#1
hey dudes
say for example im improvising over a backing track in g what scales could i use ?

i know i can use pentatonic and blues in g , but do i have to stick to g scales ?
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#2
Why would you play with an A scale for example over G? If you play, hypothetically, A pentatonic over a back track in G, you're going to end up resolving to A when your tonal center is G. That wouldn't sound good or make any sense.

Now, say you're playing A dorian over G major. A dorian is "relative" to G major as they have the same notes. You're not necessarily playing G major, but since it's a mode, modes tend to resolve to the relative major/minor (mostly major) and in this case that would be G. So, you COULD think of it as playing A dorian over G major but in reality, you're playing G major because the notes are the same and the tonal center is G.


If you're getting bored, try some pitch axis theory (made famous by Joe Satriani, God). Pitch axis basically says you can play anything that has a root of the tonal center. It's mostly used over vamps though. In short, it says... say you're playing G maj7, Gm7b5, G11, Gdim, GmM7. You could solo over that with anything in G. Just play anything with a root note of G and you'll resolve to the right spot. It's a great way to spice things up.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#3
Quote by metal4all
Why would you play with an A scale for example over G? If you play, hypothetically, A pentatonic over a back track in G, you're going to end up resolving to A when your tonal center is G. That wouldn't sound good or make any sense.

Now, say you're playing A dorian over G major. A dorian is "relative" to G major as they have the same notes. You're not necessarily playing G major, but since it's a mode, modes tend to resolve to the relative major/minor (mostly major) and in this case that would be G. So, you COULD think of it as playing A dorian over G major but in reality, you're playing G major because the notes are the same and the tonal center is G.


If you're getting bored, try some pitch axis theory (made famous by Joe Satriani, God). Pitch axis basically says you can play anything that has a root of the tonal center. It's mostly used over vamps though. In short, it says... say you're playing G maj7, Gm7b5, G11, Gdim, GmM7. You could solo over that with anything in G. Just play anything with a root note of G and you'll resolve to the right spot. It's a great way to spice things up.


Didn't read all of this, but you can play A minor pentatonic over a G major progression. A minor pentatonic has A C D E G, so it'd work fine.
#4
Quote by ouchies
Didn't read all of this, but you can play A minor pentatonic over a G major progression. A minor pentatonic has A C D E G, so it'd work fine.

I said in the example A pentatonic. I didn't specify "minor" so it's to be assumed i meant major.

You COULD play A minor pentatonic but that goes back to what i explained.


(shoulda read all it i put work into it. ...i'm j/k man. i'm pretty sure you know more than me)
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#5
Quote by higgy30
hey dudes
say for example im improvising over a backing track in g what scales could i use ?


Well you need to know more about the track before you can determine that. What's the chord progression?
#6
A minor pentatonic uses A, Cb, D, E, G
G Major has G A B C D E F# G.

So if I avoided using the Cb, I could use the A Minor pentatonic over anything in G?

Edit: Sorry, not trying to steal the topic, but I was wondering.

Actually the Cb is a C in Am pentatonic. With the notes A C D E G, it would work over a G chord progression. Only you wouldn't be playing in Am anymore, you'd be going at a G scale (a 1 2 4 5 6 formula) which name currently escapes my mind. Seniors moment. I'll edit my post once I remember it again.
Last edited by bluesrocker101 at Jul 9, 2008,
#7
There's no Cb in A minor pentatonic.

The intervals state that there is a b3. You put the intervals over relative major scale (A major) and you see that there was a C# for the 3 and with the b3 to make it A minor, you get C natural. You could also think of how A minor is the relative minor to C major (which of course has no sharps/flats).

This STILL goes back to what i said. If you play A minor pentatonic over a G major progression, it's going to want to resolve to G. Since the notes in A minor pentatonic are also in G major, and it's going to want to resolve to G, you're actually playing G major and NOT A minor pentatonic, but you could still think of it as playing A minor pentatonic.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥