#1
I've seen chords like G/D and D/F#, etc and I'm wondering what that means and what type of chords these are. I don't recall reading anything about them in the theory sticky.
Thanks
#3
Those are split chords, or chords that intentionally have a tone other than the root as the bass note. In the case of G/D, the chord is a G major, but with D as the lowest note.
#4
that is... for example D/F#

a D, with an added F# on the bass. Some of these chords are easy to play on guitar. You would play the F# with your thumb for example... and chords like C/G can be done. Sometimes they are hard, they are generally for the piano really.
#5
The chord name comes before the slash, the note after the slash is the note in the bass (lowest note)

So those specific chords:
G/D
G major (G B D) is the chord, and the D note is in the bass. This would be a second inversion, because the fifth is in the bass.
D/F#
D major (D F# A) is the chord, and F# is in the bass. This would be a first inversion, because the third is in the bass.

To learn more about inversions, look here http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/html/id42_en.html
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#6
Ok cool. I'm fairly familiar with inversions. I read about em in the sticky I just never knew that the chords were written like that to imply the inverted chord. So C in the second inversion would be written C/G? Thanks again for all the input
#7
Quote by benedge89
that is... for example D/F#

a D, with an added F# on the bass. Some of these chords are easy to play on guitar. You would play the F# with your thumb for example... and chords like C/G can be done. Sometimes they are hard, they are generally for the piano really.



you could also use your pinkie on the d string 4th fret if you don't feel like using your thumb. i hate to use my thumb. it hurts and doesn't feel natural.

to the original poster:
the idea is to take a note out of the chord and use it as the lowest note, rather than the root note (which is the letter in the name of the chord). if you see "C/G' think "C with a G in the bass

C:                    C/G:

e |0                  e|0
B |1                  B|1
G |0                  G|0
D |2                  D|2
A |3                  A|3
E |0                  E|3  <---use the pinkie


occasionally you'll get something like D/A which is very convenient, because in this situation, you can just hit the open a string when you strum. so those are nifty.
#8
Quote by rockadoodle
Ok cool. I'm fairly familiar with inversions. I read about em in the sticky I just never knew that the chords were written like that to imply the inverted chord. So C in the second inversion would be written C/G? Thanks again for all the input
Yes. However, not every X/Y chord is an inversion. Something like C/A could be used, in which the bass note is not actually a part of the original chord. The note after the slash is just the bass note and it is sometimes notated this way to save having to alter the original chord(such as in a Dm Dm/C# Dm/C Dm/B progression, in which extensions would have to be added for all but the first).