#1
A little Background. (skip this is you want) I've always really sucked at music, However in High School I took Two Years of Piano, and bore through it. I can't even clap my hands to a beat at church. I certainly can't sing in tune. And I have trouble telling how far apart notes are when I hear them.

One thing that discouraged me from Music when I tried Piano was reading sheet music. It's just freaking hard, it's like another language, and I'm not good at those either. I've recently started going through Hal Leonards begginer guitar book volume I. And once again it's sheet music based. I am struggling through it, and I just need help making the sheet music make more sense. It's a little easier on the guitar at first becuase it is all in the Treble Clef, no bass clef. So I have EGBDF (every good boy does fine) and FACE. But I consistently have to count my way up to each note.

So I look at a note on the page and count it out, Every Good Boy DOES. Then I look at my Guitar and Count Again Every Absent DOG and then I know what to hit.

How do I make it more knowledge and less method and just see a note on the sheet music and think "that is a D" and know to play the 4th string on the guitar?

It's just discouraging and I don't wanna end up an epic failure.
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#2
Well, the more you play "sheet music" or standard musical notation, the quicker you'll be able to pick it up. To be honest, if after "Two Years of Piano" you still couldn't pick up which notes were which, it would probably be best to stick to tabs, though your description of your musical shortcomings make me think that perhaps it's better to stick to being the roadie.
If don't have a sense of rhythm, are tone deaf and are notation-dyslexic, the only thing I can recommend is not to play music. Sorry.
#4
If it were me, I would do flash cards. Get a deck of blank flash cards, draw a music bar on it, draw notes on them with the names on the back and start to memorise them. The Hal Lenard method is good, learning note sequences one string at a time.
#5
Practice, practice, practice.

(p.s. try to avoid using open strings when sight reading pieces of music.)
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#6
Quote by rhettro
If it were me, I would do flash cards. Get a deck of blank flash cards, draw a music bar on it, draw notes on them with the names on the back and start to memorise them. The Hal Lenard method is good, learning note sequences one string at a time.


Funny you come up with that. I did the same thing and within a few hours I was able to recognize all the notes at one glance. Now I can read music but I still can't readily play from sheet. That once again comes down to the reply given to almost every question asked in this forum; practice, practice, practice
#7
Quote by YourVillian
Well, the more you play "sheet music" or standard musical notation, the quicker you'll be able to pick it up. To be honest, if after "Two Years of Piano" you still couldn't pick up which notes were which, it would probably be best to stick to tabs, though your description of your musical shortcomings make me think that perhaps it's better to stick to being the roadie.
If don't have a sense of rhythm, are tone deaf and are notation-dyslexic, the only thing I can recommend is not to play music. Sorry.


Thanks for your honesty and trust me, I don’t plan on torturing people with countless pathetic youtube videos. This is really just for my own improvement.

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Speaking of pwnership, that’s exactly what I said.

Quote by rhettro
If it were me, I would do flash cards. Get a deck of blank flash cards, draw a music bar on it, draw notes on them with the names on the back and start to memorise them. The Hal Lenard method is good, learning note sequences one string at a time.


Thanks, I’ll try that!

Quote by kevinm4435
Practice, practice, practice.

(p.s. try to avoid using open strings when sight reading pieces of music.)


You mean instead of playing the open A string, to just play an A on the 5th fret of the E string?
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#8
It took me about 2ish years of reading music to really be able to do it fluently, just looking at it and almost playing the piece perfectly (the notes, not the rhythm)
#9
Quote by Guitarfreak777
It took me about 2ish years of reading music to really be able to do it fluently, just looking at it and almost playing the piece perfectly (the notes, not the rhythm)



do you do it pretty frequently??? I've been practicing about 1/2 hour per day.
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#10
you just have to practice. i have been playing piano for 7 years now (im about 16) and reading sheet music is like reading a book. just through playing a lot and such i don't have to figure out the note. when i see the shape of a certain note or chord i can know exactly where to put my fingers. so my advice, just practice and don't give up.
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#11
I learnt to read music using a book my piano teacher gave me. First, it teaches you where Middle C is and a couple of notes surrounding it (all in the treble clef). Then it gradually expands to all the notes on the treble clef without any leger lines. And finally, all of that is repeated for the bass clef. I think this is the best way to learn how to read music.

And since guitar revolves around the treble clef only, it will be easier than the piano.
#12
to recognize it and When I just started playing bass to learn sheet music I read the note 2 times the first time the second time to reinforce it.
#13
tabs
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#14
Quote by 24fretsftw
tabs


I'm working on them too =þ


Guys, I know it's practice, practice, practice, and I don't blame anyone for re-iterating that. Becuase I know some people want to be Carlos Santana over night.

But I'm not like that, just looking for some helpful tips. The Index Cards Idea I think it's extremely helpful! Just making them has helped engrain them in my head. I made a set of 17. One for each Note between Low E and the first G on the high E string. After making them I can get them all, with a lot less counting, but I'm not 'quick' so I'll keep practicing.

I think I'm going to draw the Tabs of the same note on the Back of Each Card so I can learn that better too. Thanks guys.
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#15
Quote by 4jacks
But I'm not like that, just looking for some helpful tips. The Index Cards Idea I think it's extremely helpful!


If that helps, great. But I've found though that knowing which notes are which on the staff is not the big problem- if you read through simple melodies for a while you'll never ever forget that. The tricky part is actually sight-reading, in time. I'm definitely still working on this. The best hints I have for that are:

1) get a book of melodic rhythm studies and get them really solid. You don't want to have to think about how to count a complex rhythmic figure while you're reading.

2) read ahead. You should be mentally preparing the next measure while you're playing the current one.

3) Practice reading stuff slowly, but don't stop if you make a mistake- just keep reading.

One thing that helped me reading classical stuff was to learn pieces by repeatedly reading through them at really slow tempos, until I had pretty much memorized them, before going to work on tuning them measure by measure.
#16
Quote by 4jacks
I'm working on them too =þ


Guys, I know it's practice, practice, practice, and I don't blame anyone for re-iterating that. Becuase I know some people want to be Carlos Santana over night.

But I'm not like that, just looking for some helpful tips. The Index Cards Idea I think it's extremely helpful! Just making them has helped engrain them in my head. I made a set of 17. One for each Note between Low E and the first G on the high E string. After making them I can get them all, with a lot less counting, but I'm not 'quick' so I'll keep practicing.

I think I'm going to draw the Tabs of the same note on the Back of Each Card so I can learn that better too. Thanks guys.



If -making- the cards helped you, than perhaps your learning style involves writing. While you can't only learn by writing, if you incorporate it you just may find a breakthrough.

I know that I have always excelled in language, but only because if I write a word and it's translation once or twice, I have it down forever. You may have a similar learning style. It's worth a try.

Get a good small-medium sized piece that is rather easy and grab a few pieces of blank music paper. Copy each note exactly onto the paper, and then write above or below it it's name and the fingering to play it. If the song has a lot of repeated notes you will soon start seeing a note and remembering that you already wrote that one down. Soon after you will remember *what* you wrote. And that is memorization.

This won't solve all of your problems, and it is tedious, but you sound serious and I think you might get somewhere using this method. Make sure every time you write down a note you play it 2-3 times on your guitar. As you do more and more of these try not to look up what the notes are at all. Let them come to you. It's like melodic flash cards.
#17
http://www.francoisbrisson.com/fretboardwarrior//fretboard/fretboard.html

That can help you some too. Try it a few times and you will see why it can help. By being able to look at the fret and string is being played then able to tell what note it is might be able to help you some.

Also, I believe earlier you were talking about not being able to tell the distance for the notes or what not(intervals) then this may help:

http://www.good-ear.com/servlet/EarTrainer?chap=0&menu=0

You may need to go to the Beginner/simple intervals part but it is a good site for other things also.

Oh and I finally found the link in my huge selection of book marks:

http://musictheory.net/trainers/html/id82_en.html

This may help you find out what note to play also. I have other things also, if I can find them, any specifics you want help on(other then the ones given already)?

Also, sorry for some of this coming out wrong and confusing...I can't think right now for some reason.
#18
Quote by Nacho Cheese!
http://www.francoisbrisson.com/fretboardwarrior//fretboard/fretboard.html

That can help you some too. Try it a few times and you will see why it can help. By being able to look at the fret and string is being played then able to tell what note it is might be able to help you some.

Also, I believe earlier you were talking about not being able to tell the distance for the notes or what not(intervals) then this may help:

http://www.good-ear.com/servlet/EarTrainer?chap=0&menu=0

You may need to go to the Beginner/simple intervals part but it is a good site for other things also.

Oh and I finally found the link in my huge selection of book marks:

http://musictheory.net/trainers/html/id82_en.html

This may help you find out what note to play also. I have other things also, if I can find them, any specifics you want help on(other then the ones given already)?

Also, sorry for some of this coming out wrong and confusing...I can't think right now for some reason.



That Musictheory.net website you linked to is the greatest site! It actually takes care of the FretBoard game and the Ear Trainer All on that site, and IMO it's a better layout.

with the Fretboard Game you can choose how many frets you want to work with. In my case I'm working with 3, becuase that is what is in my Hal Leonard book so far. And with the Ear Trainer on Musictheory.net you can choose what steps it will play.

I REALLY SUCK at the ear trainer!!! I put it down so it only plays, either unison, half step, or whole step, and I still only get about 50 percent of them right.

The site also has a great set of lessons, Even my wife picked up a thing or two, and a great sheet music trainer also, you can set the range on that also.

Thank you very much Nacho, that is awesome!
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#19
Quote by 4jacks
That Musictheory.net website you linked to is the greatest site! It actually takes care of the FretBoard game and the Ear Trainer All on that site, and IMO it's a better layout.

with the Fretboard Game you can choose how many frets you want to work with. In my case I'm working with 3, becuase that is what is in my Hal Leonard book so far. And with the Ear Trainer on Musictheory.net you can choose what steps it will play.

I REALLY SUCK at the ear trainer!!! I put it down so it only plays, either unison, half step, or whole step, and I still only get about 50 percent of them right.

The site also has a great set of lessons, Even my wife picked up a thing or two, and a great sheet music trainer also, you can set the range on that also.

Thank you very much Nacho, that is awesome!


I'm glad to have helped you out.

I never searched that site much...maybe I should search it a wee bit more.
#20
you really just have to keep playing and looking at the music
trust me, when you do it long enough, you will be able to instantly recognize the note by looking at it
then you need to know where that corresponds on the fretboard

just keep going and dont get frustrated
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#21
Quote by Nacho Cheese!
I'm glad to have helped you out.


Seriously, If I were gay I'd marry you and have your babies. Best help ever

Quote by Nacho Cheese!

I never searched that site much...maybe I should search it a wee bit more.


It's really simple, I haven't gone through all the lessons yet, but all the "trainers" are really easy to use, and much nicer than other ones I've seen! It have more trainers that are a little too advanced for me right now, like keys and scales and stuff.
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#22
Quote by 4jacks
Seriously, If I were gay I'd marry you and have your babies. Best help ever




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