#1
how can i tell what string and fret to play on guitar from reading music notation not guitar tabs, i understand music notation and all the notes on it the 5 lines etc..
but how do i know what string to play the note and what octave.


and anyone knows a link to grade 5 theroy on the net please send it my way.
#2
Quote by 2mins2midnite
how can i tell what string and fret to play on guitar from reading music notation not guitar tabs, i understand music notation and all the notes on it the 5 lines etc..
but how do i know what string to play the note and what octave.


and anyone knows a link to grade 5 theroy on the net please send it my way.

It's optional, whatever works easiest for you.

Edit: If I remember right, in standard tuning, the low E is the high E on the bass clef.
#3
If I remember correctly...there is an average of 6.2 places to play any given note on a guitar.

Pick one and go with it.
More UltraMatic than you.
#4
It all depends on what key you're in; the key determines the position that you are going to play in, therefore determining which fret on which string a certain note is going to be on. Look through some beginner's/intermediate violin books, they should tell you all the positions you'll need.
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#5
Quote by firebreath07
Look through some beginner's/intermediate violin books, they should tell you all the positions you'll need.


??????
More UltraMatic than you.
#6
how would violin books help you in guitar playing? : /
the positions won't be the same, because the violin has a different tuning.

and as a reference, the G line in the treble clef equals an open G in your guitar.
#7
Quote by RCalisto
how would violin books help you in guitar playing? : /
the positions won't be the same, because the violin has a different tuning.

and as a reference, the G line in the treble clef equals an open G in your guitar.



That's not true... all stringed instruments are in the key of C. The tuning on a violin is G-D-A-E, all notes which can be found on open strings on a guitar.
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#8
Quote by firebreath07
That's not true... all stringed instruments are in the key of C. The tuning on a violin is G-D-A-E, all notes which can be found on open strings on a guitar.


Violinists don't commonly play open strings. The only time I've heard people using them is either a) practicing with their bow hand or b) for effect because it has sort of a harsher tone that breaks things up.

One of my favorite musicians is a violinist and I do incorporate some of her stuff messing around with solos, but violins and guitars and things that are quite easy on a violin can be quite difficult on a guitar and vice versa.

Learning what position to play from just comes from practice and experience. Even the way you play the exact same scale might change when ascending or descending because certain ways to grab a note can be easier one way or another. That's one of the reasons learning scales as dot patterns can be so bad, it can make some things very awkward to play.

Even then you may change things for the tonal effect, the same note on a different string can sound fairly different. Iommi is very particular about playing Paranoid from the 12th position, though a lot of people play it from the 7th (I think even Randy Rhoads played it from the 7th). I was working on a, bizarrely enough, violin piece and switched the key to keep using the open string because the difference in tone was more interesting than playing the whole thing from a fretted position.
#9
Quote by firebreath07
That's not true... all stringed instruments are in the key of C. The tuning on a violin is G-D-A-E, all notes which can be found on open strings on a guitar.


indeed, although in a mirrored order. so the positions can be completely different to play the same thing.
#10
My god, do you have any idea how many times this has been asked.

Ok, Middle C on guitar is located on the 3rd fret A string or 8th fret E string. Now, guitar is actually an octave below actual pitch notation so that means that if you play guitar's middle C, that's an octave lower than middle C on piano. You don't have to worry about that unless you're playing music for something other than guitar (then you would have to play an octave higher).

Open E string is 3 ledger lines and a space below the treble clef staff. Open A string is 2 ledger lines below. Open D string is a space below. Open G string is the second line (going up). Open B string is the middle (third) ledger line (going up). Open E string is the 4th space going up or one space below the top ledger line.

To add on, it doesn't really matter where you play those notes on the fretboard as long as you keep them in the same octave. e.g. 5th fret E string = open A string

The five lines is called a staff!!!! staff in plural is "staves". Learn it!!! lol, i'm picky.


p.s. if the music you are reading has "8va" (italian for "ottava alta" above it, that means to play it an octave higher. If it says, "8vb" (italian for "ottava bassa") that means to play it an octave lower. If you see "15ma", that means play it 2 octaves higher.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥