#1
I have always heard that you should always practice your scales in all 12 keys. When I practice my major scales, I choose one position on the neck and play all notes of the major scale possible in the position that I'm in, ascending and descending. I start by playing the C major scale and i go clockwise around the circle of 5ths. This takes about 15-20 minutes. This has helped me a ton with memorizing my major scales, key signatures, and notes on the fretboard. I think I'm about ready to start practicing my minor scales.

Practicing in all 12 keys isn't that hard if I'm practicing one scale, but there are 3 or 4 minor scales. If I practice in all 12 keys for 5 different scales, that turns into an hour of practicing scales only. I eventually want to start playing some blues, and thats another scale I would have to add to my practice. I also haven't learned modes.

I'm not sure how I can practice all of this information so that I can learn new scales without forgetting anything I learned before.
#2
What I do when I practice my flute (I haven't memorized all the scales on guitar =P) I just go up + down every major scale quickly (16th notes) first. Then, I go through all the relative minors; that means natural, harmonic, and melodic for each.

If I have a new scale to learn, put it at the end and after a few days I'll usually get it.
This whole thing takes me about 20 minutes tops every day, and I play it as a warm-up.

Modes will be easy, as they are simply major scales but with different starting notes. If you know your major scales and can play them quickly, modes should be no problem for you.
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#3
Start off with just the natural minor scale, the shapes will all be the same as their relative major scales but I think you'll get a better idea of how they fit together and how to think about it when playing. Once you've practiced that until you're satisfied, move on to harmonic minor and then melodic. Just take them one at a time, there's no need to learn them all together.
The modes of the major scale all fit in with the major scale shapes aswell, so you can apply what you learned from practicing the natural minor to them.
I think the blues scale will be much easier to do than that. I don't know if it would be too beneficial to practice it as you have the major scale or if it would be a waste of time.
#4
So I'm on the right track? I guess I will be able to get through them all faster as I get better at them.
#5
I've been thinking about this all day and I have come up with a couple of ideas. I was thinking instead of playing in all 12 keys in one day, I could play in one key a day for now, and play in up and down the entire fretboard and after 12 days, I would start over. I can throw in the corresponding minor scales once I'm ready for that. Or would you recomend playing one position and all 12 keys?

I also discovered finale notepad today. It would be extremely easy to put each position of a scale, as well as something like a 4 note coil into music notation and practice my sightreading and my scales simultaneously.

I'm just looking for some feedback so I can be practicing correctly.

Thanks
#6
Quote by greekorican5
I've been thinking about this all day and I have come up with a couple of ideas. I was thinking instead of playing in all 12 keys in one day, I could play in one key a day for now, and play in up and down the entire fretboard and after 12 days, I would start over. I can throw in the corresponding minor scales once I'm ready for that. Or would you recomend playing one position and all 12 keys?


The most important thing with scales is getting the sound into your fingers. Either of these ideas will work- try mixing them up and see which works best for you.

Quote by greekorican5
I also discovered finale notepad today. It would be extremely easy to put each position of a scale, as well as something like a 4 note coil into music notation and practice my sightreading and my scales simultaneously.


Better to learn to transpose while reading. If you ever want to play styles that modulate a lot you'll have to be able to do so. Part of sight-reading well is being able to transpose while reading- actually that is often the hardest part of reading charts, IMHO. You'll thank me for this the first time someone slaps a fake book in front of you and says "btw, we play this in B flat, not F. Go!"