#1
I've recently got into writing some slap bass stuff but I'm sometimes find it difficult getting out of the Root-Ocave pattern. What are some other popular shapes used in Slap that will freshen up some of my playing?
Quote by guitarhero_764
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Ibanez ATK300 ◈ Sansamp VT Bass ◈ EHX Nano Small Stone ◈ Hartke LH500 ◈ Ashdown/Celestion 115
#2
One of the most useful and probably inhibiting things to use is the pentatonic. I say inhibiting because it's often hard to break out of using the pentatonic scale, but it works so damn well with slap. Another one I like to use is the Dorian mode. I'm not really a big slapper or anything but those are the two I use the most when I do.
#3
Thanks a lot. Haven't really got the hang of using pentatonic for slap, but dorian works really well.
EDIT: I wrote a riff in A Major(ionian), if i wanted to use a riff that was in dorian for a different part of the song, would it be out of key? Or is the fact that they are both major overule the mode?
Quote by guitarhero_764
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Ibanez ATK300 ◈ Sansamp VT Bass ◈ EHX Nano Small Stone ◈ Hartke LH500 ◈ Ashdown/Celestion 115
Last edited by ScottB. at Jul 9, 2008,
#5
I'm playing A Dorian
Quote by guitarhero_764
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Ibanez ATK300 ◈ Sansamp VT Bass ◈ EHX Nano Small Stone ◈ Hartke LH500 ◈ Ashdown/Celestion 115
#7
then no that would not be in key with A major. if you are using A dorian then it would be in key with G major.

the way modes work is each mode corresponds to a certain scale degree. there are 7 scale degrees and 7 modes.

1 ionian (your major scale)
2 dorian
3 phrygian
4 lydian
5 myxolydian
6 aeolyian (your relative natural minor scale)
7 locrian

to stay in key with modes you just have to take the key your in and then make sure you play whatever mode you want to play over its corresponding scale degree for that key.

example: for you G major (one sharp)

GABCDEF#-ionian in G

ABCDEF#G-dorian in G

BCDEF#GA-Phrygian in G

CDEF#GAB-Lydian in G

DEF#GABC-Myxolydian in G

EF#GABCD-Aeolyian in G

F#GABCDE-Locrian in G

i hope that wasnt an information overload. let me know if i need to clear anything up.

btw i do realize i probably misspelled a few of those but oh well you get the idea :P

oh ok my bad. i started this then had to go do some stuff and jazz_rock_feel answered your question. I do agree though, sometimes you can get some cool harmonies and what not by doing stuff like A dorian over A major but you can also get some really dissonant stuff on some notes since they will only be a half step apart. just play around with it and see what you like!
Last edited by dr.will at Jul 9, 2008,
#8
Quote by dr.will
then no that would not be in key with A major. if you are using A dorian then it would be in key with G major.

the way modes work is each mode corresponds to a certain scale degree. there are 7 scale degrees and 7 modes.

1 ionian (your major scale)
2 dorian
3 phrygian
4 lydian
5 myxolydian
6 aeolyian (your relative natural minor scale)
7 locrian

to stay in key with modes you just have to take the key your in and then make sure you play whatever mode you want to play over its corresponding scale degree for that key.

example: for you G major (one sharp)

GABCDEF#-ionian in G

ABCDEF#G-dorian in G

BCDEF#GA-Phrygian in G

CDEF#GAB-Lydian in G

DEF#GABC-Myxolydian in G

EF#GABCD-Aeolyian in G

F#GABCDE-Locrian in G

i hope that wasnt an information overload. let me know if i need to clear anything up.

btw i do realize i probably misspelled a few of those but oh well you get the idea :P

oh ok my bad. i started this then had to go do some stuff and jazz_rock_feel answered your question. I do agree though, sometimes you can get some cool harmonies and what not by doing stuff like A dorian over A major but you can also get some really dissonant stuff on some notes since they will only be a half step apart. just play around with it and see what you like!


But I think Bales said that he would be out of key. But that isn't always a bad thing. My playing becomes pretty generic and stuff if I just stay in key. Chromatics are where its at for me.
#9
Quote by dr.will
then no that would not be in key with A major. if you are using A dorian then it would be in key with G major.

the way modes work is each mode corresponds to a certain scale degree. there are 7 scale degrees and 7 modes.

1 ionian (your major scale)
2 dorian
3 phrygian
4 lydian
5 myxolydian
6 aeolyian (your relative natural minor scale)
7 locrian

to stay in key with modes you just have to take the key your in and then make sure you play whatever mode you want to play over its corresponding scale degree for that key.

example: for you G major (one sharp)

GABCDEF#-ionian in G

ABCDEF#G-dorian in G

BCDEF#GA-Phrygian in G

CDEF#GAB-Lydian in G

DEF#GABC-Myxolydian in G

EF#GABCD-Aeolyian in G

F#GABCDE-Locrian in G

i hope that wasnt an information overload. let me know if i need to clear anything up.

btw i do realize i probably misspelled a few of those but oh well you get the idea :P

oh ok my bad. i started this then had to go do some stuff and jazz_rock_feel answered your question. I do agree though, sometimes you can get some cool harmonies and what not by doing stuff like A dorian over A major but you can also get some really dissonant stuff on some notes since they will only be a half step apart. just play around with it and see what you like!




GABCDEF#-ionian in G

ABCDEF#G-dorian in A

BCDEF#GA-Phrygian in B

CDEF#GAB-Lydian in C

DEF#GABC-Myxolydian in D

EF#GABCD-Aeolyian in E

F#GABCDE-Locrian in F#

That's how it should be.
#10
Quote by watchingmefall

GABCDEF#-ionian in G

ABCDEF#G-dorian in A

BCDEF#GA-Phrygian in B

CDEF#GAB-Lydian in C

DEF#GABC-Myxolydian in D

EF#GABCD-Aeolyian in E

F#GABCDE-Locrian in F#

That's how it should be.


no i ment like that is the dorian etc. in the key of G (1 #). if it was dorian in A it would have 3 #'s. A dorian and dorian in A are different. the first implys it is the dorian scale starting on A (which has only the F# aka key of G) the second implying that it is the dorian scale in the key of A (which has the F# C# and G# which would actually make it B dorian) but its all gravy

and i agree switching it up can get you some interesting stuff but if you play A dorian in A major you will mess up your chord harmonies (assuming your playing over chords) due to the fact that one has F# and the other has F# C# G# which will make some notes only a half step apart making them sound more wrong then right. if its just solo stuff then it would probably just sound like a key change.
Last edited by dr.will at Jul 9, 2008,