#1
Anyone know what this is?

I was going through the WTLT thread and saw a post by Lord Casmin about the HW and WH scales and he brought that up.


Edit: Here's his post

Quote by casualty01


H/W diminished:

inherently, according to interval naming principles, the b3 functions as a #2 and the b5 functions as a #4 and all that, and yes, the underlying chord according to all the rules of the harmonic order of strengths is indeed a Dom7 (In the H/W). if you look at the full chord, you have a G7 b9/#9/#11 ... but it'll usually be just written as G7b9 (occasionally as G7#9, but that's usually reserved for the Alt scale)


W/H diminished:

here, we have a full diminished 7th chord as our parent chord. simple. use over dim7th chords


the thing to pay attention to is that one W/H is another H/W. for example G# HW = A WH and vice versa. ergo, there's only 3 of each scale when you factor in the enharmonic equivalants.

anyways, maybe you already knew all that, but regardless, the answer to your question about "why is it called a diminished scale" is because of the symetrical quality that the scales have because they're both made from two separate dim 7th arpeggios.

Cas-
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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Last edited by metal4all at Jul 9, 2008,
#2
WH or HW = Whole Step/Half Step or Half Step/Whole step and it is a symetrical sequence from jazz theory. Do a google search and there are plenty of in depth articles about it.
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Last edited by shredder.cheese at Jul 9, 2008,
#3
90% of the threads here could be solved by a google search. Especially the ones that pop up every day like "how do i find the key of a song". I wanted to know what the intelligent people here had to say. Thanks though.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#4
In a nut shell it is basically a jazz scale formula but can be applied by any genre of music.
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my gear:
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Quote by uncboy19
man all guitars are female. if they werent you couldn't make sweet love to them with your fingers. ok somebody better quote that ****. thats like quantum guitar **** rite there.
#5
Sorry, i'm not talking about the WH and HW scales, i get what those are (not super in depth like cas but enough for me). I was wondering what this "harmonic order of strengths" thing is that he was referring to when talking about the scales.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#7
I am assuming there was some piece of music that was being referenced in that original thread and some debate over the function of the #2nd and the b5 (which the poster points out as acting as a #4th). The Harmonic Order of Strength is just a mathematical way of showing what the logical make up of (in this case) the chord was, which was Dom7. While the tonal variations of the #2nd and #4th could be looked at one way (in it's relationship to the piece), the chord itself was a Dom7th based on it's harmonic makeup or HW sequence (or in other words the Harmonic Order - the strengths part is just an add on and didn't really need to be tacked on the end of Harmonic Order but it does emphasize the point). It is all really based on the relationship of notes and their relevance to the diatonic scale for the most part but with the addition of whole tones mixed in.
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my gear:
oh wait, no one cares

Quote by uncboy19
man all guitars are female. if they werent you couldn't make sweet love to them with your fingers. ok somebody better quote that ****. thats like quantum guitar **** rite there.
#9
Thanks guys
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#10
He's referring to the fact that in a C HW diminished scale, the notes enharmonic to C, E, G, and Bb will function as a dominant 7th chord despite technically not being the root, 3rd, 5th, and minor 7th of the scale. Plus all the extensions for the rest of the degrees in the scale.