#1
I don't know if my band is just bad, or if it's amp placement/crappy basement acoustics. The problem is that when we practice, it sounds like a mess. I normally stand to the right of the drum, next to my amp, which points forwards like the drums. The other guitarist stands infront of the drummer with his amp pointed towards the right, in my direction. Is my band bad, or do I just need to find a better way to arrange the amps. (Suggestions)

Also, off topic, is it "bad" to have a 20 second drum solo right after the intro to a song? I personally like it there and think it makes the song stand out a little, but my uncle keeps making fun of us.
Guitars:
Epiphone Les Paul Special II [Heavily Modded]
Hand-Built Jem Copy
Rouge RA-100

Amps:
Crate VC-50
Epiphone Studio 10

Pedals:
DigiTech Bad Monkey
MXR 10 Band EQ
Boss Noise Suppressor
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff w/ Top Boost
#2
Work on your levels and whatnot - make sure that each amp is loud enough to be heard, but not so loud that they overpower everything else. Also make sure the tones don't interfere with one another and all that, and it made start sounding a bit more organized.

And if you like the way a song sounds, then keep it. You don't have to please anyone - make the music that you want to make.

Cheers.
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#3
Also, off topic, is it "bad" to have a 20 second drum solo right after the intro to a song?

Drum solo? *facepalm*

No, it's fine, as long as it fits there.

It's probably crappy basement acoustics. When I was in a band, we'd always have the amps pretty much facing the same way as the bass drum. Try that maybe?

Turn down your gain a little also, if you have it high? And some clean parts too, because then it will be blatantly obvious if you are just sloppy.
#4
well... it probbly is your band.. i mean you can put the drums in another room.. mabi your basement has 2 compartments?, if not then try standing away from the drums and put your amps opposite to the drums... this way the drummer will hear you.. and youll hear him.. your setting up as if you are on stage or somthing.. if this dosent help than its your band..
#5
I apologize for 20 second paint job. Here's pretty much how we have it now:


Is this how we should do it?:
Guitars:
Epiphone Les Paul Special II [Heavily Modded]
Hand-Built Jem Copy
Rouge RA-100

Amps:
Crate VC-50
Epiphone Studio 10

Pedals:
DigiTech Bad Monkey
MXR 10 Band EQ
Boss Noise Suppressor
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff w/ Top Boost
#6
Reverb can sometimes make things sound out of tune. Could that be a problem?
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#7
It's possible. We were planning on attempting to sound-proof the room over the summer, which would help with that.
Guitars:
Epiphone Les Paul Special II [Heavily Modded]
Hand-Built Jem Copy
Rouge RA-100

Amps:
Crate VC-50
Epiphone Studio 10

Pedals:
DigiTech Bad Monkey
MXR 10 Band EQ
Boss Noise Suppressor
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff w/ Top Boost
#8
work on the levels of your amps, and instead of 20 second drum solo after intro, do like a 4 bar drum break, then come back in with the guitars.
#9
Plus, are your basement walls cement? and the floor cement? Or is it a finished basement with a painted wall and carpeted floors? My band rehearses in my basement, and our acoustics sound good down there, because the part we play in, I have a hard wood floor and painted walls.
#10
Yep it's all cement. I think we're going to invest in sound-proofing foam and then start eating a bunch of eggs to improve the acoustics. That + pointing the amps towards the drummer and sitting like 15 feet away and directly infront of him should help.
Guitars:
Epiphone Les Paul Special II [Heavily Modded]
Hand-Built Jem Copy
Rouge RA-100

Amps:
Crate VC-50
Epiphone Studio 10

Pedals:
DigiTech Bad Monkey
MXR 10 Band EQ
Boss Noise Suppressor
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff w/ Top Boost
#11
Or, instead of worrying about soundproofing, get a PA, turn down your amps, mic them, and then do the sound balancing from the PA mixer.

That's how the pros do it live.
#12
My band plays in a cement basement. Try turning down. If you're all really loud it just sounds like a mess no matter what.
#13
I'm going to reiterate on what almost every post has said here: turn it down (that means the drummer too, don't let him tell you he can't play more quietly, that's BS). Not only will there be less echo and natural reverb in the closed space, but you can each focus on listening to each other instead of cranking your own amp up to cut through, thus making you much much tighter. Most people should take this advice not just when practicing, but on stage as well.

ALso, where's your bass player fellah?
#14
Quote by Nijyo
Or, instead of worrying about soundproofing, get a PA, turn down your amps, mic them, and then do the sound balancing from the PA mixer.

That's how the pros do it live.


I would do this, but we'd need what...7 mics for a drumset + 2 for each guitar amp, and eventually 2 more for bass + vocals. Or is there another way?
Guitars:
Epiphone Les Paul Special II [Heavily Modded]
Hand-Built Jem Copy
Rouge RA-100

Amps:
Crate VC-50
Epiphone Studio 10

Pedals:
DigiTech Bad Monkey
MXR 10 Band EQ
Boss Noise Suppressor
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff w/ Top Boost
#15
Quote by Afyum
I would do this, but we'd need what...7 mics for a drumset + 2 for each guitar amp, and eventually 2 more for bass + vocals. Or is there another way?


Well, don't rush to spend money you don't need to.

But, if you choose to go this route: You're just practicing (not recording something for actual distribution, right?), don't bother micing the drum (you're not gonna have it in another room anyway, or in some sort of isolation chamber), but get a couple cheapo radio shack mics (yeah they ain't Shure SM-57's but they'll do in a pinch @ 20$ a pop -- just make sure they're XLR mics, not the unbalanced TRS ones and you'll be okay), do one mic per guitar or bass amp, and then 2 for vocals (or one if you have no backups vox). Mix those to taste and then raise the volume to meet the drums, see if that helps.

Or, just experiment more with placement. It's good to have a PA for the band, but if you're poor, you may end up just experimenting for a while. I know it took my first band a while to sound okay in a cement basement, too. Keep in mind that it'll never sound like a studio or an album, but so long as it sounds "good enough" that's nothing to sneer at.

And as said above, don't go too crazy on the volume, get a good balance going without trying to trump eachother. Even live, the pros have their amp rigs off-stage and mic'd a huge amount of the time (or they double as side fills). All those rows of Marshall stacks? They're for show. (there's a post over at HC about how a guy remembers seeing Maiden playing through a set of solid-state stacks facing backwards and miced at a Monsters of Rock performance, for example) No way they could get good FOH sound if the sound guy couldn't totally control what's being projected towards the audience. Plus it's easier on your hearing.

Anyway! Don't get too worked up about it, experiment and you'll find a way, I'm sure of it.
Last edited by Nijyo at Jul 9, 2008,
#16
Like everyone else has said, turn it down.


And as far as the drum solo, 20 seconds isn't that long. If you think it sounds good, keep it. Most uncles have ****ty taste in music anyway. Yours is probably no exception.
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#17
its probably not your band, having good epuipment makes a huge difference. i learned this the other day when my band played a gig with a full sound crew, and it was our fist time using moniters or drum mics, or mics on the amps. i was so amazed at how good we sounded
#18
You guys are crazy if you think you can set up a PA in a fully concrete room, and avoid feedback while having a better sound than now. Also egg cartons won't do much. Acoustically treating (Not sound proofing) is not going to be complete cheap.

Getting your amps set up properly is one thing, if you're scooping your mids do the complete opposite. Also having amps with a good full sound is important, as it can sound very muddy if youu're hearing a bunch of harsh trebley sound mixed together.

Your biggest problem is most likely the concrete reflections, which definitely make things sound very muddy and hollow.

Also I'd need to hear the song to tell you if having a 20 second drum solo is bad. Plus if I tell you its a bad idea without hearing the song, are you really going to listen to my opinion and take it out? (I doubt it) Even if 100 people on here said they think its a bad idea without hearing the song, you'd be crazy to consider that opinion, especially if you think it sounds good.
#19
Quote by Afyum
I would do this, but we'd need what...7 mics for a drumset + 2 for each guitar amp, and eventually 2 more for bass + vocals. Or is there another way?

just get one mic for vocals
use you amps line out if you have
also why mic the drummset?
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#20
Ha don't worry bout getting made fun of, my band once did a song entirely in japanese, actually i think its the theme song to bleach (Ichirin No Hana)
#21
Turn it down = yes.

20 second drum solo - are you playing for YOU or are you playing for an audience? If you're playing for YOU, then do it all day long if you want. If you're playing for an audience, just a quick little 2-bar break will do just fine. Most audiences are made up of people like your uncle. They don't want to hear Children of Bodom. They don't want to hear poorly contrived originals, and they don't want to hear drum solos. At least not until they're really drunk. haha

PA - you need a pretty sophisticated PA to handle guitars and bass as well as vox. Most people don't have access to that sort of thing for rehearsals. Try it with a rehearsal PA, and you'll end up with more mess as the guitar and bass try to compete with each other and the vocals for 'space' in the sonic field.

CT
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