#1
I've been pondering which I should get. Can you guys help me decide one of the two? and recommend one in the 300-400 price range?

I've tried both, so far I don't know what to decide.
List possible pros and cons plz.

Thanks.

Edit: Decided on Nylon, but still need suggestions on what guitar/model I should get.
Quote by rastaman12
What do people usually do after they **** their sisters?
Last edited by Lucky#Slevin at Jul 9, 2008,
#2
Steel-Tougher to play
Nylon-Easier

They are 2 different guitars though.
Different sounds and the like. Saying they're the same is like saying "Whisky and lager are the same thing".

Get what suits you.
#3
I personally prefer steel strings, but I largely use a pick. Nylon is better for finger picking, and is less painful first starting out (not as rough on your fingers). If you decide to go with steel, the Ibanez exotic wood series is really diverse, and all of the guitars from that series that I've played sounded great. They might actually might make a nylon version too, I'm not sure. Happy hunting
Quote by Teh Traineez0rz
yeah was weird cause she liked us both but she loved him and for some reason she let me know beforehand.

i just wanted her poon and she wanted me to have her poon.

so i had myself some poon.
#4
well, do you like a softer sound or a In your face sound? Nylon is very subdued. Steel is right in there. Granted you can go softer with th steel by strumming near the fretboard. But Nylon will always have a more relaxed sound.
#5
Quote by _Tim_
Steel-Tougher to play
Nylon-Easier




Not really, it depends on what's being played. I know I couldn't finger pick my way out of a paper bag. Really depends on the strengths of the player.
Quote by Teh Traineez0rz
yeah was weird cause she liked us both but she loved him and for some reason she let me know beforehand.

i just wanted her poon and she wanted me to have her poon.

so i had myself some poon.
#6
well like, for me, it depends on the kind of music u play. I prefer acoustics cause bends, hammers, and pulls sound more than classicals. And because I play some power ballads acoustic is more useful. A good acoustic guitar may be an Epi, I've read some good reviews in some guitars. But, if you play like, I dont know some instrumentals nylons are great although I play Endless Love by Lionel Richie and sounds great with steel.

wow, thats a large comment :P
#7
If I go Classical I will probably be learning some flamenco, but I really and not looking forward to growing my nails. I'm fond of playing "ambient" type songs, but sometime in the future I would like to be the guy that plays the guitar @ campfire songs =) I'm trying to pick up singing as well, so that's a plus for steel, I have the feeling that Nylon+singing will sound a bit dull. Any other suggestions on the guitars? could you guys recommend particular models?

Thanks.
Quote by rastaman12
What do people usually do after they **** their sisters?
#8
if you can play classical or want to play classical/flamenco get a nylon string if you want to play with a pick or fingerstyle like andy mckee, antoine dufour get a steel string i have both but it is very difficult to play fingerstyle on an acoustic i prefer to play it on the nylon string so basically if you want to play fingerstyle classical/flamenco id get the nylon string and plus once you can play the classical well people are amazed classical guitar is a dying art it be great if people would keep it alive
#9
Quote by Lucky#Slevin
If I go Classical I will probably be learning some flamenco, but I really and not looking forward to growing my nails. I'm fond of playing "ambient" type songs, but sometime in the future I would like to be the guy that plays the guitar @ campfire songs =) I'm trying to pick up singing as well, so that's a plus for steel, I have the feeling that Nylon+singing will sound a bit dull. Any other suggestions on the guitars? could you guys recommend particular models?

Thanks.

If you're wanting to do campfire songs, stell string is the way to go. And any of the Ibanez acoustic's are good. I have an EW zebrawood, and it looks and sounds amazing
Quote by Teh Traineez0rz
yeah was weird cause she liked us both but she loved him and for some reason she let me know beforehand.

i just wanted her poon and she wanted me to have her poon.

so i had myself some poon.
#10
steel string is the way to go if you want to do campfire songs. both have it's merits, it really depends on the kind of songs you like
#11
I guess I'll go Nylon for now, and buy an AC-2 for my electric for now.
Any good ones you guys recommend? Don't really know much. I would prefer one with electronics on it, but doesn't matter, just want a beautiful sound around 400ish dollars.
What wood should I look for etc...
Thanks.
Quote by rastaman12
What do people usually do after they **** their sisters?
#12
Quote by Lucky#Slevin
I guess I'll go Nylon for now, and buy an AC-2 for my electric for now.
Any good ones you guys recommend? Don't really know much. I would prefer one with electronics on it, but doesn't matter, just want a beautiful sound around 400ish dollars.
What wood should I look for etc...
Thanks.


They're really completely different instruments. In a lot of respects I feel like a steel-string acoustic has more in common with some electrics than it does with a nylon string guitar.

If you want to play loud chords with a pick the choice is easy- get a steel string guitar. If you want to play classical or flamenco with your fingers, the choice is also easy- get a decent nylon string guitar. If you want to do something in-between it is a bit trickier, and I'd advise you to listen to both, a lot, as they really do sound very different. I will say that I do not like the sound of a pick on nylon strings, at all, though other people feel differently about that. Still, I would say that if you want to play primarily with a pick you should get a steel string.

Whatever you do, don't buy a nylon string guitar with a laminated top. The extra few dollars you pay for a solid top will be worth it. If you decide to get a nylon string I'd look at the low end Pavane guitars. They're made by the same workshops in Spain that make most of the decent student instruments, but they are hand-picked and set up by a good American luthier.

EDIT: You almost certainly want a solid cedar top. For $400.00 you will get laminated sides and back, and you'll like it - the top is the most important part anyway. I would normally tell you not to buy a guitar without playing it, but if you don't play you won't be able to assess guitars accurately. I would take a look at http://www.pavanguitars.com/models.html The least expensive one is $425.00. That is a bit (~$50.00-75.00) more than you might pay for the same guitar (maybe made by the same people, even) under a different label, but you are paying to have a luthier inspect it and set it up. It's worth it if you have no experience with this kind of guitar.

If you want the lower price I would recommend Cordoba's low end solid tops- I've seen three or four of their student instruments and all of them were playable and had nice tone for the price range.
Last edited by mezzopiano at Jul 10, 2008,
#13
Thanks Mez. Any other guitars that would be around 300-400 USED?
Thanks again.
Quote by rastaman12
What do people usually do after they **** their sisters?
#14
Well to bring the original topic up again: what if you want to play both styles? Or at least a little bit of classical/fingerpicking with regular chord strumming/campfire songs? I'm leaning towards nylon because it seems easier to do both styles on that (i.e. to strum chords etc.) than it would be for a steel-string (classical/flamenco finger-picking). What do you guys think?
#15
Quote by Lucky#Slevin
Thanks Mez. Any other guitars that would be around 300-400 USED?
Thanks again.


The same basic principles apply to used nylon string instruments. Look for something made in Spain, and make sure it has a solid top, preferably cedar in that price range. Also, if you don't play I'd suggest that you find someone who does, if you can, to help you look at instruments. Even new instruments are often messed up in subtle ways- with used instruments all bets are off. Make sure that the guitar has decent intonation- I bought my frst guitar before I knew how to play, and it had terrible intonation. It was very frustrating.

The name isn't the important thing here though- a lot of brands buy the same Spanish-made student instruments and put their name on them. You want to try as many as you can and find the one that plays well and has good tone. But, as I said, as far as I can tell from a small sample Cordoba at least has decent quality control.
#17
Quote by ray_von
I know someone who strings the first 3 nylon and the bottom 3 steel.


Does he have a 12 string with 6 nylon and 6 steel strings?

Is "he" really just "you" and you're ashamed? It's ok. You can admit it

As for the OP, the styles you describing seem like you'd be better suited to steel string. If you want to play simple songs and have your friends sing along, you want steel string all the way.

Nylon is beautiful, but it's a distinct sound and if you grab a pick and try to play some jack johnson for your friends you're not going to like it.

Best of luck either way. Lots of good advice here so far.

-J
#18
Quote by Nims

Nylon is beautiful, but it's a distinct sound and if you grab a pick and try to play some jack johnson for your friends you're not going to like it.


QFT. If you want a guitar to whack some chords out on, get a steel string (and I say this against my prejudices, as I am very much a nylon string player). Classical and Flamenco guitars are extremely rewarding guitars to play, but they're the most demanding guitars, IMHO. I wouldn't get one unless you are planning to spend a fair bit of time learning to play it.

EDIT: and I sure hope that the "friend" is using a steel string guitar for his experiment. Cause steel strings will rip the bridge right off a nylon string guitar.
#19
Quote by FireStarter15
Well to bring the original topic up again: what if you want to play both styles? Or at least a little bit of classical/fingerpicking with regular chord strumming/campfire songs? I'm leaning towards nylon because it seems easier to do both styles on that (i.e. to strum chords etc.) than it would be for a steel-string (classical/flamenco finger-picking). What do you guys think?
I think the opposite. I can play fingerstyle on steel just fine, and the fact that the strings are further apart and the neck is bigger on nylon could pose a chording problem.
#20
Quote by Matt Chavie
I think the opposite. I can play fingerstyle on steel just fine, and the fact that the strings are further apart and the neck is bigger on nylon could pose a chording problem.



Hmm- I think the classical guitar really is more versatile if you play it well. But it's far less versatile if you play casually. For instance, the rasgeao is an extraordinarily versatile strumming technique, but it takes some time to get it sounding good, and more years than I have left to master. But you can pick up a pick and strum chords on a steel string pretty quick.

Along the same lines, the classical guitar can produce a wider variety of tones than any other guitar, if you don't allow electric guitarists to switch their signal chain around while playing. But it is hard to learn to get all those sounds- I'm still blown away when I see film of Segovia demonstrating the degree to which he can vary his tone. But since that is hard, it is not of much use to the casual guitarist.

I think I will stand by what I said- the Spanish guitar is very rewarding if you are willing to really work at playing it, but it is not as good as the steel-string for a casual guitarist.
#21
Quote by mezzopiano
Hmm- I think the classical guitar really is more versatile if you play it well. But it's far less versatile if you play casually. For instance, the rasgeao is an extraordinarily versatile strumming technique, but it takes some time to get it sounding good, and more years than I have left to master. But you can pick up a pick and strum chords on a steel string pretty quick.

Along the same lines, the classical guitar can produce a wider variety of tones than any other guitar, if you don't allow electric guitarists to switch their signal chain around while playing. But it is hard to learn to get all those sounds- I'm still blown away when I see film of Segovia demonstrating the degree to which he can vary his tone. But since that is hard, it is not of much use to the casual guitarist.

I think I will stand by what I said- the Spanish guitar is very rewarding if you are willing to really work at playing it, but it is not as good as the steel-string for a casual guitarist.


I think I didn't get my opinion in there, I love nylon strings. I just see as a beginner it being harder to play a nylon compared to a steel due to bigger neck/string distant. initially the claw was the hardest thing for me and I can't imagine having to spread my hand out further.
#22
Ok firstly, ignore all that crap about steel strings being too tough for beginners, that's just bull****. And do anyone who does think they are too hard to learn on, grow some nuts.

Secondly, each instrument has its own unique sound and applications.
Basically, they are:
Steel string - Rock, pop, folk, campfire, pretty much anything in modern music, classic rock

Nylon - Classical, flamenco, rarely used in modern music (but still sometimes).

Also, anyone is capable fingerpicking on a steel string. Sure nylon strings are spaced further apart, but they also have higher action, and the fret spaces are much larger.

So just make your decision on what you want to play.
PPPPPPPOSTFINDER
#24
Quote by mezzopiano
Hmm- I think the classical guitar really is more versatile if you play it well. But it's far less versatile if you play casually. For instance, the rasgeao is an extraordinarily versatile strumming technique, but it takes some time to get it sounding good, and more years than I have left to master. But you can pick up a pick and strum chords on a steel string pretty quick.

Along the same lines, the classical guitar can produce a wider variety of tones than any other guitar, if you don't allow electric guitarists to switch their signal chain around while playing. But it is hard to learn to get all those sounds- I'm still blown away when I see film of Segovia demonstrating the degree to which he can vary his tone. But since that is hard, it is not of much use to the casual guitarist.

I think I will stand by what I said- the Spanish guitar is very rewarding if you are willing to really work at playing it, but it is not as good as the steel-string for a casual guitarist.


I just bought an Esteve yesterday. Really looking forward to becoming intimate with it.
#25
Quote by breadstick
Ok firstly, ignore all that crap about steel strings being too tough for beginners, that's just bull****. And do anyone who does think they are too hard to learn on, grow some nuts.

Secondly, each instrument has its own unique sound and applications.
Basically, they are:
Steel string - Rock, pop, folk, campfire, pretty much anything in modern music, classic rock

Nylon - Classical, flamenco, rarely used in modern music (but still sometimes).

Also, anyone is capable fingerpicking on a steel string. Sure nylon strings are spaced further apart, but they also have higher action, and the fret spaces are much larger.

So just make your decision on what you want to play.


i agree with what he said. base your decision on what kind of songs you want to play. and most importantly, whatever you end up buying, have fun with it!
#26
Well to clear a few things up...

I'm not actually a beginner, and I've been playing for about 4 years now. I currently have a really low-quality steel string acoustic that I'm looking to replace with a nice acoustic-electric (most likely a Cordoba classical, or Breedlove steel-string acoustic). I'm classically trained on other stringed instruments (violin, bass) so classical music does appeal to me and I would like to develop my classical/flamenco playing on guitar as well. And I do listen to and play most of the genres mentioned for steel-string.

As for neck size, I do have relatively large hands and have found classical necks to not be a problem. I've even found fretting chords to be a bit easier on classical since I tend to unintentionally mute strings when fingering my steel-string.

And I do understand each type of guitar has its own specific applications for music. But since I probably plan on doing both and there is no hybrid steel/nylon-string guitar yet, my question is that would a steel- or nylon-string guitar be better suited for that middle ground?
#27
Different colours kiddies, different colours.


Pretty much everything has been said, but I have two more things.

1. Don't get an Ibanez steel. Sounds like elastic bands on a plank of polifybersomething.

2. PLAY THE DAMN THINGS. Go to a shop, pick up steel, strum and listen. Do the same with LOTS of guitars. You'll find one that sounds nice.


G'luck.
#28
Thanks for the tips guys.
How does this one look. I'm deciding to go cheapo first and get a better one later on, or maybe a steel one. It got pretty good reviews @ Harmony Central...

Ibanez GA6CE
Quote by rastaman12
What do people usually do after they **** their sisters?
#29
Don't get that. If you want a cheap classical guitar, you're better off with a Yamaha. You won't be needing the electronics either, classical guitars sound like **** if they plugged in unless you're really good at equalizing.
#30
Hm... mk. How bout the yamaha c-40?
I was kinda tempted to get that other one since it had a hardcase.
Quote by rastaman12
What do people usually do after they **** their sisters?