I said about was just one example. And that particular RG was in a shop, and was set up. LFRs are just crap, cast from crappy pot metal. The only good LFRs are Ibanez' expensive, professional-grade ones, which are on a par/better than the Original Floyd Rose. The cheap ones are just gimmicky useless toys they put on cheap guitars so that they appeal to little metal heads. I maintain- if you're shooting in the low-end to mid-range section, just get a fixed bridge. You'll regret getting a cheap Licenced Floyd Rose.

Some are very good. And some suck. If you buy an LFR, get one that you KNOW is made of steel, preferably hardened steel.
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#30
Quote by mrbungle50221
what he said, also i found the novelty of the Floyd on my RR3 wore out after about a week, now its just a pain in the arse



I have a RR3. i have had it for about 3 months now and the Floyd Rose is fine.
#31
Depends on what you play. My first guitar had a tremolo arm, and it went to waste because I mostly play classic rock and blues. My second guitar was an SG copy with a hardtail bridge and my current is a Fender Tele with a fixed. I've never felt the need for a tremolo system. However, if the style of music you play utilizes divebombs, and crazy vibratos you can only achieve with a tremolo, by all means, go for it.
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